Niall Hogan

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Niall Hogan
Birth nameNiall Andrew Hogan
Date of birth (1971-04-20) 20 April 1971 (age 49)
Height1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
Weight79 kg (12 st 6 lb; 174 lb)
School Terenure College, Dublin
University Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Occupation(s)Orthopaedic surgeon
Rugby union career
Position(s) Scrum-half
Senior career
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1997-1998 London Irish 16 (15)
National team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1995-1997 Ireland 13 (5)

Niall Andrew Hogan (born 20 April 1971) is an Irish orthopaedic surgeon and a former Irish rugby union international player who played as a scrum-half. He played for the Ireland team from 1995 to 1997, winning 13 caps. He was a member of the Ireland squad at the 1995 Rugby World Cup where he played in three matches. [1] Hogan is a former Ireland team captain. [2] [3]

Contents

Education

Hogan graduated from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) in 1995 with a degree in medicine (MB BCh LRCP&SI). [4] In 2005, he was conferred with the Intercollegiate Board Specialty Diploma in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery. [5] Hogan is Honorary Secretary to the Irish Institute of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery. [6] His brother Brian Hogan is a radiologist and fellow RCSI graduate.

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References

  1. "Profile". ESPN. Retrieved 30 May 2012.
  2. "Rugby Union: Irish lose contract case". The Independent . 21 December 1999. Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  3. "Trying times". The Irish Times . Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  4. "Search-Results". Medicalcouncil.ie. Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  5. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-03-29. Retrieved 2016-07-29.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-08-07. Retrieved 2016-07-29.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)