Phaegopterina

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Phaegopterina
Halysidota tessellarisPCCA20050528-7821B.jpg
Pale tiger moth
(Halysidota tessellaris)
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Superfamily: Noctuoidea
Family: Erebidae
Subfamily: Arctiinae
Tribe: Arctiini
Subtribe: Phaegopterina
Kirby, 1892

The Phaegopterina are a subtribe of tiger moths in the tribe Arctiini, which is part of the family Erebidae. The subtribe was described by William Forsell Kirby in 1892. 469 species of Phaegopterina are present and 52 that are recently discovered in Brazil. [1]

Contents

Taxonomic history

The subtribe was previously classified as the tribe Phaegopterini of the family Arctiidae.

In 2002, Jacobson & Weller proposed a clade Euchaetes within Arctiini. [2] In 2010, V. V. Dubatolov proposed that this clade should be classified as subtribe Euchaetina, containing eight arctiini genera, including Euchaetes . [3] However, the name Euchaetina does not appear in the comprehensive 2010 checklist assembled by J. Donald Lafontaine and B. Christian Schmidt, nor its later updated versions, which place those genera under Phaegopterina. [4] [5] [6] [7]

Genera

The following genera are included in the subtribe. Numerous arctiine genera have not yet been assigned to a subtribe, so this genus list may be incomplete.

Related Research Articles

Noctuidae Type of moths commonly known as owlet moths, cutworms or armyworms

The Noctuidae, commonly known as owlet moths, cutworms or armyworms, are the most controversial family in the superfamily Noctuoidea because many of the clades are constantly changing, along with the other families of the Noctuoidea. It was considered the largest family in Lepidoptera for a long time, but after regrouping Lymantriinae, Catocalinae and Calpinae within the family Erebidae, the latter holds this title now. Currently, Noctuidae is the second largest family in Noctuoidea, with about 1,089 genera and 11,772 species. However, this classification is still contingent, as more changes continue to appear between Noctuidae and Erebidae.

Arctiinae Subfamily of moths

The Arctiinae are a large and diverse subfamily of moths with around 11,000 species found all over the world, including 6,000 neotropical species. This subfamily includes the groups commonly known as tiger moths, which usually have bright colours, footmen, which are usually much drabber, lichen moths, and wasp moths. Many species have "hairy" caterpillars that are popularly known as woolly bears or woolly worms. The scientific name Arctiinae refers to this hairiness. Some species within the Arctiinae have the word "tussock"' in their common names because they have been misidentified as members of the Lymantriinae subfamily based on the characteristics of the larvae.

Ophiusini Tribe of moths

The Ophiusini are a tribe of moths in the family Erebidae.

Ctenuchina Subtribe of moths

The Ctenuchina are a subtribe of moths in the family Erebidae.

Arctia churkini is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Saldaitis, Ivinskis and Witt in 2003 and is endemic to Kyrgyzstan.

Apantesis allectans is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Douglas C. Ferguson in 1985. It is found in the Mexican states of Durango and Sonora and the Chiricahua Mountains of southern Arizona in the United States. The habitat consists of open montane pine forests.

Apantesis blakei, or Blake's tiger moth, is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Augustus Radcliffe Grote in 1864. It is found on the North American Great Plains, from the southern prairie provinces of Canada south to US states of Texas and western Colorado. The habitat consists of sandy prairie, including overgrazed native pastures.

Apantesis complicata is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Francis Walker in 1865. It is found on south-eastern Vancouver Island and several Gulf Islands of British Columbia and Washington. The habitat consists of dry Garry oak meadows and sandy beaches.

Apantesis fergusoni is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Schmidt in 2009. It is found in the central Sierra Nevada and White Mountains of California. The habitat consists of subalpine and alpine areas.

Apantesis franconia is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Henry Edwards in 1888. It is found in northeastern North America. The habitat consists of dry, rocky, or sandy areas, including pine barrens.

Apantesis incorrupta is an arctiine moth in the family Erebidae, described by Henry Edwards in 1881. It is found from southern Colorado and south-eastern Kansas south through Arizona, New Mexico and western Texas into Mexico and west to south-eastern California. The habitat consists of grasslands and open woodlands.

Apantesis kodara is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Vladimir Viktorovitch Dubatolov and B. Christian Schmidt in 2005. It is found in the Kodar Mountains in Chita Province, Russia.

Apantesis williamsii, or Williams' tiger moth, is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Charles R. Dodge in 1871. It is found in North America from the Northwest Territories east to the northern Great Lakes region, New Brunswick and New England. It also occurs throughout the northern Great Plains, south at higher elevations to Arizona and New Mexico, west to south-eastern British Columbia and eastern California.

Apantesis yavapai is a moth of the subfamily Arctiinae. It was described by Schmidt in 2009. It is only found in the San Francisco volcanic field in Coconino County, Arizona.

Apantesis yukona is a moth of the subfamily Arctiinae. It was described by Schmidt in 2009. It is found in Yukon. The habitat consists of dry, rocky or eroding south-facing slopes.

Chelis marinae is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Vladimir Viktorovitch Dubatolov in 1985. It is found in Russia.

<i>Chelis puengeleri</i> Species of moth

Chelis puengeleri is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Otto Bang-Haas in 1927. It is found in northern Scandinavia, Russia, Mongolia and Alaska.

Chelis lafontainei is a moth of the family Erebidae. It was described by Douglas C. Ferguson in 1995. It is found in Canada's Northwest Territories.

Arctia murzini is a moth in the family Erebidae. It was described by Vladimir Viktorovitch Dubatolov in 2005. It is found in Shaanxi, China.

Pseudorgyia russula is a species of moth in the family Erebidae. It is found in North America.

References

  1. Teston, José A.; Ferro, Viviane G. (2016-03-09). "Arctiini Leach, [1815] (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae) of the Brazilian Amazon. I — Subtribe Phaegopterina Kirby, 1892". Check List. 12 (2): 1852. doi: 10.15560/12.2.1852 . ISSN   1809-127X.
  2. Jacobson NL & Weller SJ (2002) A cladistic study of the Arctiidae (Lepidoptera) by using characters of immatures and adults. Thomas Say publications in entomology: 1-98, Entomologica Society of America: Lanham, Maryland.
  3. Dubatolov VV (2010) Tiger-moths of Eurasia (Lepidoptera, Arctiidae) (Nyctemerini by Rob de Vos & Vladimir V. Dubatolov). Neue Entomologische Nachrichten 65:1-106
  4. Donald, Lafontaine; Schmidt, B. (2010-03-19). "Annotated check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico". ZooKeys. 40. doi:10.3897/zookeys.40.414.
  5. Lafontaine, J. Donald; Schmidt, B. Christian (2015-10-15). "Additions and corrections to the check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico III". ZooKeys (527): 127–147. doi:10.3897/zookeys.527.6151. ISSN   1313-2989. PMC   4668890 . PMID   26692790.
  6. Lafontaine, J. Donald; Schmidt, B. Christian (2013-02-06). "Additions and corrections to the check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico". ZooKeys (264): 227–236. doi:10.3897/zookeys.264.4443. ISSN   1313-2989. PMC   3668382 . PMID   23730184.
  7. Lafontaine, J. Donald; Schmidt, B. Christian (2011-11-24). "Additions and corrections to the check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico". ZooKeys (149): 145–161. doi:10.3897/zookeys.149.1805. ISSN   1313-2989. PMC   3234417 . PMID   22207802.