Off-tackle run

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Diagram of an off-tackle play. Power o.jpg
Diagram of an off-tackle play.

An off-tackle run in American football is a play in which the running back carries the ball through a running lane off of the tackle's block. The lead block kicks out the end man on the line of scrimmage, and another offensive player usually blocks the linebacker. It can be useful in short yardage situations, [1] and with large backs. [2]

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

In American football a play is a close to the ground "plan of action" or "strategy" used to move the ball down the field. A play begins at either the snap from the center or at kickoff. Most commonly plays occur at the snap during a down. These plays range from basic to very intricate. Football players keep a record of these plays in their playbook.

Running back position in American and Canadian football

A running back (RB) is an American and Canadian football position, a member of the offensive backfield. The primary roles of a running back are to receive handoffs from the quarterback for a rushing play, to catch passes from out of the backfield, and to block. There are usually one or two running backs on the field for a given play, depending on the offensive formation. A running back may be a halfback, a wingback or a fullback. A running back will sometimes be called a "feature back" if he is the team's starting running back.

The most simple form of this play has the strong side offensive lineman step towards the ball and block any defender inside of him. [3] The fullback will kick out the end man to create the running lane for the ball carrier. The Maryland I used the 2nd back to lead through the hole and block the linebacker. More complicated versions of the play have pulling guards block the linebacker or combination blocks by a tight-end and tackle to create the hole and block the linebacker.

History

The off-tackle play is a key feature of the single wing offense. [4]

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References

  1. Hawkes, Dwight (1 January 1995). "Football's Best Offensive Playbook". Human Kinetics via Google Books.
  2. Ingram, Scott (1 June 2004). "A Football All-Pro". Heinemann-Raintree Library via Google Books.
  3. Long, Howie; Czarnecki, John (8 March 2011). "Football For Dummies". John Wiley & Sons via Google Books.
  4. Charles W. Caldwell. Modern Single Wing Football. p. 104.