NFC North

Last updated

NFC North
Conference National Football Conference
League National Football League
Sport American football
Founded1967 (As NFL Western Conference Central Division)
No. of teams4
Country United States
Most recent
champion(s)
Detroit Lions
(4th title)
Most titles Minnesota Vikings
(21 titles)
Invisible Square.svg
NFC North
NFC North Teams Location

The National Football Conference – Northern Division or NFC North is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). Nicknamed the "Black and Blue Division" for the rough and tough rivalry games between the teams, it currently has four members: the Chicago Bears, Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, and Minnesota Vikings, with the latter three based within most definitions of the Upper Midwest. The NFC North was previously known as the NFC Central from 1970 to 2001. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were previously members, from 1977, one year after they joined the league as an expansion team, until 2002 when they moved to the NFC South. The division was created in 1967 as the Central Division of the NFL's Western Conference and existed for three seasons before the AFL–NFL merger. After the merger, it was renamed the NFC Central and retained that name until the NFL split into eight divisions in 2002. The four current division teams have been together in the same division or conference since the Vikings joined the league in 1961. The Bears, Lions (known as the Portsmouth Spartans until 1934) and Packers have been in the same division or conference since the NFL began a conference format in 1933. Largely because the four teams have played each other at least twice a year, with the exception of the strike-shortened 1982 season, for more than 60 years (more than 80 years in the case of the Bears, Lions and Packers), the entire division is considered one very large rivalry.

Contents

The division has a total of five Super Bowl wins. The Packers have won four and the Bears one, with the most recent happening at the conclusion of the 2010 season. Of the ten NFL teams with the highest winning percentage throughout their respective franchise histories, three of them are in the NFC North (the Packers, the Bears, and the Vikings). Conversely, the Lions have one of the lowest winning percentages in the NFL, including the first winless 16-game season in NFL history, in 2008. [1]

The Packers hold an overall regular season record of 790–590–38 (through the end of the 2022 season) with an overall playoff record of 36–25, four Super Bowl titles in five Super Bowl appearances, and nine pre-Super Bowl league titles. The Bears hold an overall regular season record of 786–624–42 with an overall playoff record of 17–20, one Super Bowl title in two Super Bowl appearances, and eight pre-Super Bowl league titles. The Vikings hold an overall regular season record of 516–425–11 with an overall playoff record of 21–31, no Super Bowl titles in four Super Bowl appearances, and one league title. The Lions hold an overall regular season record of 579–702–34 with an overall playoff record of 7–13, and four pre-Super Bowl league titles. They have yet to appear in a Super Bowl.

In recent years, the division has been less successful in the playoffs compared to others, holding the second-longest active Super Bowl drought (only ahead of the AFC South) and a 1–9 record in conference championships since 2007, with the only win being the Packers over the Bears in 2010. They have clinched two Super Bowl berths in the 21st century, compared to the other NFC divisions which each have six or more.

The division earned the moniker "Black and Blue Division" due to its intense rivalries and physical style of play, and this nickname is still used regularly today. It is also known as the "Frostbite Division" as all teams played home games in late season winter cold until the mid-1970s. The division is also humorously called the "Frozen North", although Detroit has played its home games indoors since 1975, and Minnesota also did so from 1982 to 2013 and returned to indoor home games at U.S. Bank Stadium in 2016.

ESPN sportscaster Chris Berman often refers to this division as the "NFC Norris" because of its grittiness and its geographical similarity to the National Hockey League's former Norris Division, although in a twist of irony the NHL dropped the Norris name in favor of Central almost a decade before the NFL dropped the Central name in favor of North.

Division lineups

Place cursor over year for division champ or Super Bowl team.

