Phoenix Open

Last updated
Phoenix Open
Phoenix Open logo.png
Tournament information
Location Scottsdale, Arizona
Established1932, 87 years ago
Course(s) TPC Scottsdale
Par71
Length7,266 yards (6,644 m)
Organized byThe Thunderbirds
Tour(s) PGA Tour
Format Stroke play
Prize fund $7.1 million
Month playedFebruary
Tournament record score
Aggregate256 Mark Calcavecchia (2001)
256 Phil Mickelson (2013)
To par−28 Mark Calcavecchia (2001)
−28 Phil Mickelson (2013)
Current champion
Flag of the United States.svg Rickie Fowler
USA Arizona location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Scottsdale

The Phoenix Open (known as the Waste Management Phoenix Open for title sponsorship reasons) [1] is a professional golf tournament on the PGA Tour, held in late January/early February at the Tournament Players Club (TPC) of Scottsdale, Arizona.

Golf sport in which players attempt to hit a ball with a club into a goal using a minimum number of shots

Golf is a club-and-ball sport in which players use various clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a course in as few strokes as possible.

PGA Tour golf tour in the United States

The PGA Tour is the organizer of the main professional golf tours played primarily by men in the United States and North America. It organizes most of the events on the flagship annual series of tournaments also known as the PGA Tour, as well as PGA Tour Champions and the Web.com Tour, as well as PGA Tour Canada, PGA Tour Latinoamérica, and PGA Tour China. The PGA Tour is a nonprofit organization headquartered in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, a suburb of Jacksonville.

Tournament Players Club Chain of private and public golf courses

Tournament Players Club (TPC) is a chain of public and private golf courses operated by the PGA Tour. Most of the courses either are or have been hosts for PGA Tour events, with the remainder having frequently hosted events on the second-tier Web.com Tour or the over-50s PGA Tour Champions.

Contents

The tournament was originally the Arizona Open, but was known for most of its history as the Phoenix Open until the investment bank Friedman Billings Ramsey became the title sponsor in October 2003, and it was known as the FBR Open for the next six editions. Waste Management began its sponsorship in 2010.

The event's relaxed atmosphere, raucous by the standards of professional golf, has earned it the nickname “The Greatest Show on Grass” and made it one of the most popular events on the PGA Tour calendar.

History

The Phoenix Open began 87 years ago in 1932 but was discontinued after the 1935 tournament. The rebirth of the Phoenix Open came in 1939 when Bob Goldwater, Sr. convinced fellow Thunderbirds to help run the event. The Thunderbirds, a prominent civic organization in Phoenix, were not as enthusiastic about running the event as he was, leaving Goldwater, Sr. to do most of the work in getting a golf open started.

Phoenix, Arizona State capital city in Arizona, United States

Phoenix is the capital and most populous city of Arizona, with 1,626,000 people. It is also the fifth most populous city in the United States, and the most populous American state capital, and the only state capital with a population of more than one million residents.

The event was played at the Phoenix Country Club in Phoenix ( 33°28′55″N112°03′47″W / 33.482°N 112.063°W / 33.482; -112.063 ), [2] both in its earlier incarnations and after Goldwater resuscitated it. Beginning in 1955, the Arizona Country Club (also in Phoenix) ( 33°29′06″N111°57′32″W / 33.485°N 111.959°W / 33.485; -111.959 ), [3] alternated as event host with Phoenix Country Club; this arrangement lasted until Phoenix Country Club took The Arizona Country Club's turn in 1975 and became the event's permanent home again.

Phoenix Country Club is a country club located in Phoenix, Arizona. The club was founded in 1900 and was moved to its current location in 1921. Golf Connoisseur Magazine rated Phoenix Country Club among top 100 Most Prestigious Private Clubs in America in 2006. The Club was chosen for the “ultimate mix of course, history, membership, tradition and class.” In 2009 and again in 2014, Phoenix Country Club was selected by its peers as a Platinum Club of America. The original golf course designed by Harry Collis was redesigned by Tom Lehman and John Fought in 2002.

The tournament moved 32 years ago in 1987 to its current home, the Stadium Course at TPC Scottsdale, northeast of downtown Phoenix. The approximate average elevation of the course is 1,530 feet (465 m) above sea level.

