Raymond James Stadium

Last updated

Raymond James Stadium
"Ray Jay"
Raymond James Stadium logo.png
Raymond James Stadium02.JPG
Raymond James Stadium, 2007
USA Florida relief location map.jpg
Red pog.svg
Raymond James Stadium
Location in Florida
Usa edcp relief location map.png
Red pog.svg
Raymond James Stadium
Location in the United States
Address4201 North Dale Mabry Highway
Location Tampa, Florida
Coordinates 27°58′33″N82°30′12″W / 27.97583°N 82.50333°W / 27.97583; -82.50333 Coordinates: 27°58′33″N82°30′12″W / 27.97583°N 82.50333°W / 27.97583; -82.50333
Owner Hillsborough County
OperatorTampa Sports Authority
Executive suites195
Capacity
  • 65,618 (2016–present) (expandable to 75,000)
  • 65,890 (2013–2015)
  • 65,856 (2008–2012)
  • 65,657 (2001–2007)
  • 66,321 (1998–2000)
Record attendance
  • 74,512 (2017 CFP National Championship Game)
Surface Tifway 419 Bermuda
Construction
Broke groundOctober 15, 1996 [1]
OpenedSeptember 20, 1998
Construction costUS$168.5 million
($259 million in 2018 dollars) [2]
ArchitectWagner Murray Architects
Populous (then HOK Sport)
Structural engineer Walter P Moore
Bliss and Nyitray, Inc.
Services engineerFSC-Inc. [3]
General contractorManhattan Construction, Hunt/Metric Joint Venture [4]
Tenants
Tampa Bay Buccaneers (NFL) (1998–present)
South Florida Bulls (NCAA) (1998–present)
Tampa Bay Mutiny (MLS) (1999–2001)
Outback Bowl (NCAA) (1999–present)
Gasparilla Bowl (NCAA) (2017–present)
Tampa Bay (XFL) (from 2020)
Website
raymondjamesstadium.com

Raymond James Stadium, also known as "Ray Jay", [5] is a multi-purpose football stadium located in Tampa, Florida. It is home to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL) as well as the NCAA's South Florida Bulls football team. The stadium seats 65,618. [6] With the addition of temporary seating, it can be expanded to 75,000 for special events.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Tampa, Florida City in Central Florida

Tampa is a major city in, and the county seat of, Hillsborough County, Florida, United States. It is on the west coast of Florida on Tampa Bay, near the Gulf of Mexico, and is the largest city in the Tampa Bay Area. The bay's port is the largest in the state, near downtown's Channel District. Bayshore Boulevard runs along the bay, and is east of the historic Hyde Park neighborhood.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers National Football League franchise in Tampa, Florida

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers are a professional American football franchise based in Tampa, Florida. The Buccaneers currently compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member team of the National Football Conference (NFC) South division. Along with the Seattle Seahawks, the team joined the NFL in 1976 as an expansion team. The Bucs played their first season in the American Football Conference (AFC) West division as part of the 1976 expansion plan, whereby each new franchise would play every other franchise over the first two years. After the season, the club switched conferences with the Seahawks and became a member of the NFC Central division. During the 2002 league realignment, the Bucs joined three former NFC West teams to form the NFC South. The club is owned by the Glazer family, and plays its home games at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.

Contents

Raymond James Stadium hosted Super Bowls XXXV and XLIII, as well as the 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship. It is also set to host WrestleMania 36 on April 5, 2020 and Super Bowl LV in February 2021.

Super Bowl Annual championship game of the National Football League in American football

The Super Bowl is the annual championship game of the National Football League (NFL) where the champion of the National Football Conference (NFC) competes against the champion of the American Football Conference (AFC). The game is the culmination of a regular season that begins in the late summer of the previous calendar year. Normally, Roman numerals are used to identify each game, rather than the year in which it is held. For example, Super Bowl I was played on January 15, 1967, following the 1966 regular season. The sole exception to this naming convention tradition occurred with Super Bowl 50, which was played on February 7, 2016, following the 2015 regular season, and the following year, the nomenclature returned to Roman numerals for Super Bowl LI, following the 2016 regular season. The upcoming Super Bowl is Super Bowl LIV, scheduled for February 2, 2020, following the 2019 regular season.

