Paraguayan Navy

Last updated
Paraguayan Navy
Armada Paraguaya
FoundedOfficially since 1811
CountryFlag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay
Type Navy
Size5400 personnel
Part of Armed Forces of Paraguay
Motto(s)Vencer o Morir
(To win or to die)
MarchMarcha al Mariscal Lopez
Anniversaries12th of September
Engagements War of the Triple Alliance
Chaco War
Commanders
Commander of the Paraguayan Navy Admiral Carlos Dionisio [1]
Insignia
Naval Jack Naval Jack of Paraguay.svg

The Paraguayan Navy (Spanish : Armada Paraguaya) is the maritime force of the Armed Forces of Paraguay, in charge of the defense of Paraguay's waters despite not having direct access to the sea.

Contents

It has gone to war on two occasions: the War of the Triple Alliance (1864–1870) against Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay, and the Chaco War (1932-1935) against Bolivia.

Although Paraguay is a landlocked country, it has a strong naval tradition by virtue of the fact that it has access to the Atlantic Ocean through the ParaguayParaná rivers. The Paraguayan Navy has twelve bases. The main base is the Puerto Sajonia in Asuncion, followed by Bahia Negra, Ciudad del Este, Encarnacion, Salto del Guaira. It also has aviation facilities in Puerto Sajonia. [2]

In terms of vessels, the Navy has 34 surface ships, some of which have reached centenarian age. (This is due in part to limited use and floating in fresh water.) The main vessels and the flagship of the Paraguay Navy is still Humaita, which was commissioned prior to Paraguay's involvement in the Chaco War. It has a further four patrol vessels, of which the oldest was commissioned in 1908 and the newest in 1985. The Navy has 17 patrol boats of various drafts, four of which were donated by Taiwan and the United States, while the other 13 were built locally. The rest of the fleet is composed of tugboats, barges, landing craft, transports, and a presidential yacht. The new additions are four Croc-class riverine vessels from Australia, plus 43 locally built riverline patrol vessels constructed from 2006–2009. For air support, one Helibras HB350 helicopter is used to provide SAR, MEDEVAC and utility work [3]

Role

Its main mission is to contribute to the defense of Paraguay, in order to protect and guarantee sovereignty over its water resources.

These priorities include:

Fleet

Flagship, River gunboat ARP C-1 Paraguay Canonero ARP C-1 "Paraguay".jpg
Flagship, River gunboat ARP C-1 Paraguay
CROQ15 alongside Itaipu (P05) CROQ15 Armada Paraguaya.jpg
CROQ15 alongside Itaipú (P05)
Pira 170 SVX patrol class Pira 170.jpg
Pirá 170 SVX patrol class

Gunboats

River patrol ships

Patrol vessels

Tugboats:

Other

AircraftOriginTypeVersionIn service
Helicopters
Helibras HB350 Esquilo Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Transport and light attack helicopterHB350B1
Training aircraft
Cessna 150 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Training aircraft150M2
Utility aircraft
Cessna 210 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Reconnaissance aircraft2101
Cessna 310 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Reconnaissance aircraft3102
Cessna 401 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Transport aircraft4011

Ranks

Commissioned officer ranks

The rank insignia of commissioned officers.

Rank groupGeneral/flag officersField/senior officersJunior officersOfficer cadet
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguayan Navy [5]
Generic-Navy-(star)-O12.svg Generic-Navy-(star)-O11.svg Generic-Navy-(star)-O10.svg Generic-Navy-(star)-O7.svg Generic-Navy-(star)-O5.svg Generic-Navy-(star)-O4.svg Generic-Navy-(star)-O3.svg Generic-Navy-(star)-O2.svg Generic-Navy-(star)-O1.svg Generic-Navy-(star)-O0.svg
Almirante Vicealmirante Contraalmirante Capitán de navío Capitán de fragata Capitán de corbeta Teniente de navio Teniente de fragata Teniente de corbeta Guardiamarina

Other ranks

The rank insignia of non-commissioned officers and enlisted personnel.

Rank groupSenior NCOsJunior NCOsEnlisted
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguayan Navy [5]
Blank.svg Blank.svg Blank.svg Blank.svg Blank.svg Blank.svg Blank.svg No insignia
Sub-oficial principalSub-oficial mayorSub-oficial de primeraSub-oficial de segundaMaestreCabo primeroCabo segundoDragoneante

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Armed Forces of Paraguay</span> Combined military forces of Paraguay

The Armed forces of Paraguay consist of the Paraguayan army, navy and air force.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Brown-water navy</span> Naval force capable of operating in the shallow waters of the littoral zone

The term brown-water navy or riverine navy refers in its broadest sense to any naval force capable of military operations in littoral zone waters. The term originated in the United States Navy during the American Civil War, when it referred to Union forces patrolling the muddy Mississippi River, and has since been used to describe the small gunboats and patrol boats commonly used in rivers, along with the larger "mother ships" that supported them. These mother ships include converted World War II-era Landing Crafts and Tank Landing Ships, among other vessels.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Brazilian Navy</span> Naval warfare branch of Brazils military forces

The Brazilian Navy is the naval service branch of the Brazilian Armed Forces, responsible for conducting naval operations. The Brazilian Navy is the largest navy in Latin America and the second largest navy in the Americas after the United States Navy.