The 1987 PGA Tour season was played from January 7 to November 1. The season consisted of 46 official money events. The Nabisco Championship debuted as season finale, with the top 30 players fighting for a US$360,000 first prize and a total US$2.0 million purse. Paul Azinger and Curtis Strange won the most tournaments, three, and there were 10 first-time winners. The tournament results, leaders, and award winners are listed below.

TPC Scottsdale 36-hole golf complex located in Scottsdale, Arizona

TPC Scottsdale is a 36-hole golf complex in the southwestern United States, located in Scottsdale, Arizona, northeast of Phoenix.

Elevation Height of a geographic location above a fixed reference point

The elevation of a geographic location is its height above or below a fixed reference point, most commonly a reference geoid, a mathematical model of the Earth's sea level as an equipotential gravitational surface . The term elevation is mainly used when referring to points on the Earth's surface, while altitude or geopotential height is used for points above the surface, such as an aircraft in flight or a spacecraft in orbit, and depth is used for points below the surface.

Popularity

The four-day attendance of the tournament is usually around a half million, the best-attended event in golf. In 2016, it set a PGA Tour and Phoenix Open single day attendance record with 201,003 fans in attendance on Saturday, February 6 and set a tournament week attendance record of 618,365 fans. [4]

The most popular location for spectators is the par-3 16th hole, nicknamed "The Coliseum." ( 33°38′15″N111°54′48″W / 33.6375°N 111.9132°W / 33.6375; -111.9132 ) One of the shortest holes on tour at 162 yards (148 m), it is enclosed by a temporary 20,000-seat grandstand. The hole could be described as "one big party," with many students from the nearby Arizona State University in Tempe in attendance. Poor shots at the 16th hole receive boos, because the hole is very easy by the PGA's standards. Good shots, however, are cheered loudly. Famous moments include Tiger Woods' Saturday hole-in-one in 1997, which caused the gallery to erupt, throwing cups and other objects in celebration, [5] and Justin Leonard giving the finger to the gallery after a poor shot. Jarrod Lyle aced the hole on Saturday in 2011, causing the stands to erupt in excitement. After 2013, the PGA Tour banned the practice of caddies racing the 150 yards (140 m) from the tee box to the green, citing injury concerns. [6]

The most popular tour player at the Phoenix Open is unquestionably Phil Mickelson, an Arizona State alumnus (1992) with three victories at the event. In addition to the golf, there is a concert/party held in the Scottsdale area called the Birds Nest, at which music artists like Huey Lewis and the News play.

The Thunderbirds are still highly active in the organization of the tournament. Portions of the proceeds are used by the Thunderbirds to fund Special Olympics activities in Phoenix.

Conflicts with the Super Bowl

Since 1973, [7] the Phoenix Open has been played on the weekend of the Super Bowl. In 1996, it was played Wednesday through Saturday, as Super Bowl XXX was held at Sun Devil Stadium in nearby Tempe. [8] In 2009, the tournament overlapped with Super Bowl XLIII in Tampa, Florida, when Kenny Perry and Charley Hoffman went to a playoff. That denied the spectators a chance to watch the beginning of the game on NBC, which featured the local Arizona Cardinals.

Because of the Super Bowl weekend status, the PGA Tour's television contracts with CBS and NBC include an alternating tournament. Usually a CBS tournament, the Phoenix Open airs on NBC when CBS has the Super Bowl, and NBC's Honda Classic airs on CBS in Winter Olympic years.

Records – scoring and victories

The tournament's lowest 72-hole score was set by Mark Calcavecchia in 2001 with 256 (–28), which was matched by Mickelson in 2013. In the second round Calcavecchia scored a 60 (–11), which equalled the lowest score at the Phoenix Open (by Grant Waite in 1996) and subsequently matched by Mickelson in 2005 and 2013. Calcavecchia had 32 birdies in the tournament, which was also an all-time record.

There have been only two double eagles in the history of the Phoenix Open. Tom Pernice, Jr. made the first one on the 558-yard (510 m) par-5 15th hole in 1990. Andrew Magee scored the second on the 332-yard (304 m) par-4 17th hole in 2001, and was the first-ever ace on a par-4 in PGA Tour history. [9]

Four men have won three times at the Phoenix Open: Arnold Palmer won consecutively (1961, 1962, 1963), [10] [11] then Gene Littler (1955, 1959, 1969), Calcavecchia (1989, 1992, 2001), and Mickelson (1996, 2005, 2013).