Super Bowl XXXV

Super Bowl XXXV was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Baltimore Ravens and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion New York Giants to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2000 season. The Ravens defeated the Giants by the score of 34–7, tied for the seventh largest Super Bowl margin of victory with Super Bowl XXXVII. The game was played on January 28, 2001 at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida.

Super Bowl XLIII super bowl XLIII

Super Bowl XLIII was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champions Pittsburgh Steelers and the National Football Conference (NFC) champions Arizona Cardinals to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2008 season. The Steelers defeated the Cardinals by the score of 27–23. The game was played on February 1, 2009 at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida.

History

Raymond James Stadium was built to replace Tampa Stadium at the demand of the new Bucs owner Malcolm Glazer. It is located adjacent to the site of the old stadium on the former location of Al Lopez Field, a minor-league baseball stadium that had been demolished in 1989. Once completed, the final cost of the new stadium was $168.5 million, with the entire cost publicly financed. [7]

Tampa Stadium

Tampa Stadium was a large open-air stadium located in Tampa, Florida. It opened in 1967, was significantly expanded in 1974–75, and was demolished in 1999. The facility is most closely associated with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League, who played there from their establishment in 1976 until 1997. It also hosted two Super Bowls, in 1984 and 1991, as well as the 1984 USFL Championship Game.

Malcolm Glazer American businessman, sports franchise owner

Malcolm Irving Glazer was an American businessman and sports team owner. He was the president and chief executive officer of First Allied Corporation, a holding company for his varied business interests, and owned both Manchester United of the Premier League and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League.

Al Lopez Field demolished home venue of the defunct Tampa Tarpons

Al López Field was a spring training and Minor League baseball park in West Tampa, Tampa, Florida, United States. It was named for Al López, who was the first Tampa native to play Major League Baseball (MLB), manage an MLB team, and be enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Al López Field was built in 1954 and hosted its first spring training in 1955, when the Chicago White Sox moved their training site to Tampa from California. Al López became the White Sox's manager in 1957, and for the next three springs, he was the home manager in a ballpark named after himself. The Cincinnati Reds replaced the White Sox as Al López Field's primary tenant in 1960 and would return every spring for almost 30 years. The Tampa Tarpons, the Reds' Class-A minor league affiliate in the Florida State League, played at the ballpark every summer from 1961-1987.

It was known as Tampa Community Stadium during construction, but the naming rights were bought for US$32.5 million for a 13–year deal by St. Petersburg-based Raymond James Financial in June 1998. [8] On April 27, 2006, an extension was signed to maintain naming rights through 2015. In May 2016 the Buccaneers announced that the naming rights were extended an additional 12 years ensuring that Raymond James Financial's name will continue to appear through 2028. [9]

Naming rights financial transaction and form of advertising whereby a corporation or other entity purchases the right to name a facility or event, typically for a defined period of time

Naming rights are a financial transaction and form of advertising whereby a corporation or other entity purchases the right to name a facility or event, typically for a defined period of time. For properties like a multi-purpose arena, performing arts venue or an athletic field, the term ranges from three to 20 years. Longer terms are more common for higher profile venues such as a professional sports facility.

St. Petersburg, Florida City in Florida, United States

St. Petersburg is a city in Pinellas County, Florida, United States. As of the 2015 census estimate, the population was 257,083, making it the fifth-most populous city in Florida and the largest in the state that is not a county seat.

Raymond James Financial is an American multinational independent investment bank and financial services company providing financial services to individuals, corporations and municipalities through its subsidiary companies that engage primarily in investment and financial planning, in addition to investment banking and asset management.

The stadium officially opened on September 20, 1998 [10] , when the Tampa Bay Buccaneers defeated the Chicago Bears, 27–15. The stadium hosted its first soccer game on March 20, 1999, when the Tampa Bay Mutiny lost to D.C. United, 5–2.

Chicago Bears National Football League franchise in Chicago, Illinois

The Chicago Bears are a professional American football team based in Chicago, Illinois. The Bears compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The Bears have won nine NFL Championships, including one Super Bowl, and hold the NFL record for the most enshrinees in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the most retired jersey numbers. The Bears have also recorded more victories than any other NFL franchise.

