John Brooke, 1st Baron Cobham

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John Brooke, 1st Baron Cobham (15 August 1575 - 1660) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1614 and 1643. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

Brooke was the son of Hon. Henry Brooke and his wife Anne Sutton, daughter of Sir Henry Sutton of Nottinghamshire; his father was the fifth son of George Brooke, 9th Baron Cobham. In 1601 Brooke was in Paris learning French and in 1610 was journeying by sea and put into a port in Portugal. He was knighted in January 1612. [1] In 1614, he was elected Member of Parliament for Gatton. He was elected MP for Oxford in 1621 and MP for Great Bedwyn in 1625. [2] In May 1626 he was made senior Teller of the Exchequer. He lived at Heckington, Lincolnshire. [1]

In November 1640 Brooke was elected MP for Appleby for the Long Parliament. In the civil war he granted a warrant for raising money for the King's service in Lincolnshire, and was disabled from sitting in parliament on 15 March 1643. [3] He was created Baron Cobham on 3 January 1645. [1]

Brooke died in 1660 and was buried at Wakerley, Northamptonshire on 20 May 1660. [1]

Brooke married firstly Anne, who died in February 1625, and secondly Francis Bampfield, daughter of Sir William Bampfield. [1]

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Baron Cobham

The title Baron Cobham has been created numerous times in the Peerage of England; often multiple creations have been extant simultaneously, especially in the fourteenth century. The earliest creation was in 1313 for Henry de Cobham, 1st Baron Cobham, lord of the manors of Cobham and of Cooling, both in the county of Kent. The de Cobham family died out in the male line in 1408, with the death of the 3rd Baron Cobham, but the title continued via a female line to the Brooke family, which originated at the estate of "la Brook" near Ilchester in Somerset, and which later resided at Holditch in the parish of Thorncombe and at Weycroft in the parish of Axminster, both in Devon, both fortified manor houses. Following their inheritance the Brooke family resided at Cobham Hall and Cooling Castle in Kent. Henry Brooke, 11th Baron Cobham was attainted in 1603, when the peerage became abeyant instead of becoming extinct. In 1916 the attainder was removed and the abeyance terminated in favor of the fifteenth baron. The twelfth to fourteenth barons never actually held the title. This creation became abeyant again in 1951.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 W R Williams The Parliamentary History of the County of Oxford
  2. Willis, Browne (1750). Notitia Parliamentaria, Part II: A Series or Lists of the Representatives in the several Parliaments held from the Reformation 1541, to the Restoration 1660 ... London. pp.  onepage&q&f&#61, false 166–239.
  3. The parliamentary or constitutional history of England;: being a faithful account of all the most remarkable transactions in Parliament, from the earliest times. Collected from the journals of both Houses, the records, ..., Volume 9
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Gresham
Sir Nicholas Saunders
Member of Parliament for Gatton
1614
With: Sir Thomas Gresham
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas Gresham
Sir Thomas Bludder
Preceded by
Sir John Astley
Thomas Wentworth
Member of Parliament for Oxford
1621–1622
With: Thomas Wentworth
Succeeded by
John Whistler
Thomas Wentworth
Preceded by
Hugh Crompton
William Cholmeley
Member of Parliament for Great Bedwyn
1625
With: William Cholmeley
Succeeded by
John Selden
Sir Maurice Berkeley
Preceded by
Richard Boyle
Richard Lowther
Member of Parliament for Appleby
1640–1643
With: Richard Boyle
Succeeded by
Richard Salwey
Henry Ireton
Peerage of England
New creation Baron Cobham
1645–1660
Extinct