Winners

YearPlayerCountryScoreTo parMargin
of victory
Runner(s)-upWinner's
share ($)
Purse ($)
Waste Management Phoenix Open
2019 Rickie Fowler Flag of the United States.svg  United States 267−172 strokes Flag of South Africa.svg Branden Grace 1,278,0007,100,000
2018 Gary Woodland Flag of the United States.svg  United States 266−18Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Chez Reavie 1,242,0006,900,000
2017 Hideki Matsuyama (2)Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 267−17Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Webb Simpson 1,206,0006,700,000
2016 Hideki Matsuyama Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 270−14Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Rickie Fowler 1,170,0006,500,000
2015 Brooks Koepka Flag of the United States.svg  United States 269−151 stroke Flag of Japan.svg Hideki Matsuyama
Flag of the United States.svg Ryan Palmer
Flag of the United States.svg Bubba Watson
1,134,0006,300,000
2014 Kevin Stadler Flag of the United States.svg  United States 268−161 stroke Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Graham DeLaet
Flag of the United States.svg Bubba Watson
1,116,0006,200,000
2013 Phil Mickelson (3)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 256−284 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Brandt Snedeker 1,116,0006,200,000
2012 Kyle Stanley Flag of the United States.svg  United States 269−151 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Ben Crane 1,098,0006,100,000
2011 Mark Wilson Flag of the United States.svg  United States 266−18Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Jason Dufner 1,098,0006,100,000
2010 Hunter Mahan Flag of the United States.svg  United States 268−161 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Rickie Fowler 1,080,0006,000,000
FBR Open
2009 Kenny Perry Flag of the United States.svg  United States 270−14Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Charley Hoffman 1,080,0006,000,000
2008 J. B. Holmes (2)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 270−14Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Phil Mickelson 1,080,0006,000,000
2007 Aaron Baddeley Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 263−211 stroke Flag of the United States.svg John Rollins 1,080,0006,000,000
2006 J. B. Holmes Flag of the United States.svg  United States 263−217 strokes Flag of the United States.svg J. J. Henry
Flag of the United States.svg Steve Lowery
Flag of the United States.svg Ryan Palmer
Flag of the United States.svg Scott Verplank
Flag of Colombia.svg Camilo Villegas
936,0005,200,000
2005 Phil Mickelson (2)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 267−175 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Scott McCarron
Flag of the United States.svg Kevin Na
936,0005,200,000
2004 Jonathan Kaye Flag of the United States.svg  United States 266−182 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Chris DiMarco 936,0005,200,000
Phoenix Open
2003 Vijay Singh (2)Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 261−233 strokes Flag of the United States.svg John Huston 720,0004,000,000
2002 Chris DiMarco Flag of the United States.svg  United States 267−171 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Kenny Perry
Flag of Japan.svg Kaname Yokoo
720,0004,000,000
2001 Mark Calcavecchia (3)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 256−288 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Rocco Mediate 720,0004,000,000
2000 Tom Lehman Flag of the United States.svg  United States 270−141 stroke Flag of Australia.svg Robert Allenby
Flag of the United States.svg Rocco Mediate
576,0003,200,000
1999 Rocco Mediate Flag of the United States.svg  United States 273−112 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Justin Leonard 540,0003,000,000
1998 Jesper Parnevik Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 269−153 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Tommy Armour III
Flag of the United States.svg Brent Geiberger
Flag of the United States.svg Steve Pate
Flag of the United States.svg Tom Watson
450,0002,500,000
1997 Steve Jones Flag of the United States.svg  United States 258−2611 strokes Flag of Sweden.svg Jesper Parnevik 270,0001,500,000
1996 Phil Mickelson Flag of the United States.svg  United States 269−15Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Justin Leonard 234,0001,300,000
1995 Vijay Singh Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 269−15Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Billy Mayfair 234,0001,300,000
1994 Bill Glasson Flag of the United States.svg  United States 268−163 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Bob Estes 216,0001,200,000
1993 Lee Janzen Flag of the United States.svg  United States 273−112 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Andrew Magee 180,0001,000,000
1992 Mark Calcavecchia (2)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 264−205 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Duffy Waldorf 180,0001,000,000
1991 Nolan Henke Flag of the United States.svg  United States 268−161 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Gil Morgan
Flag of the United States.svg Curtis Strange
Flag of the United States.svg Tom Watson
180,0001,000,000
1990 Tommy Armour III Flag of the United States.svg  United States 267−175 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Jim Thorpe 162,000900,000
1989 Mark Calcavecchia Flag of the United States.svg  United States 263−217 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Chip Beck 126,000700,000
1988 Sandy Lyle Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 269−15Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Fred Couples 117,000650,000
1987 Paul Azinger Flag of the United States.svg  United States 268−161 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Hal Sutton 108,000600,000
1986 Hal Sutton Flag of the United States.svg  United States 267−172 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Calvin Peete
Flag of the United States.svg Tony Sills
90,000500,000
1985 Calvin Peete Flag of the United States.svg  United States 270−142 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Morris Hatalsky
Flag of the United States.svg Doug Tewell
81,000450,000
1984 Tom Purtzer Flag of the United States.svg  United States 268−161 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Corey Pavin 72,000400,000
1983 Bob Gilder (2)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 271−13Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Rex Caldwell
Flag of the United States.svg Johnny Miller
Flag of the United States.svg Mark O'Meara
63,000350,000
1982 Lanny Wadkins Flag of the United States.svg  United States 263−216 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Jerry Pate 54,000300,000
1981 David Graham Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 268−161 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Lon Hinkle 54,000300,000
1980 Jeff Mitchell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 272−124 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Rik Massengale 54,000300,000
1979 Ben Crenshaw Flag of the United States.svg  United States 199*−141 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Jay Haas 33,750250,000
1978 Miller Barber Flag of the United States.svg  United States 272−121 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Jerry Pate