Tampa Bay Mutiny association football club

The Tampa Bay Mutiny was a professional soccer team based in Tampa, Florida. They were a charter member of Major League Soccer (MLS) and played from 1996 to 2001. They played their home games at Tampa Stadium and then at Raymond James Stadium.

D.C. United American soccer team

D.C. United is an American professional soccer club based in Washington, D.C. The club competes as a member of the Eastern Conference in Major League Soccer (MLS), the top level of professional American soccer. The franchise began play in 1996 as one of the ten charter clubs of the league. The club was one of the most successful clubs in the early years of MLS, winning eight of its thirteen titles between 1996 and 1998 under then head coach Bruce Arena. United holds the joint MLS record for most Supporters' Shields, has four MLS Cups, and been crowned U.S. Open Cup champions three times. It is also the first club to win both the MLS Supporters' Shield and MLS Cup consecutively.

The stadium also hosts the annual Outback Bowl college football post-season game on New Year's Day since 1999. The Gasparilla Bowl will be held at the venue starting with the 2018 edition.

Outback Bowl American college football tournament

The Outback Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida, usually on New Years Day. The event was originally called the Hall of Fame Bowl from 1986 to 1994 until being renamed in 1995 for its new title sponsor, Outback Steakhouse. It is organized by the Tampa Bay Bowl Association under Jim McVay, who has been the president and CEO since 1988.

New Years Day Holiday

New Year's Day, also simply called New Year or New Year's, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

Gasparilla Bowl An NCAA-sanctioned post-season college football bowl game.

The Gasparilla Bowl is an annual NCAA-sanctioned post-season college football bowl game played in the Tampa Bay Area. It was first played in 2008 as the St. Petersburg Bowl at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. The game was renamed the Gasparilla Bowl in 2017 as a nod to the legend of José Gaspar, a mythical pirate who supposedly operated in the Tampa Bay area and who is the inspiration for Tampa's Gasparilla Pirate Festival. In May 2018, the owners announced the bowl would be relocated to Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.

The stadium was selected to host the ACC Championship Game in 2008 and 2009.

The stadium is home field for the University of South Florida Bulls of the American Athletic Conference. The team's record crowd at Raymond James Stadium is 69,383, on September 29, 2012, when the Bulls during their worst season ever played a non-conference game against the popular Florida State University Seminoles from the powerhouse Atlantic Coast Conference for the first time.

The largest crowd ever recorded in Raymond James Stadium came on January 9, 2017 as the stadium hosted the 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship. 74,512 people were in attendance.

Through to the 2009 season, every Buccaneers game at Raymond James Stadium sold out. In 2010, no home game achieved a ticket sell out, so none could be broadcast on local television. The streak carried over until week four of the 2011 season, when it sold enough tickets for its Monday night game with the Indianapolis Colts on October 3 to avoid a local blackout.

The Monster Jam tour for monster trucks holds an event at the stadium.

Features

The pirate ship at Raymond James Stadium Pirate ship.jpg
The pirate ship at Raymond James Stadium

One of the most recognizable features of the stadium is a 103-foot (31 m), 43-ton steel-and-concrete replica pirate ship in the north end zone. Each time the Bucs score points, enter the other team's red zone, or win a home game, the replica cannons on the ship are fired off. The cannons fire once for each point scored. In addition, when the Buccaneers enter their opponent's red zone, stadium hosts hoist team flags around the perimeter of the upper deck. During various times throughout the game, the song "Yo Ho (A Pirate's Life for Me)" is played on the stadium public address system (taken from Pirates of the Caribbean), which signals patrons on board the ship to throw beads, t–shirts, and other free prizes to the people below. The segment is also known as a "Mini Gasparilla" to most fans. An animated parrot sits on the stern of the pirate ship. Controlled by radio and remote control, the parrot picks fans out of the crowd and talks to those passing by. [11]

During Super Bowl XXXV on CBS, the pregame, halftime, and post-game desk reporting took place from aboard the pirate ship. NBC's Super Bowl XLIII and ESPN's 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship coverage also emanated from the ship.

The two "Buc Vision" 2,200-square-foot (200 m2) Daktronics video displays were among the largest in the league when they were built. In 2016 they were replaced with 9,600-square foot, high-definition video boards in both end zones. 'Buccaneer Cove' features a weathered, two–story fishing village facade, housing stadium concessions and restrooms. All areas of the stadium are ADA compliant.

