List of New York Knicks head coaches

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The New York Knickerbockers are an American professional basketball team based in New York City. They are a member of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Basketball Association (NBA). They play their home games at Madison Square Garden. The franchise's official name "Knickerbockers" came from the style of pants Dutch settlers wore when they moved to America. [1] Having joined the Basketball Association of America (BAA), the predecessor of the NBA, in 1946, the Knicks remain as one of the oldest teams in the NBA. [2] During Red Holzman's tenure, the franchise won its only two NBA championships, the 1970 NBA Finals and the 1973 NBA Finals.

Contents

There have been 26 head coaches for the New York Knicks franchise. Holzman was the franchise's first Coach of the Year winner and is the team's all-time leader in regular season games coached, regular season games won, playoff games coached, and playoff games won. [3] Holzman was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1986 as a coach. [3] Besides Holzman, Rick Pitino, Don Nelson, Pat Riley, Lenny Wilkens, and Larry Brown have been inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame as coaches. Four coaches have been named to the list of the top 10 coaches in NBA history. [4] Neil Cohalan, Joe Lapchick, Vince Boryla, Carl Braun, Eddie Donovan and Herb Williams have spent their entire coaching careers with the Knicks. [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] Boryla, Braun, Harry Gallatin, Dick McGuire, Willis Reed and Williams formerly played for the Knicks. [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16]

Key

GCGames coached
WWins
LLosses
Win% Winning percentage
#Number of coaches [a]
*Spent entire NBA head coaching career with the Knicks
Dagger-14-plain.pngElected into the Basketball Hall of Fame as a coach

Coaches

Note: Statistics are as of April 12, 2018.

#NameTerm [b] GCWLWin%GCWLWin%AchievementsReference
Regular seasonPlayoffs
1 Neil Cohalan * 1946–1947 603327.550523.400 [5]
2 Joe Lapchick * 19471956 573326247.569603030.500 [6]
3 Vince Boryla * 19561958 1658085.485 [7]
4 Andrew Levane 19581959 994851.485202.000 [17]
5 Carl Braun * 19591961 (as player-coach)1274087.315 [8]
6 Eddie Donovan * 19611965 27884194.302 [9]
7 Harry Gallatin 1965 632538.397 [18]
8 Dick McGuire 19651967 17775102.424413.250 [19]
9 Red Holzman Dagger-14-plain.png 19671977 783466317.595955441.568 1969–70 NBA Coach of the Year
2 Championships (1970, 1973)
One of the top 10 coaches in NBA history [4]
[3]
10 Willis Reed 19771978 964947.510624.333 [20]
Red Holzman Dagger-14-plain.png 19781982 314147167.468202.000One of the top 10 coaches in NBA history [4] [3]
11 Hubie Brown 19821986 344138190.40118810.444 [21]
12 Bob Hill 1986–1987 662046.303 [22]
13 Rick Pitino Dagger-14-plain.png 19871989 1649074.5491367.462 [23]
14 Stu Jackson 19891990 975245.5361046.400 [24]
15 John MacLeod 1990–1991 673235.478303.000 [25]
16 Pat Riley Dagger-14-plain.png 19911995 328223105.680633528.556 1992–93 NBA Coach of the Year
One of the top 10 coaches in NBA history [4]
[26]
17 Don Nelson Dagger-14-plain.png 1995–1996 593425.576One of the top 10 coaches in NBA history [4] [27]
18 Jeff Van Gundy 19962001 420248172.590693732.536 [28]
19 Don Chaney 20012004 18472112.391 [29]
20 Herb Williams * 2004 1101.000 [10]
21 Lenny Wilkens Dagger-14-plain.png 20042005 814041.494404.000One of the top 10 coaches in NBA history [4] [30]
Herb Williams * 2005 431627.372 [10]
22 Larry Brown Dagger-14-plain.png 2005–2006 822359.280 [31]
23 Isiah Thomas 20062008 16456108.341 [32]
24 Mike D'Antoni 20082012 288121167.420404.000 [33]
25 Mike Woodson 20122014 18810979.58017710.412 [34]
26 Derek Fisher * 20142016 1364096.294 [35]
27 Kurt Rambis 2016 28919.321 [36]
28 Jeff Hornacek 20162018 16460104.366 [37]
29 David Fizdale 20182019 1042183.202 [38]
29 Mike Miller 2019–present [39]