ARA <i>Murature</i> (P-20)

Murature was a 900-ton World War II era Argentine Navy warship, originally classified as minelayer and later as patrol boat. The vessel was named after José Luis Murature, Foreign Minister of Argentina from 1916 to 1918.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Captain (naval)</span> Naval military rank

Captain is the name most often given in English-speaking navies to the rank corresponding to command of the largest ships. The rank is equal to the army rank of colonel and air force rank of group captain.

<i>Sierra</i>-class corvette Corvettes of the Mexican Navy

The Sierra-class corvettes are corvettes of the Mexican Navy intended mainly for interception of drug smugglers, exclusive economic zone (EEZ) patrol, and countering terrorism. The class comprises four ships with the lead ship ARM Sierra commissioned by the Mexican Navy in 1998. One ship, ARM Benito Juárez, was sunk as a target ship in 2007 after being wrecked by fire in 2003. The other three vessels remain in service.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">National Navy of Uruguay</span> Military unit

The National Navy of Uruguay is a branch of the Armed Forces of Uruguay under the direction of the Ministry of National Defense and the commander in chief of the Navy.

ARP <i>Tacuary</i>

ARP Tacuary was a riverine gunboat in service on the Paraguayan Navy for almost a century. She was built in 1907 by T. & J. Hosking, Ireland, as the steel-hulled yacht Clover and initially named Adolfo Riquelme when acquired in 1911. From 1930 the ship bore the name of another gunboat, which was the first Paraguayan naval vessel to cross the Atlantic in 1855.

<i>Humaitá</i>-class gunboat

The Humaitá-class gunboat was a two-unit class of riverine gunboats designed by Paraguayan naval engineer José Bozzano and built in Genoa, Italy, for the Paraguayan Navy from 1928 to 1931. The warships played a key role as fast armed transports during the Chaco War with Bolivia.

ARA <i>King</i> (P-21)

ARA King is a World War II-era Argentine Navy warship, originally classified as minelayer and later as patrol ship. The vessel is named after Juan King, an Argentine naval officer that served in the Cisplatine War. It is the third Argentine naval ship with this name.

ARA <i>Zurubí</i>

ARA Zurubí (P-55) is a patrol boat of the Argentine Navy, built in the Río Santiago Shipyard in 1938 and based in Ushuaia. The vessel is named after the Surubí, a catfish that inhabits Argentina’s Mesopotamia, and is the first Argentine naval ship with this name.

ARA Azopardo was a tugboat of the Argentine Navy, built in the Bethlehem Shipyard in 1919 and transferred to Argentina in 1922. It was based at the port of Buenos Aires and later at Puerto Belgrano, and was decommissioned in 1941. The vessel was named after the Juan Bautista Azopardo, a Maltese privateer and officer of the Argentine Navy during the Independence and Cisplatine wars, and was the second Argentine naval ship with this name.

ARA Azopardo was a steam transport of the Argentine Navy, built in the Stabilimento Tecnico Triestino and sold to Argentina in 1884. It was based, among others, in the port of Buenos Aires and later Ushuaia, and was decommissioned in 1922 after being sunk in an accident; it was refloated and sunk in 1924 as a target. The vessel was named after the Juan Bautista Azopardo, a Maltese privateer and officer of the Argentine Navy during the Independence and Cisplatine wars, and was the first Argentine naval ship with this name.

<i>Murature</i>-class patrol ship

The Murature-class patrol ships are a class of World War II era Argentine Navy warships, originally classified as minelayers and later reclassified as patrol ships. The class is named after José Luis Murature, Foreign Minister of Argentina from 1916 to 1918.

<i>Bouchard</i>-class minesweeper

The Bouchard-class minesweepers were a class of nine minesweepers, designed and built in Argentina, in service with the Argentine Navy from 1937 to the late 1960s. One of the class was lost after running aground in the Straits of Magellan and the remaining eight were discarded. Three were transferred to the Paraguayan Navy and remained in service as of late 1990s. In Paraguayan service, they were used for river patrol work. One of the class was docked in Asunción, Peru in 2009 with the intention of converting the vessel to a museum ship

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Pedro Ignacio Meza</span>

Pedro Ignacio Meza was a Paraguayan commodore who commanded the Paraguayan Navy in the early years of the War of the Triple Alliance until his death at the Battle of the Riachuelo.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Assault on the battleships Barroso and Rio Grande</span> Battle in the Paraguayan War

The assault on the battleship Barroso and the monitor Rio Grande, also known as assault on the battleships at Tagy, was a Paraguayan naval operation carried out during the Paraguayan War. The Imperial Brazilian Navy was present in the main actions of the allied forces. President Francisco Solano López knew of the threat that the navy posed and wanted to capture some of its ships, the ironclads. The seizure was also seen as a form of compensation for the losses incurred as a result of the war. Assault plans were created and executed in 1868.

References

  1. "Armada Paraguaya :: COMANDANTE".
  2. "Armada Paraguaya :: Misión y Visión". www.armadaparaguaya.mil.py. Retrieved 2021-12-29.
  3. "World Air Forces 2020" . Flightglobal Insight. 2020. Retrieved 1 March 2020.
  4. www.histarmar.com.ar http://www.histarmar.com.ar/ArmadasExtranjeras/Paraguay/ARPHumaita.htm . Retrieved 2021-12-30.{{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. 1 2 Cooke, Melinda W. (1990). "Chapter 5: National Security". In Hanratty, Dennis M.; Meditz, Sandra W. (eds.). Paraguay: A Country Study. Area Handbook Series (2nd ed.). Library of Congress. pp. 216–217. LCCN   89600299 . Retrieved 5 October 2021.