Years
NFL Western Conference
Central Division
NFC Central Division [B]
1900s2000s
67 [A] 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01
Chicago Bears
Detroit Lions
Green Bay Packers
Minnesota Vikings
  Tampa Bay Buccaneers [C]
NFC North Division [D]
2000s
02 [D] 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 242526
Chicago Bears
Detroit Lions
Green Bay Packers
Minnesota Vikings
 Team not in division   Division Won Super Bowl   Division Won NFC Championship   Division won NFL Championship, Lost Super Bowl
A The NFL Western Conference was divided into the Coastal and Central divisions. The Packers had won Super Bowl I in 1966 in the NFL Western Conference.
B Starting in the 1970 season, the division became the National Football Conference - Central Division (or NFC Central for short), after the AFL–NFL merger.
C Tampa Bay moved from the AFC West in 1977
D For the 2002 season, the league realigned to have 8 four team divisions. Division adopts current name. Tampa Bay moves to the NFC South.

Division champions

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
NFL Central (pre-merger)
1967 Green Bay Packers (1) 9–4–1Won Conference playoffs (Rams) 28–7
Won NFL Championship (Cowboys) 21–17
Won Super Bowl II (vs. Raiders) 33–14
1968 Minnesota Vikings (1) 8–6Lost Conference playoffs (at Colts) 14–24
1969 Minnesota Vikings (2) 12–2Won Conference playoffs (Rams) 23–20
Won NFL Championship (Browns) 27–7
Lost Super Bowl IV (vs. Chiefs) 7–23
NFC Central (post merger)
1970 Minnesota Vikings (3) 12–2Lost Divisional playoffs (49ers) 14–17
1971 Minnesota Vikings (4) 11–3Lost Divisional playoffs (Cowboys) 12–20
1972 Green Bay Packers (2) 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (at Redskins) 3–16
1973 Minnesota Vikings (5) 12–2Won Divisional playoffs (Redskins) 27–20
Won NFC Championship (at Cowboys) 27–10
Lost Super Bowl VIII (vs. Dolphins) 7–24
1974 Minnesota Vikings (6) 10–4Won Divisional playoffs (Cardinals) 30–14
Won NFC Championship (Rams) 14–10
Lost Super Bowl IX (vs. Steelers) 6–16
1975 Minnesota Vikings (7) 12–2Lost Divisional playoffs (Cowboys) 14–17
1976 Minnesota Vikings (8) 11–2–1Won Divisional playoffs (Redskins) 35–20
Won NFC Championship (Rams) 24–13
Lost Super Bowl XI (vs. Raiders) 14–32
1977 Minnesota Vikings (9) 9–5Won Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 14–7
Lost NFC Championship (at Cowboys) 6–23
1978 Minnesota Vikings (10) 8–7–1Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 10–34
1979 Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1) 10–6Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 24–17
Lost NFC Championship (Rams) 0–9
1980 Minnesota Vikings (11) 9–7Lost Divisional playoffs (at Eagles) 16–31
1981 Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2) 9–7Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 0–38
1982+ Green Bay Packers+ 5–3–1Won First Round playoffs (Cardinals) 41–16
Lost Second Round playoffs (at Cowboys) 26–37
1983 Detroit Lions (1) 9–7Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 23–24
1984 Chicago Bears (1) 10–6Won Divisional playoffs (at Redskins) 23–19
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 0–23
1985 Chicago Bears (2) 15–1Won Divisional playoffs (Giants) 21–0
Won NFC Championship (Rams) 24–0
Won Super Bowl XX (vs. Patriots) 46–10
1986 Chicago Bears (3) 14–2Lost Divisional playoffs (Redskins) 13–27
1987 Chicago Bears (4) 11–4Lost Divisional playoffs (Redskins) 17–21
1988 Chicago Bears (5) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 20–12
Lost NFC Championship (49ers) 3–28
1989 Minnesota Vikings (12) 10–6Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 13–41
1990 Chicago Bears (6) 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Saints) 16–6
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Giants) 3–31
1991 Detroit Lions (2) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Cowboys) 38–6
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 10–41
1992 Minnesota Vikings (13) 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (Redskins) 7–24
1993 Detroit Lions (3) 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Packers) 24–28
1994 Minnesota Vikings (14) 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Bears) 18–35
1995 Green Bay Packers (3) 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Falcons) 37–20
Won Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 27–17
Lost NFC Championship (at Cowboys) 47–38
1996 Green Bay Packers (4) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (49ers) 35–14
Won NFC Championship (Panthers) 30–13
Won Super Bowl XXXI (vs. Patriots) 35–21
1997 Green Bay Packers (5) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Buccaneers) 21–7
