John Whistler (MP)

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John Whistler (c. 1580 – 1647) was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1624 and 1644. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Whistler was the son of Hugh Whistler of Milton Parva, Oxfordshire. He matriculated at Trinity College, Oxford on 14 October 1597 aged 17 and was awarded BA on 17 February 1601. He entered Gray's Inn on 4 May 1601 and was called to the bar in 1611. He succeeded his father after 1612, and held a number of positions in his Inn, serving as reader of Staple Inn in 1620, and of Gray's Inn in 1628. He became a bencher of Gray's Inn in 1629, dean of the chapel in 1635, and treasurer between 1639 and 1640. [1] In 1623 he was made deputy recorder of Oxford to Thomas Wentworth. [2] In that same year he was also made a freeman of the city, served as a fee'd counsel and was appointed a Justice of the Peace for Oxford. [1]

Trinity College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford

Trinity College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. The college was founded in 1555 by Sir Thomas Pope, on land previously occupied by Durham College, home to Benedictine monks from Durham Cathedral.

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

Grays Inn one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn, commonly known as Gray's Inn, is one of the four Inns of Court in London. To be called to the bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, a person must belong to one of these Inns. Located at the intersection of High Holborn and Gray's Inn Road in Central London, the Inn is both a professional body and a provider of office accommodation (chambers) for many barristers. It is ruled by a governing council called "Pension", made up of the Masters of the Bench, and led by the Treasurer, who is elected to serve a one-year term. The Inn is known for its gardens, or Walks, which have existed since at least 1597.

In 1624, Whistler was elected Member of Parliament for Oxford. He was re-elected MP for Oxford in 1625, 1626 and 1628 and sat until 1629 when King Charles decided to rule without parliament for eleven years. He succeeded Wentworth as recorder of Oxford on his death in 1627. [1] [2]

Oxford was a parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. It comprised the city of Oxford in the county of Oxfordshire, and elected two members of parliament from its creation in 1295 until 1885 when its representation was reduced to one member by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885.

Charles I of England 17th-century monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland

Charles I was the monarch over the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

The Personal Rule was the period from 1629 to 1640, when King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland ruled without recourse to Parliament. The King claimed that he was entitled to do this under the Royal Prerogative.

Whistler contested Oxford again in March 1640 but was defeated. [1] He was successful in November 1640 in gaining re-election for the Long Parliament. [1] He supported the King and attended the Oxford Parliament in 1644, which caused him to be disabled from sitting in the House of Commons, probably in January 1644. [1] [2] He never married, and died in 1647, being buried at Little Haseley on 2 April 1647. [1]

Long Parliament English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660

The Long Parliament was an English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660. It followed the fiasco of the Short Parliament which had convened for only three weeks during the spring of 1640, and which in turn had followed an 11-year parliamentary absence. In September 1640, King Charles I issued writs summoning a parliament to convene on 3 November 1640. He intended it to pass financial bills, a step made necessary by the costs of the Bishops' Wars in Scotland. The Long Parliament received its name from the fact that, by Act of Parliament, it stipulated it could be dissolved only with agreement of the members; and, those members did not agree to its dissolution until 16 March 1660, after the English Civil War and near the close of the Interregnum.

Oxford Parliament (1644)

The Oxford Parliament was the Parliament assembled by King Charles I for the first time on 22 January 1644 and adjourned for the last time on 10 March 1645, with the purpose of being an instrument of the Royalist war campaign.

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Sir John Brooke
Thomas Wentworth
Member of Parliament for Oxford
1624–1629
With: Thomas Wentworth 1624–1626
Thomas Wentworth 1628–1629
Succeeded by
Parliament suspended until 1640
Preceded by
Parliament suspended since 1640
Member of Parliament for Oxford
1640–1644
With: Viscount Andover
John Smith
Succeeded by
John Nixon
John Doyley