Temporary bleachers were erected in the end zones for Super Bowl XXXV, which set a then-record stadium attendance of 71,921. The stadium attendance record has since been surpassed by the 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship, which also made use of temporary seating. [12]

In 2003, the corner billboards in the stadium were replaced with rotating trilon billboards and these were replaced in 2016 with new high visibility displays.

Raymond James Stadium boasts the second-best turf in the NFL, according to a 2009 biannual players' survey. [13]

In early 2016, the stadium was given an extensive facelift. The most notable improvement was the replacement of the 2,200-square-foot (200 m2) video displays with state of the art, high visibility 9,600-square-foot (890 m2) video displays in both the north and south end zones along with the addition of a new 2,300-square-foot (210 m2) video tower in each corner. All together, the video displays cover more than 28,000-square-foot (2,600 m2), making Raymond James Stadium the third-largest video displays in the NFL. The original sound system and the stadium's luxury boxes were also upgraded. [14] A second round of improvements are planned for after the 2016 season is complete.

Nicknames

The stadium is referred to as "Ray Jay" or "The New Sombrero", a spinoff from "The Big Sombrero", the nickname of Tampa Stadium. Somewhat derisively, it has been occasionally referred to as "the CITS", a name coined by long-time local sportscaster Chris Thomas which stands for "Community Investment Tax Stadium", referring to the fact that the stadium was entirely financed by local taxpayers. [15]

Timeline

Buccaneer game action at Raymond James Stadium Raymondjames2005.JPG
Buccaneer game action at Raymond James Stadium
RJSPAN.jpg
Panoramic view from The Pirate Ship during the 2009 off-season

Notable football games

Super Bowl

SeasonGameDateWinning teamScoreLosing teamScoreAttendance
2000 Super Bowl XXXV January 28, 2001 Baltimore Ravens 34 New York Giants 771,921
2008 Super Bowl XLIII February 1, 2009 Pittsburgh Steelers 27 Arizona Cardinals 2370,774
2020 Super Bowl LV February 1, 2021 TBD0TBD0TBD

NFL Playoffs

SeasonGameDateVisiting teamScoreHome teamScoreAttendance
1999 NFC Divisional January 15, 2000 Washington Redskins 13 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 1465,835
2002 NFC Divisional January 12, 2003 San Francisco 49ers 6 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 3165,599
2005 NFC Wild Card January 7, 2006 Washington Redskins 17 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 1065,514
2007 NFC Wild Card January 6, 2008 New York Giants 24 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 1465,621

College Football Games

SeasonGameDateWinning teamScoreLosing teamScoreAttendance
2016 College Football Playoff National Championship January 9, 2017 Clemson Tigers 35 Alabama Crimson Tide 3174,512

Soccer

The stadium was also home to the former Tampa Bay Mutiny of Major League Soccer and continues to periodically host other soccer matches due to its accommodating field dimensions. For example, on June 8, 2012, it hosted the United States men's national soccer team's opening qualifying match against Antigua and Barbuda for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, which the United States won 3-1. [29]

In October 11, 2018, the Colombia men's national soccer team played against the United States men's national soccer team (4-2) to set the current attendance record of 38,361 for a soccer match at this stadium.[ citation needed ]

International Soccer Matches

DateWinning TeamResultLosing TeamTournamentSpectators
June 8, 2012Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3-1Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda 2014 FIFA World Cup qualification23,971
October 11, 2018Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 4-2Flag of the United States.svg  United States Friendly38,631

Other uses

Concerts

Raymond James Stadium has hosted several large scale concerts, with the largest attendance (72,000) coming at a show by U2 in 2009. [30] Other performers at the venue have included Kenny Chesney, Taylor Swift, Beyoncé, NSYNC, and One Direction.

WWE WrestleMania 36

Raymond James Stadium is scheduled to host WWE's flagship pay-per-view WrestleMania 36 on April 5, 2020.


