His Grace Gives Notice (1924 film)

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His Grace Gives Notice
Directed by W.P. Kellino
Written byLaura Troubridge (novel)
Lydia Hayward
Starring Nora Swinburne
Henry Victor and John Stuart
Mary Brough
Production
company
Distributed byStoll Pictures
Release date
May 1924
Running time
5,900 feet [1]
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguagesSilent
English intertitles

His Grace Gives Notice is a 1924 British silent comedy film directed by W.P. Kellino and starring Nora Swinburne, Henry Victor and John Stuart. [2] It is an adaptation of the 1922 novel His Grace Gives Notice by Laura Troubridge. A sound adaptation was made in 1933.

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References

  1. Low p.382
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 20 September 2011.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

Bibliography