Notes

Related Research Articles

New York Knicks American professional basketball team

The New York Knickerbockers, more commonly referred to as the Knicks, are an American professional basketball team based in the New York City borough of Manhattan. The Knicks compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference. The team plays its home games at Madison Square Garden, an arena they share with the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League (NHL). They are one of two NBA teams located in New York City; the other team is the Brooklyn Nets. Alongside the Boston Celtics, the Knicks are one of two original NBA teams still located in its original city.

Jeff Hornacek American basketball player and coach

Jeffrey John Hornacek is an American former professional basketball coach and player. He was the head coach for both the Phoenix Suns (2013–2016) and the New York Knicks (2016–2018) of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played shooting guard in the NBA from 1986 through 2000.

Red Holzman American basketball player and coach

William "Red" Holzman was an American professional basketball player and coach. He is probably best known as the head coach of the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1967 to 1982. Holzman helped lead the Knicks to two NBA Championships in 1970 and 1973, and was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1986. In 1996, Holzman was named one of the Top 10 Coaches in NBA History.

Richie Guerin American basketball player and coach

Richard Vincent Guerin is an American retired professional basketball player and coach. He played with the National Basketball Association's (NBA) New York Knicks from 1956 to 1963 and was a player-coach of the St. Louis/Atlanta Hawks franchise where he spent nine years. On February 15, 2013, the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame announced that Guerin had been elected as one of its 2013 inductees.

Harry Gallatin American basketball player and coach

Harry Junior "The Horse" Gallatin was an American professional basketball player and coach. Gallatin played nine seasons for the New York Knicks in the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1948 to 1957, as well as one season with the Detroit Pistons in the 1957–58 season. Gallatin led the NBA in rebounding and was named to the All-NBA First Team in 1954. The following year, he was named to the All-NBA Second Team. For his career, Gallatin played in seven NBA All-Star Games. A member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, he is also a member of the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame, the SIU Edwardsville Athletics Hall of Fame, the Truman State University Athletics Hall of Fame, the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame, two Illinois Basketball Halls of Fame, the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA) Hall of Fame, the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) Hall of Fame, and the SIU Salukis Hall of Fame.

Vince Boryla American basketball player, coach, executive

Vincent Joseph Boryla was an American basketball player, coach and executive. His nickname was "Moose". He graduated from East Chicago Washington High School in 1944. He played basketball at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Denver, where he was named a consensus All-American in 1949. Boryla was part of the U.S team that won the gold medal at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London.

Cornelius J. "Neil" Cohalan was an American basketball coach. He was the first coach of the New York Knicks and has the distinction of being the winning coach of the very first game played in the Basketball Association of America (BAA), the forerunner to the modern National Basketball Association (NBA). The game, a November 1, 1946 contest between the Knicks and the Toronto Huskies played in famed Maple Leaf Gardens, was won 68–66 by the Knickerbockers.

The 1951 NBA All-Star Game was an exhibition basketball game played on March 2, 1951, at Boston Garden in Boston, Massachusetts, home of the Boston Celtics. The game was the first edition of the National Basketball Association (NBA) All-Star Game and was played during the 1950–51 NBA season. The idea of holding an All-Star Game was conceived during a meeting between NBA President Maurice Podoloff, NBA publicity director Haskell Cohen and Boston Celtics owner Walter A. Brown. At that time, the basketball world had just been stunned by the college basketball point-shaving scandal. In order to regain public attention to the league, Cohen suggested the league to host an exhibition game featuring the league's best players, similar to the Major League Baseball's All-Star Game. Although most people, including Podoloff, were pessimistic about the idea, Brown remained confident that it would be a success. He even offered to host the game and to cover all the expenses or potential losses incurred from the game. The Eastern All-Stars team defeated the Western All-Stars team 111–94. Boston Celtics' Ed Macauley was named as the first NBA All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Award. The game became a success, drawing an attendance of 10,094, much higher than that season's average attendance of 3,500.

