Trouble Brewing (1939 film)

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Trouble Brewing
"Trouble Brewing" (1939 film).jpg
Poster, from UK trade advertisement
Directed by Anthony Kimmins
Written by
Produced by Jack Kitchin
Starring
Cinematography Ronald Neame
Edited by
  • Ernest Aldridge
  • Eric Williams
Music by Ernest Irving
Production
company
Distributed by Associated British
Release date
March 1939
Running time
87 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Trouble Brewing is a 1939 British comedy film directed by Anthony Kimmins and starring George Formby, Googie Withers and Gus McNaughton. [1] It was made by Associated Talking Pictures, [2] and includes the songs "Fanlight Fanny" and "Hitting the Highspots Now". [3] The film is based on a novel by Joan Butler, and the sets were designed by art director Wilfred Shingleton.

Contents

Plot summary

George Formby plays George Gullip, a Daily Sun compositor who wins a large sum at the racing. He collects three ten-pound notes. Unable to spend them at the bar, he exchanges them for six fivers. He is paid with counterfeit notes. Gullip then tries to find the criminals. In so doing he goes "undercover" as a waiter and a wrestler. Clues suggest the villain is Gullip's own boss.

Cast

Critical reception

TV Guide found the film an "enjoyable Formby vehicle". [3] Sky Movies wrote, "the fun is as fast and furious in this incident-packed George Formby romp as in any film he made...Receipts foamed over at box-offices throughout Britain." [4]

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References

  1. "BFI | Film & TV Database | TROUBLE BREWING (1939)". Ftvdb.bfi.org.uk. 16 April 2009. Archived from the original on 14 January 2009. Retrieved 13 March 2014.
  2. Wood p.99
  3. 1 2 "Trouble Brewing Review". Movies.tvguide.com. Retrieved 13 March 2014.
  4. "Trouble Brewing - Sky Movies HD". Skymovies.sky.com. 6 November 2003. Retrieved 13 March 2014.

Bibliography