Motorola 6847

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Mitsubishi clone M5C6847 Mitsubishi M5C6847.jpg
Mitsubishi clone M5C6847
Motorola 6847 Pinout Mc6847.png
Motorola 6847 Pinout

The MC6847 is a video display generator (VDG) first introduced by Motorola and used in the TRS-80 Color Computer, Dragon 32/64, Laser 200, TRS-80 MC-10, NEC PC-6000 series, Acorn Atom, and the APF Imagination Machine among others. It is a relatively simple display generator compared to other display chips of the time. It is capable of displaying text and graphics contained within a roughly square display matrix 256 pixels wide by 192 lines high. It is capable of displaying nine colors: black, green, yellow, blue, red, buff (almost-but-not-quite white), cyan, magenta, and orange. The low display resolution is a necessity of using television sets as display monitors. Making the display wider risked cutting off characters due to overscan. Compressing more dots into the display window would easily exceed the resolution of the television and be useless.

Motorola, Inc. was an American multinational telecommunications company founded on September 25, 1928, based in Schaumburg, Illinois. After having lost $4.3 billion from 2007 to 2009, the company was divided into two independent public companies, Motorola Mobility and Motorola Solutions on January 4, 2011. Motorola Solutions is generally considered to be the direct successor to Motorola, as the reorganization was structured with Motorola Mobility being spun off. Motorola Mobility was sold to Google in 2012, and acquired by Lenovo in 2014.

TRS-80 Color Computer line of home computers

The RadioShack TRS-80 Color Computer is a line of home computers based on the Motorola 6809 processor. The Tandy Color Computer line started in 1980 with what is now called the CoCo 1 and ended in 1991 with the more powerful CoCo 3. All three CoCo models maintained a high level of software and hardware compatibility, with few programs written for the older model being unable to run on the newer ones.

Dragon 32/64 two home computers

The Dragon 32 and Dragon 64 are home computers that were built in the 1980s. The Dragons are very similar to the TRS-80 Color Computer, and were produced for the European market by Dragon Data, Ltd., in Port Talbot, Wales, and for the US market by Tano of New Orleans, Louisiana. The model numbers reflect the primary difference between the two machines, which have 32 and 64 kilobytes of RAM, respectively.

Contents

Video modes

Video Mode Resolution Colours Bytes
Alphanumeric Internal32 × 162512
Alphanumeric External32 × 162512
Semigraphics 464 × 328512
Semigraphics 664 × 484512
Color Graphics 164 × 6441024
Resolution Graphics 1128 × 641 + Black1024
Color Graphics 2128 × 6442048
Resolution Graphics 2128 × 961 + Black1536
Color Graphics 3128 × 9643072
Resolution Graphics 3128 × 1921 + Black3072
Color Graphics 6128 × 19246144
Resolution Graphics 6256 × 1921 + Black6144

See also

Motorola 6845

The Motorola 6845, or MC6845, is a display controller that was widely used in 8-bit computers during the 1980s. Although intended for designs based on the Motorola 6800 CPU and given a related part number, it was more widely used alongside various other processors, and was most commonly found in machines based on the Zilog Z80 and MOS 6502.

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