The 1950–51 Rochester Royals season was the third season for the team in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Royals finished the season by winning their first NBA Championship. The Royals scored 84.6 points per game and allowed 81.7 points per game. Rochester was led up front by Arnie Risen, a 6–9, 200-pound center nicknamed "Stilts", along with 6–5 Arnie Johnson and 6–7 Jack Coleman. The backcourt was manned by Bob Davies and Bobby Wanzer. Among the key reserves was a guard from City College of New York named William "Red" Holzman.

The 1946–47 New York Knicks season was the first season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Knicks, the shortened form of Knickerbockers, named for Father Knickerbocker, are one of only two teams of the original National Basketball Association still located in its original city. The Knickerbockers first head coach was Neil Cohalan.

The 1947–48 New York Knicks season was the second season for the team in the Basketball Association of America (BAA), which later merged with the National Basketball League to become the National Basketball Association. The Knicks finished in second place in the Eastern Division with a 26–22 record and qualified for the BAA Playoffs. In the first round, New York was eliminated by the Baltimore Bullets in a best-of-three series, two games to one. Carl Braun was the team's scoring leader during the season.

The 1953–54 New York Knicks season was the eighth season for the team in the National Basketball Association (NBA). New York won its second straight regular season Eastern Division title with a 44–28 record, which placed them two games ahead of the Boston Celtics and Syracuse Nationals. The first round of the 1954 NBA Playoffs consisted of round-robin tournaments, where the top three teams in each division played each other in home and away matchups. The Knicks went 0–4 against the Celtics and Nationals, and did not qualify for the Eastern Division Finals.

The 1988–89 New York Knicks season was the 43rd season for the team in the National Basketball Association (NBA). During the offseason, the Knicks acquired Charles Oakley from the Chicago Bulls. In the regular season, the Knicks had a 52–30 record and won the Atlantic Division. New York swept the Philadelphia 76ers in the opening round of the playoffs to advance to the Eastern Conference Semifinals, where the team lost to the Bulls in six games. Mark Jackson and Patrick Ewing were selected to play in the 1989 NBA All-Star Game.

The New York Knicks are one of the oldest teams in the National Basketball Association, having played in the league for over 70 years.

References

General
Specific
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  2. "History of the New York Knicks". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on October 16, 2008. Retrieved October 10, 2008.
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  9. 1 2 "Eddie Donovan Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 7, 2008.
  10. 1 2 3 "Herb Williams Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on February 11, 2001. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
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  13. "Harry Gallatin Playing Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 12, 2008.
  14. "Dick McGuire Playing Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 12, 2008.
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  19. "Dick McGuire Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  20. "Willis Reed Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  21. "Hubie Brown Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  22. "Bob Hill Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  23. "Rick Pitino Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on June 24, 2008. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  24. "Stu Jackson Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  25. "John MacLeod Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  26. "Pat Riley Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  27. "Don Nelson Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  28. "Jeff Van Gundy Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  29. "Don Chaney Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  30. "Lenny Wilkens Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  31. "Larry Brown Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  32. "Isiah Thomas Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 8, 2008.
  33. "Mike D'Antoni Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 14, 2012.
  34. "Mike Woodson Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 18, 2012.
  35. "Derek Fisher Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 7, 2015.
  36. "Kurt Rambis Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  37. "Knicks Name Jeff Hornacek Head Coach". NBA. June 2, 2016. Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  38. "Knicks Name David Fizdale Head Coach". NBA. May 3, 2018. Retrieved May 3, 2018.[ permanent dead link ]
  39. "Knicks Name Mike Miller Head Coach". NBA. May 3, 2018. Retrieved December 6, 2019.