See also

Related Research Articles

Super Bowl XXXVII

Super Bowl XXXVII was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Oakland Raiders and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Tampa Bay Buccaneers to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2002 season. The Buccaneers defeated the Raiders by the score of 48–21, tied with Super Bowl XXXV for the seventh largest Super Bowl margin of victory, and winning their first ever Super Bowl. The game, played on January 26, 2003 at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, California, was the sixth Super Bowl to be held a week after the conference championship games. It was also the last Super Bowl played in January.

Joel Glazer is part of the Glazer family, who control First Allied Corporation and the Zapata Corporation, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the NFL, and England's Manchester United Football Club. The family is based in Florida.

George M. Steinbrenner Field baseball park located in Tampa, Florida

George M. Steinbrenner Field, is a baseball stadium located in Tampa, Florida across Dale Mabry Highway from Raymond James Stadium, home of the National Football League's Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The ballpark was built in 1996 and holds 11,026 people with an addition in right field built in 2007. This ballpark is the largest spring training ballpark in Florida.

Rich McKay American football executive

Rich McKay is the president, CEO, and former general manager of the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League. He was the general manager of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers when they won Super Bowl XXXVII.

This article details the history of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers American football franchise.

The 1998 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 23rd season in the National Football League and their first season in Raymond James Stadium.

The 1977 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season continued the losing streak that encompassed the entire 1976 season, and extended it to 26 games, which as of 2017 remains a record in the National Football League. Fear of becoming the Buccaneers’ first victim provided motivation to opposing teams. It took nearly two seasons for the Buccaneers to achieve their first franchise victory, a 33–14 win over the New Orleans Saints in the second-to-last game of the year. The next week, the Bucs earned their first home victory, over the St. Louis Cardinals.

The 1995 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 20th season in the National Football League.

The 1985 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 10th season in the National Football League

The 1987 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was a year of great change for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ organization in the National Football League. The season began with the hiring of former New York Giants and University of Alabama head coach Ray Perkins. Perkins had only needed three seasons to build the Giants into a playoff team, and it was hoped that he would be able to repeat the feat with the Buccaneers.

The Tampa Bay Area is home to many sports teams and has a substantial history of sporting activity. Most of the region's professional sports franchises use the name "Tampa Bay", which is the name of a body of water, not of any city. This is to emphasize that they represent the wider metropolitan area and not a particular municipality.

Sports in Florida

The U.S. state of Florida has three NFL teams, two MLB teams, two NBA teams, two NHL teams, and one MLS team.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers Cheerleaders

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers Cheerleaders are the official cheerleading squad of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League. The squad performs a variety of dance routines at Raymond James Stadium, the home of the Bucs, with the team's mascot Captain Fear. The squad debuted alongside the Buccaneers during their inaugural season. The squad was originally known as the SwashBucklers until 1998.

The Buccaneers–Dolphins rivalry is between the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Miami Dolphins of the National Football League. It is an in-state, interconference matchup between the two oldest NFL teams in the state of Florida. It has been active in most years since the Buccaneers joined the league as an expansion team in 1976. The rivalry is mostly a mainstay of the preseason, as the teams have been in different conferences since 1977 and as such only play each other during the regular season once every four years.

Buccaneers–Panthers rivalry

The Buccaneers–Panthers rivalry is between the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Carolina Panthers.

The 2014 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 39th season in the National Football League. It was also the first season under head coach Lovie Smith, replacing Greg Schiano, who was fired at the end of the 2013 season. It was also the first season under general manager Jason Licht, following the departure of Mark Dominik, after a disappointing 2013 season.

The 2017 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 42nd season in the National Football League, the 20th playing their home games at Raymond James Stadium and the second under head coach Dirk Koetter.

