Kangaroo Tour

Last updated

Kangaroo Tour is the name given to Australian national rugby league team tours of Great Britain and France, tours to New Zealand and the one off tour to Papua New Guinea (1991). The first Kangaroo Tour was in 1908. Traditionally, Kangaroo Tours took place every four years and involved a three-Test Ashes series against Great Britain (sometimes called Northern Union or The Lions) and a number of tour matches. The 1911/12 and 1921/22 tours were by the Australasian Kangaroos as both teams included New Zealand players. Some Kangaroo tours to Great Britain and France also included international friendly matches against Wales, though these games were not given test match status.

Contents

The last full Kangaroo Tour was in 1994, although shortened Kangaroo Tours took place in 2001 and again in 2003.

Since 1954, the Kangaroos have also made a number of overseas tours for multi-team tournaments such as the World Cup, Tri-Nations and Four Nations, however these are not classed as Kangaroo tours.

Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France

1908/09 Kangaroo Tour

Northern Union vs. Australia

Northern Union 22–22 Australia Northern Union 15–5 Australia Northern Union 6–5 Australia

Played: 45
Won: 17 Drew: 6 Lost: 22
Ashes: Great Britain 2–0

1911/12 Kangaroo Tour

Northern Union vs. Australasia

Played: 35
Won: 28 Drew: 2 Lost: 5
Ashes: Australasia 2–0

1921/22 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australasia

Played: 36
Won: 27 Drew: 0 Lost: 9
Ashes: Great Britain 2–1

1929/30 Kangaroo Tour

The Lions vs. Australia

Played: 35
Won: 24 Drew: 2 Lost: 7
Ashes: Great Britain 2–1

1933/34 Kangaroo Tour

The Lions vs. Australia

Played: 37
Won: 27 Drew: 0 Lost: 10
Ashes: Great Britain 3–0

1937/38 Kangaroo Tour

The Lions vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 35
Won: 22 Drew: 1 Lost: 12
Ashes: Great Britain 2–1

1948/49 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 37
Won: 24 Drew: 0 Lost: 13
Ashes: Great Britain 3–0

1952/53 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 40
Won: 33 Drew: 1 Lost: 6
Ashes: Great Britain 2–1

1956/57 Kangaroo Tour

A record eleven Queenslanders were selected for this tour. [2]

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 28
Won: 18 Drew: 1 Lost: 9
Ashes: Great Britain 2–1

1959/60 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 24
Won: 15 Drew: 0 Lost: 9
Ashes: Great Britain 2–1

1963/64 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

The 1963 Kangaroos thus became the first Australian only side to win the Ashes on British soil. [3]

France vs. Australia

Played: 36
Won: 28 Drew: 1 Lost: 7
Ashes: Australia 2–1

1967/68 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 27
Won: 16 Drew: 2 Lost: 9
Ashes: Australia 2–1

1973 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 19
Won: 17 Drew: 0 Lost: 2
Ashes: Australia 2–1

1978 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 22
Won: 16 Drew: 0 Lost: 6
Ashes: Australia 2–1

1982 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 22
Won: 22 Drew: 0 Lost: 0
Ashes: Australia 3–0

The 1982 Kangaroos became the first team to go through Great Britain and France undefeated earning them the nickname The Invincibles.

1986 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 20
Won: 20 Drew: 0 Lost: 0
Ashes: Australia 3–0

Emulating the 1982 Kangaroo tour, the 1986 Kangaroos went through Great Britain and France undefeated earning them the nickname The Unbeatables.

1990 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 18
Won: 17 Drew: 0 Lost: 1
Ashes: Australia 2–1

1994 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

France vs. Australia

Played: 18
Won: 17 Drew: 0 Lost: 1
Ashes: Australia 2–1

2001 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

Played: 3
Won: 2 Drew: 0 Lost: 1
Ashes: Australia 2–1

2003 Kangaroo Tour

Great Britain vs. Australia

Played: 6
Won: 6 Drew: 0 Lost: 0
Ashes: Australia 3–0

Kangaroo tour of New Zealand

1919

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 9
Won: 8 Drew: 0 Lost: 1
Trans-Tasman series: Australia 3–1

