His Wife's Mother (1932 film)

Last updated

His Wife's Mother
Directed by Harry Hughes
Produced by Walter C. Mycroft
Written by William Matthew Scott (play)
Harry Hughes
Starring Jerry Verno
Molly Lamont
Jack Hobbs
Cinematography Phil Grindrod
Walter Harvey
Edited byA.E. Bates
Production
company
Distributed by Wardour Films
Release date
  • October 1932 (1932-10)
Running time
70 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

His Wife's Mother is a 1932 British comedy film directed by Harry Hughes and starring Jerry Verno, Molly Lamont and Jack Hobbs. It is an adaptation of the stage farce The Queer Fish by William Matthew Scott, pen name Will Scott. The film was made at Elstree Studios by British International Pictures. [1] The film's sets were designed by the art director John Mead.

Contents

Synopsis

When a newly-married man's mother-in-law sees him with another woman and mistakenly believes he is having an affair, he goes to extraordinary lengths to try and convince her otherwise. With the assistance of his valet and friend he attempts to prove that she saw his double, a dangerous jewel thief.

Cast

Related Research Articles

<i>Knock on Wood</i> (film)

Knock on Wood is a 1954 comedy starring Danny Kaye and Mai Zetterling. Other actors in the film include Torin Thatcher, David Burns, and Leon Askin. The film was written and directed by Melvin Frank and Norman Panama, with songs by Kaye's wife, Sylvia Fine.

The Clairvoyant is a 1935 British drama film directed by Maurice Elvey and starring Claude Rains, Fay Wray, and Jane Baxter. Based on the novel of the same name by Ernst Lothar, it was made at Islington Studios. The film's sets were designed by the German art director Alfred Junge. Bryan Edgar Wallace contributed to the screenplay.

Molly Lamont

Molly Lamont was a British film actress.

<i>Bless This House</i> (film)

Bless This House is a 1972 British comedy film directed by Gerald Thomas starring Sid James, Diana Coupland, Terry Scott, June Whitfield and Peter Butterworth. It is a spin-off from the television sitcom Bless This House.

<i>The Wifes Family</i> 1931 film

The Wife's Family is a 1931 British comedy film directed by Monty Banks and starring Gene Gerrard, Muriel Angelus, and Amy Veness. It was based on the popular stage farce by Fred Duprez. The play was subsequently filmed a further four times: in a Swedish version Svärmor kommer, in 1932; a 1933 Finnish film Voi meitä! Anoppi tulee; and British remakes in 1941 and 1956.

<i>Royal Cavalcade</i> 1935 film

Royal Cavalcade, also known as Regal Cavalcade, is a 1935 British, black-and-white, drama film directed by six separate directors: Thomas Bentley, Herbert Brenon, Norman Lee, Walter Summers, W.P. Kellino and Marcel Varnel. The film features Marie Lohr, Hermione Baddeley, Owen Nares, Robert Hale, Austin Trevor, James Carew, Edward Chapman and Ronald Shiner as the Soldier in Trenches. The film was presented by Associated British Pictures Corporation.

Jerry Verno

Jerry Verno was a British film actor. He appeared in 39 films between 1931 and 1966, including five films directed by Michael Powell, and two with Alfred Hitchcock.

The Last Coupon is a 1932 British comedy film directed by Frank Launder and starring Leslie Fuller, Mary Jerrold and Molly Lamont. It was based on a play by Ernest Bryan and was a success at the box office.

Gypsy Melody is a 1936 British musical comedy film directed by Edmond T. Gréville and starring Lupe Vélez, Alfred Rode and Jerry Verno. It was made at Elstree Studios. The sets were designed by art director John Mead.

Love Lies is a 1932 British musical comedy film directed by Lupino Lane and starring Stanley Lupino, Dorothy Boyd and Jack Hobbs. It was made by British International Pictures at Elstree Studios. It was based on Stanley Lupino's own hit 1929 stage musical.

Irish Hearts is a 1934 British drama film directed by Brian Desmond Hurst and starring Lester Matthews, Nancy Burne and Molly Lamont. It was made at Cricklewood Studios, as a quota quickie. It was also known by the alternative title Norah O'Neale. It was based on Johnson Abrahams's novel Night Nurse.

Leave It to Me is a 1933 British comedy film directed by Monty Banks and starring Gene Gerrard, Olive Borden and Molly Lamont. It was made at Elstree Studios. The film's sets were designed by the art director David Rawnsley. It is an adaptation of the play Leave It to Psmith (1930) by Ian Hay and P.G. Wodehouse, which is based on Wodehouse's novel Leave It to Psmith (1923).

Intimate Relations is a 1937 British comedy film directed by Clayton Hutton and starring June Clyde, Garry Marsh and Jack Hobbs. It was made at Highbury Studios.

Inheritance is a 1920 British silent drama film directed by Wilfred Noy and starring Mary Odette and Jack Hobbs.

Handle with Care is a 1935 British comedy film directed by Randall Faye and starring Molly Lamont, Jack Hobbs and James Finlayson. It was a quota quickie made at the Nettlefold Studios in Walton-on-Thames.

The Strangler is a 1932 British crime film directed by Norman Lee and starring Jack Morrison, Moira Lynd and Lewis Dayton. It was made at Welwyn Studios.

Doctor Josser K.C. is a 1931 British comedy film directed by Norman Lee and starring Ernie Lotinga, Jack Hobbs and Molly Lamont. Made at Elstree Studios it was part of the Josser series of comedies featuring Lotinga. It is sometimes confused with another production P.C. Josser although they are separate films made at different studios by different directors.

Miracles Do Happen is a 1938 British comedy film directed by Maclean Rogers and starring Jack Hobbs, Bruce Seton and Marjorie Taylor. It was made at Isleworth Studios as a quota quickie.

The Life of the Party is a 1934 British comedy film directed by Ralph Dawson and starring Jerry Verno, Betty Astell and Eric Fawcett. It was made by Warner Brothers as a quota quickie at Teddington Studios.

The Beggar Student is a 1931 British operetta film directed by Victor Hanbury and John Harvel and starring Shirley Dale, Lance Fairfax and Jerry Verno. It was based on the 1882 operetta The Beggar Student composed by Carl Millöcker. A separate German film was made the same year.

References

  1. Wood p.75

Bibliography