Front Line Kids

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Front Line Kids
Directed by Maclean Rogers
Written by
Produced by Hugh Perceval
Starring Leslie Fuller
Cinematography Stephen Dade
Edited byA. Charles Knott
Music by Percival Mackey
Production
company
Distributed byButcher's Film Service
Release date
29 June 1942
Running time
80 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
Language English

Front Line Kids is a 1942 British comedy film directed by Maclean Rogers and starring Leslie Fuller. [1] It was made at the Riverside Studios in Hammersmith. The film's sets were designed by the art director Andrew Mazzei.

Contents

In wartime London an unruly group of boys assist an incompetent hotel porter to thwart a gang of criminals operating out of the building.

Cast

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References

  1. Chibnall & McFarlane p.8

Bibliography