Flag of the United States.svg Lee Trevino
40,000200,000
1977 Jerry Pate Flag of the United States.svg  United States 277−7Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Dave Stockton 40,000200,000
1976 Bob Gilder Flag of the United States.svg  United States 268−162 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Roger Maltbie 40,000200,000
1975 Johnny Miller (2)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 260−2414 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Jerry Heard 30,000150,000
1974 Johnny Miller Flag of the United States.svg  United States 271−131 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Lanny Wadkins 30,000150,000
1973 Bruce Crampton Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 268−121 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Steve Melnyk
Flag of the United States.svg Lanny Wadkins
30,000150,000
1972 Homero Blancas Flag of the United States.svg  United States 273−11Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Lanny Wadkins 25,000125,000
Phoenix Open Invitational
1971 Miller Barber Flag of the United States.svg  United States 261−232 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Billy Casper
Flag of the United States.svg Dan Sikes
25,000125,000
1970 Dale Douglass Flag of the United States.svg  United States 271−131 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Howie Johnson
Flag of the United States.svg Gene Littler
20,000100,000
1969 Gene Littler (3)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 263−212 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Miller Barber
Flag of the United States.svg Don January
Flag of the United States.svg Billy Maxwell
20,000100,000
1968 George Knudson Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 272−123 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Julius Boros
Flag of the United States.svg Sam Carmichael
Flag of the United States.svg Jack Montgomery
20,000100,000
1967 Julius Boros Flag of the United States.svg  United States 272−121 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Ken Still 14,00070,000
1966 Dudley Wysong Flag of the United States.svg  United States 278−61 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Gardner Dickinson 9,00060,000
1965 Rod Funseth Flag of the United States.svg  United States 274−143 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Bert Yancey 10,50065,000
1964 Jack Nicklaus Flag of the United States.svg  United States 271−133 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Bob Brue 7,50050,000
1963 Arnold Palmer (3)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 273−151 stroke Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Gary Player 5,30035,000
1962 Arnold Palmer (2)Flag of the United States.svg  United States 269−1512 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Billy Casper
Flag of the United States.svg Don Fairfield
Flag of the United States.svg Bob McCallister
Flag of the United States.svg Jack Nicklaus
5,30035,000
1961 Arnold Palmer Flag of the United States.svg  United States 270−10Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Doug Sanders 4,30030,000
1960 Jack Fleck Flag of the United States (1959-1960).svg  United States 273−11Playoff Flag of the United States (1959-1960).svg Bill Collins 3,15022,500
1959 Gene Littler (2)Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 268−121 stroke Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Art Wall, Jr. 2,40020,000
1958 Ken Venturi Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 274−101 stroke Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Walter Burkemo
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Jay Hebert
2,00015,000
1957 Billy Casper Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 271−93 strokes Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Cary Middlecoff
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Mike Souchak
2,00015,000
Phoenix Open
1956 Cary Middlecoff Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 276−83 strokes Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Mike Souchak 2,40015,000
1955 Gene Littler Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 275−51 stroke Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Billy Maxwell
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Johnny Palmer
2,40015,000
1954 Ed Furgol Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 272−12Playoff Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Cary Middlecoff 2,00010,000
1953 Lloyd Mangrum (2)Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 272−126 strokes Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Johnny Bulla
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Ted Kroll
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Bo Wininger
2,00010,000
1952 Lloyd Mangrum Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 274−105 strokes Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg E. J. Harrison 2,00010,000
1951 Lew Worsham Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 272−121 stroke Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Lawson Little 2,00010,000
Ben Hogan Open
1950 Jimmy Demaret (2)Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 269−151 stroke Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Sam Snead 2,00010,000
Phoenix Open
1949 Jimmy Demaret Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 278−6Playoff Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Ben Hogan 2,00010,000
1948 Bobby Locke Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg  South Africa 268−161 stroke Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Jimmy Demaret 2,00010,000
1947 Ben Hogan (2)Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 270−147 strokes Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Lloyd Mangrum
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Ed Oliver
2,00010,000
1946 Ben Hogan Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 273−11Playoff Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Herman Keiser 1,5007,500
1945 Byron Nelson (2)Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 274−102 strokes Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Denny Shute 1,0005,000
1944 Jug McSpaden Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 273−11Playoff Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Byron Nelson 1,0005,000
1941–43: No tournament (hosted Western Open in 1941 and 1942)
1940 Ed Oliver Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 205^−81 stroke Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Ben Hogan 7003,000
1939 Byron Nelson Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 198^−1512 strokes Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Ben Hogan 7003,000
1936–38: No tournament
1935 Ky Laffoon Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 281−34 strokes Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Craig Wood 5002,500
1934No tournament
Arizona Open
1933 Harry Cooper Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 281−32 strokes Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Ray Mangrum
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Horton Smith
4001,500
1932 Ralph Guldahl Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 285−15 strokes Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg John Perelli 6002,500

