I See Ice

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I See Ice
"I see Ice" (1938).jpg
Directed by Anthony Kimmins
Written by
Produced by Basil Dean
Starring
Cinematography
Edited byErnest Aldridge
Music by Ernest Irving
Production
company
Distributed by Associated British
Release date
  • 10 February 1938 (1938-02-10)
Running time
84 mins
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

I See Ice is a 1938 British comedy film directed by Anthony Kimmins and starring George Formby, Kay Walsh and Betty Stockfeld. [1] The film depicts the adventures of a photographer working for a London newspaper. It features the songs "In My Little Snapshot Album", "Noughts And Crosses" and "Mother What'll I Do Now". [2]

Contents

Plot

The farcical adventures of a prop man (George Formby) with a touring ice ballet. Inventing a new sort of candid camera in his spare time, and concealing it in a bow-tie, our hero gets into a mess of trouble when he takes an incriminating photo of an important man; pulls a communication cord; winds up in jail; referees a hockey match; finds himself in a stage show dressed as a cossack; woos an attractive young ice skater (Kay Walsh); and eventually wins a job on a newspaper. [2] [3] [4]

Cast

Critical reception

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References

  1. "BFI | Film & TV Database | I SEE ICE! (1938)". Ftvdb.bfi.org.uk. 16 April 2009. Archived from the original on 13 January 2009. Retrieved 13 March 2014.
  2. 1 2 3 "I See Ice". Georgeformby.co.uk. Retrieved 13 March 2014.
  3. "I See Ice! | BFI | BFI". Explore.bfi.org.uk. Archived from the original on 11 July 2012. Retrieved 13 March 2014.
  4. 1 2 "I See Ice Trailer". TV Guide. Retrieved 13 March 2014.
  5. Erickson, Hal. "I See Ice (1938) –". AllMovie. Retrieved 13 March 2014.

Bibliography