Quarterback keeper

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Colt McCoy runs a keeper. Colt McCoy on a quarterback keeper vs Rice - 2006-09-16.jpg
Colt McCoy runs a keeper.

A quarterback keeper or keeper in American football is a designed play in which the quarterback does not pass or hand off the ball to another player and instead rushes forward with it in an effort to gain yardage. The play typically is run in instances where only a few yards are needed to gain a first down or touchdown, due to the threat of injury to the quarterback and most quarterbacks' ineffectiveness at running the ball when compared with a running back or fullback; however, this play is called more often with dual-threat quarterbacks. Variations include a quarterback sneak, quarterback sweep or quarterback "power". [1] [2]

This play differs from a quarterback scramble in that a scramble is an improvised play, while the keeper is a designed running play.

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Option offense American football offense style

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Quarterback scramble Impromptu run by a quarterback in gridiron football

A quarterback scramble or scramble is an impromptu maneuver or run in gridiron football by a quarterback. If a quarterback is under pressure by an opposing team's defense, he may run forward, backward, or laterally in an attempt to avoid being tackled behind the line of scrimmage—a quarterback sack. A scramble is not usually a designed play, but instead is the action of a quarterback to avoid being sacked by the defense or an improvised run forward to gain yardage if an opportunity presents itself.

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In American football, a smashmouth offense is an offensive system that relies on a strong running game, where most of the plays run by the offense are handoffs to the fullback or tailback. It is a more traditional style of offense that often results in a higher time of possession by running the ball heavily. So-called "smash-mouth football" is often run out of the I-formation or wishbone, with tight ends and receivers used as blockers. Though the offense is run-oriented, pass opportunities can develop as defenses play close to the line. Play-action can be very effective for a run-oriented team.

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References

  1. Hess, Dillon. "18 QB Sweep (I) – Best Youth Football Plays". bestyouthfootballplays.com. Retrieved 2020-07-11.
  2. Boyd, Ian (2014-10-10). "The modern QB run game". Football Study Hall. Retrieved 2020-07-11.