*Rain-shortened to 54 holes
^Scheduled 54 holes
Note: Green highlight indicates scoring records.
Sources [12] [13] [14]

Multiple winners

Fourteen men have won this tournament more than once.

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References

  1. "Waste Management to sponsor Phoenix Open". PGA Tour. December 9, 2009. Retrieved March 13, 2013.
  2. "Golf". Phoenix Country Club. Retrieved February 4, 2017.
  3. "Golf". Arizona Country Club. Retrieved February 4, 2017.
  4. "Waste Management Phoenix Open attendance records". AZ Central. February 7, 2016.
  5. "Jones maintains Phoenix lead; Woods records ace on No. 16". Victoria Advocate. (Texas). January 26, 1997. p. 6B.
  6. http://www.golfchannel.com/news/golftalkcentral/tour-bans-caddie-races-tpc-scottsdale-colonial/
  7. "Crampton's birdie nets Phoenix win". Wilmington Morning Star. (North Carolina). Associated Press. January 15, 1973. p. 16.
  8. "Mickelson grinds out another win". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. January 28, 1996. p. 3F.
  9. Kelley, Brent. "The Amazing Story of the Only Par-4 Hole-in-One in PGA Tour History". thoughtco.com. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  10. 1 2 "Bee 'helps' Palmer win Phoenix Open". Pittsburgh Press. UPI. February 13, 1963. p. 50.
  11. 1 2 "Palmer wins Phoenix Open". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. February 13, 1963. p. 1C.
  12. 2015 Waste Management Phoenix Open Media Guide – Section 14: Top Finishers 1932–2014 – at wmphoenixopen.com
  13. Phoenix Open – Winners Archived 2014-06-01 at the Wayback Machine – at www.pgatour.com
  14. Phoenix Open – Winners – at golfobserver.com
  15. "Hogan wins Phoenix Open; trouble looms". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). United Press. January 27, 1947. p. 5.
  16. "Ben Hogan wins Phoenix tourney". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). Associated Press. January 27, 1947. p. 13.
  17. "Demaret winner of Phoenix golf". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). Associated Press. January 30, 1950. p. 11.
  18. "Miller shoots 64 for 14-shot edge". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). Associated Press. January 13, 1975. p. 13.
  19. "Miller maybe world's best". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). UPI. January 13, 1975. p. 8B.

Coordinates: 33°38′N111°55′W / 33.64°N 111.91°W / 33.64; -111.91