Paul Miller (defensive end)

Last updated
Paul Miller
No. 81, 86, 85
Position: Defensive end
Personal information
Born:(1930-11-08)November 8, 1930
Mandeville, Louisiana
Died:January 24, 2007(2007-01-24) (aged 76)
Career information
College: LSU
NFL Draft: 1953  / Round: 6 / Pick: 64
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:78
Interceptions:1
Fumble recoveries:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Paul William Miller Jr. (November 8, 1930 – January 24, 2007) was an American football defensive end in the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL). He played for the NFL's Los Angeles Rams (1954–1957) and the AFL's Dallas Texans (1960–1961) and San Diego Chargers (1962). He played college football at Louisiana State University.


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