1935

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 6
Won: 5 Drew: 0 Lost: 1
Trans-Tasman series: Australia 2–1

1949

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 10
Won: 9 Drew: 0 Lost: 1
Trans-Tasman series: Draw 1–1

1953

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 9
Won: 7 Drew: 0 Lost: 2
Trans-Tasman series: New Zealand 2–1

1961

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 9
Won: 7 Drew: 0 Lost: 2
Trans-Tasman series: Draw 1–1

1965

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 8
Won: 7 Drew: 0 Lost: 1
Trans-Tasman series: Draw 1–1

1969

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 6
Won: 4 Drew: 0 Lost: 2
Trans-Tasman series: Draw 1–1

1971

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 3
Won: 1 Drew: 0 Lost: 2
Trans-Tasman series: New Zealand 1–0

1980

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 7
Won: 5 Drew: 1 Lost: 1
Trans-Tasman series: Australia 2–0

1985

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 6
Won: 5 Drew: 0 Lost: 1
Trans-Tasman series: Australia 2–1

1989

New Zealand vs. Australia

Played: 6
Won: 5 Drew: 0 Lost: 1
Trans-Tasman series: Australia 3–0

Kangaroo tour of Papua New Guinea

1991

Papua New Guinea vs. Australia

Played: 5
Won: 5 Drew: 0 Lost: 0
Test series: Australia 2–0

See also

Related Research Articles

The 1985–1988 Rugby League World Cup was the ninth Rugby League World Cup tournament held and saw yet another change of format with competition stretched to cover almost three years. The national rugby league teams of Australia, France, Great Britain, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea played each other on a home and away basis. These matches were fitted into the normal international programme of three-match test series between the nations, with a pre-designated match from each series counting as the world cup fixture.

The Ashes series, similar to the cricket series of the same name, is a best-of-three series of test matches between the English and Australian national rugby league football teams. It has been contested 39 times from 1908 until 2003 largely with hosting rights alternating between the two countries. From 1973 Australia won thirteen consecutive Ashes series. The series was set to be revived in 2020, but was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Great Britain national rugby league team Team representing Great Britain in rugby league

The Great Britain national rugby league team represents Great Britain in rugby league. Administered by the Rugby Football League (RFL), the team is nicknamed The Lions.

The Australian national rugby league team, the Kangaroos, have represented Australia in senior men's rugby league football competition since the establishment of the 'Northern Union game' in Australia in 1908. Administered by the Australian Rugby League Commission, the Kangaroos are ranked second in the RLIF World Rankings. The team is the most successful in Rugby League World Cup history, having contested all 15 and won 11 of them, failing to reach the final only once, in the inaugural tournament in 1954. Only five nations have beaten Australia in test matches, and Australia have an overall win percentage of 69%.

Mal Meninga Australian rugby league footballer and coach for Australia

Malcolm Norman Meninga is the head coach of the Australian national team and an Australian former rugby league footballer. Meninga is widely regarded as one of the finest players in the game's history. He enjoyed a long career in both Australia and England, playing mainly as a goal-kicking centre, but also on the wing. After retiring, Meninga has enjoyed success as a coach, and is currently the head coach of Australia.

Rod Wishart is an Australian former professional rugby league footballer who played the 1980s and 1990s. A New South Wales State of Origin and Australian international representative goal-kicking winger, he played club football with the Illawarra Steelers and the St. George Illawarra Dragons in the National Rugby League.

Tony Kemp is a New Zealand former rugby league test representative and former coach of the New Zealand Warriors. He is a commentator for Māori Television's coverage of the Auckland Rugby League competition and also serves as the Football Manager for the New Zealand Rugby League.

Gary Freeman (rugby league)

Gary Ross Freeman is a New Zealand former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 2000s, who both captained and coached the New Zealand national team. He was arguably one of New Zealand's greatest Test halfbacks and at the time of his retirement he was the most-capped New Zealand test player and also held the record for most consecutive tests for New Zealand with 37.

Noel Cleal

Noel Harvey "Crusher" Cleal is an Australian former professional rugby league footballer who also had a successful coaching career. A destructive second-row for the Manly Sea Eagles, he also represented New South Wales in the State of Origin Series and the Australian national rugby league team.