References

  1. "Patriots Sign Byars". The Ledger . October 16, 1996. Retrieved October 22, 2011.
  2. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Community Development Project. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  3. "Sports Facilities - FSC-Inc" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on September 4, 2012.
  4. "Raymond James Stadium". Ballparks.com.
  5. "U2 Fans Line Up Before Dawn at Ray Jay Stadium". St. Petersburg Times . Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved November 7, 2010.
  6. "Raymond James". www.raymondjames.com.
  7. 1 2 Testerman, Jeff (January 25, 2001). "Super Bowl 2001: We Paid for It; It Paid Off". St. Petersburg Times . Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  8. "Bucs' New Stadium Gets A Name, New name is 'The Raymond James Stadium'". CBS News. December 13, 1999. Retrieved February 14, 2009.
  9. "Raymond James Stadium Naming Rights Through 2028". buccaneers.com. August 28, 2016.
  10. http://raymondjamesstadium.com/stadium-history/
  11. "Raymond James Stadium | Stadium Facts". Raymondjames.com. Retrieved February 14, 2009.
  12. "College Football National Championship Seating Chart 2017" . Retrieved March 28, 2017.
  13. "Top Turf in the NFL? Cards Best, Steelers Worst". ESPN.com. January 29, 2009. Retrieved February 18, 2012.
  14. "Raymond James Stadium gets $140M Makeover". ESPN.com. August 28, 2016.
  15. Deggans, Eric (February 20, 2004). "Chris Thomas Touched Us All". St. Petersburg Times . Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  16. "Bucs Stay in Tampa With a Big Price Tag". Milwaukee Journal . January 17, 1995. Archived from the original on December 27, 2008. Retrieved February 14, 2009.
  17. Williams, Chareen (December 7, 1995). "Tampa Still Hopeful Bucs Will Stay Put". Orlando Sentinel . Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  18. Harry, Chris (July 24, 2005). "Fantastic Voyage". Orlando Sentinel . Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  19. Henderson, Joe (September 28, 1995). "Chipping In: Malcolm Glazer Says He'll Pay "About Half" the Cost of a New Stadium As a Seat-Deposit Plan Is Unveiled". The Tampa Tribune . Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  20. Washington, Wayne (September 18, 1998). "Stadium Rose Despite Challenges". St. Petersburg Times . Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  21. "In Pictures: The Most Valuable NFL Teams". Forbes.com. September 12, 2007. Archived from the original on October 11, 2008. Retrieved February 14, 2009.
  22. Testerman, Jeff (January 24, 2003). "Stadium Tax Helped Pay for Bucs' Success". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  23. Canning, Michael (September 29, 2001). "Former Mayor's Opinion of Stadium Hasn't Changed". St. Petersburg Times . Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  24. Varian, Bill (April 18, 2003). "Tampabay: Tax Bill Swells as Bucs Stall". St. Petersburg Times . Retrieved February 14, 2009.
  25. Varian, Bill (March 6, 2003). "Hillsborough: Hillsborough Votes Yes on Plan to Own Stadium". St. Petersburg Times . Retrieved February 14, 2009.
  26. Varian, Bill (December 18, 2003). "Hillsborough: County Act Ends Tax on Stadium". St. Petersburg Times . Retrieved February 14, 2009.
  27. Contorno, Steve (October 1, 2015). "How the Raymond James Stadium negotiations between the Buccaneers and the Tampa Sports Authority broke down". Tampa Tribune / tbo.com. Archived from the original on September 15, 2016. Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  28. Pransky, Noah (December 3, 2015). "Bucs strike deal with county on stadium renovations". USA Today / WTSP. Retrieved August 28, 2016.
  29. Godfrey, John (June 9, 2012). "A World Cup Qualifying Victory Lacks Quality for the U.S". The New York Times.
  30. O'Reilly, Sean (January 9, 2017). "U2 to play Tampa's Raymond James Stadium on June 14th on 'The Joshua Tree 2017' summer tour".
Events and tenants
Preceded by
Tampa Stadium/Houlihan's Stadium
Home of the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers

1998 – present
Succeeded by
current
Preceded by
University of Phoenix Stadium
Home of the
College Football Playoff National Championship

2017
Succeeded by
Mercedes-Benz Stadium
Preceded by
Jacksonville Municipal Stadium
Host of the
ACC Championship Game

2008–2009
Succeeded by
Bank of America Stadium
Preceded by
Tampa Stadium/Houlihan's Stadium
Home of the
Tampa Bay Mutiny

1999 – 2001
Succeeded by
last stadium
Preceded by
Georgia Dome
University of Phoenix Stadium
Hard Rock Stadium
Host of the Super Bowl
XXXV 2001
XLIII 2009
LV 2021
Succeeded by
Louisiana Superdome
Sun Life Stadium
Los Angeles Stadium at Hollywood Park
Preceded by
MetLife Stadium
Host of WrestleMania
36 (2020)
Succeeded by
TBD