Steve Walters, also known by the nickname of "Boxhead", is an Australian former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s who at the peak of his career was considered the best hooker in the game. An Australian Kangaroos and Queensland Maroons representative, he played in the Canberra Raiders' 1st, 2nd and 3rd grand final victories.

Michael Hancock (rugby league)

Michael John "Mick" Hancock is an Australian former rugby league footballer. An Australian international and Queensland State of Origin representative wing, he played in the Brisbane Broncos first five Grand Final victories in 1992, 1993, 1997 Super League, 1998 and 2000. At the time of his retirement from football in Australia in 2000 he held the Broncos' club records for most career appearances. He played out the rest of his career in England with the Salford City Reds and retired in 2002.

Martin Hodgson was an English rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s. Lauded as one of the game's greatest ever second-rows, he represented Great Britain, England and Cumberland on many occasions. Hodgson played his entire club career with Swinton with whom he won two Championships. He toured Australasia in 1932 and 1936 with the Great Britain lions, and became the only British forward to appear in five Ashes-winning squads, between 1929 and 1937.

Mark Sargent is an Australian former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s. A New South Wales State of Origin and Australian international representative forward, he played in the NSWRL premiership for the Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs and Newcastle Knights, winning the Rothmans Medal in 1989 while playing for Newcastle.

The 1990 Kangaroo Tour was the seventeenth Kangaroo Tour, where the Australian national rugby league team travelled to Europe and played eighteen matches against British and French club and representative rugby league teams, in addition to three Test matches against Great Britain and two Tests against the French. It followed the tour of 1986 and the next was staged in 1994.

The 1986 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France was the sixteenth Kangaroo tour in which the Australian national rugby league team plays a number of tour matches against British and French teams, in addition to the Test matches. The next Kangaroo tour was staged in 1990.

The 1982 Kangaroo tour was the fifteenth Kangaroo tour where the Australian national rugby league team played a number of matches against British and French rugby league teams, in addition to the Test matches. The Australia national rugby league team have generally since 1908 barring wartime, toured Great Britain every four years often capping the tour with matches and Tests in France. This regular touring side are known as the Kangaroos.

1910 Great Britain Lions tour of Australia and New Zealand

The 1910 Great Britain Lions tour of Australia and New Zealand was the first international tour of the Great Britain national rugby league team, "The Lions". They played the second ever Ashes series against Australia, and their first as the visiting team, before travelling to Auckland to take on New Zealand. The tour was a huge promotional and financial success for what was then known as the "Northern Union" game and helped set the pattern for regular, alternating test match series between Britain and Australia. It is regarded as one of the most important events in the history of rugby league.

The 1992 Great Britain Lions tour of Australasia was a tour by the Great Britain national rugby league team, nicknamed the 'Lions', of Papua New Guinea, Australia and New Zealand which took place between May and July 1992. The tour was the last of such length undertaken by the Great Britain team, and included a test match against Papua New Guinea, a three-test series against Australia for The Ashes, and a two-test series against New Zealand for the Baskerville Shield, all interspersed with matches against local club and representative teams.

1992 Rugby League World Cup Final

The 1992 Rugby League World Cup final was the conclusive game of the 1989–1992 Rugby League World Cup tournament and was played between Great Britain and Australia on 24 October 1992 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. Australia won the final by 10 points to 6 in front of an international record crowd of 73,631. Australia, the defending champions, won the Rugby League World Cup for the 7th time.

The 1963-64 Kangaroo tour was the eleventh Kangaroo tour, during which the Australian national rugby league team traveled to Europe and played thirty-six matches against British and French club and representative teams. It included three Test matches against Great Britain for The Ashes, and three Tests against the French. The tour followed the 1959-60 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France and was followed by the 1967-68 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France.

References

  1. England snatches victory in last two minutes (1934-01-15) the Courier-Mail
  2. John MacDonald and Ian Arnold (29 June 1989). "Kangaroos fly the Maroon flag". The Sydney Morning Herald . Australia. p. 50. Retrieved 21 February 2011.
  3. https://sahof.org.au/award-winner/1963-kangaroos-team-rugby-league/

Further reading