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 23–10
Lost Super Bowl XXXII (vs. Broncos) 24–31
1998 Minnesota Vikings (15) 15–1Won Divisional playoffs (Cardinals) 41–21
Lost NFC Championship (Falcons) 27–30 (OT)
1999 Tampa Bay Buccaneers (3) 11–5Won Divisional playoffs (Redskins) 14–13
Lost NFC Championship (at Rams) 6–11
2000 Minnesota Vikings (16) 11–5Won Divisional playoffs (Saints) 34–16
Lost NFC Championship (at Giants) 0–41
2001 Chicago Bears (7) 13–3Lost Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 19–33
NFC North
2002 Green Bay Packers (6) 12–4Lost Wild Card playoffs (Falcons) 7–27
2003 Green Bay Packers (7) 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Seahawks) 33–27 (OT)
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Eagles) 17–20 (OT)
2004 Green Bay Packers (8) 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 17–31
2005 Chicago Bears (8) 11–5Lost Divisional playoffs (Panthers) 21–29
2006 Chicago Bears (9) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Seahawks) 27–24 (OT)
Won NFC Championship (Saints) 39–14
Lost Super Bowl XLI (vs. Colts) 17–29
2007 Green Bay Packers (9) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Seahawks) 42–20
Lost NFC Championship (Giants) 20–23 (OT)
2008 Minnesota Vikings (17) 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Eagles) 14–26
2009 Minnesota Vikings (18) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Cowboys) 34–3
Lost NFC Championship (at Saints) 28–31 (OT)
2010 Chicago Bears (10) 11–5Won Divisional playoffs (Seahawks) 35–24
Lost NFC Championship (Packers) 14–21
2011 Green Bay Packers (10) 15–1Lost Divisional playoffs (Giants) 20–37
2012 Green Bay Packers (11) 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 24–10
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 31–45
2013 Green Bay Packers (12) 8–7–1Lost Wild Card playoffs (49ers) 20–23
2014 Green Bay Packers (13) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Cowboys) 26–21
Lost NFC Championship (at Seahawks) 22–28 (OT)
2015 Minnesota Vikings (19) 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (Seahawks) 9–10
2016 Green Bay Packers (14) 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Giants) 38–13
Won Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 34–31
Lost NFC Championship (at Falcons) 21–44
2017 Minnesota Vikings (20) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Saints) 29–24
Lost NFC Championship (at Eagles) 7–38
2018 Chicago Bears (11) 12–4Lost Wild Card playoffs (Eagles) 15–16
2019 Green Bay Packers (15) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Seahawks) 28–23
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 20–37
2020 Green Bay Packers (16) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Rams) 32–18
Lost NFC Championship (Buccaneers) 26–31
2021 Green Bay Packers (17) 13–4Lost Divisional playoffs (49ers) 10–13
2022 Minnesota Vikings (21) 13–4Lost Wild Card playoffs (Giants) 24–31
2023 Detroit Lions (4) 12–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 24–23
Won Divisional playoffs (Buccaneers) 31–23
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 31–34

+ A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games, so the league used a special 16-team playoff tournament just for this year. Division standings were ignored; Green Bay had the best record of the division teams.

Wild Card qualifiers

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
NFC Central
1970 Detroit Lions 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 0–5
1977 Chicago Bears 9–5Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 7–37
1979 Chicago Bears 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 17–27
1982+ Minnesota Vikings 5–4Won First Round playoffs (Falcons) 30–24
Lost Second Round playoffs (at Redskins) 7–21
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 5–4Lost First Round playoffs (at Cowboys) 17–30
Detroit Lions 4–5Lost First Round Playoffs (at Redskins) 7–31
1987 Minnesota Vikings 8–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Saints) 44–10
Won Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 36–24
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 10–17
1988 Minnesota Vikings 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 28–17
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 9–34
1991 Chicago Bears 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (Cowboys) 13–17
1993 Minnesota Vikings 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Giants) 10–17
Green Bay Packers 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Lions) 28–24
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 17–27
1994 Green Bay Packers 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (Lions) 16–12
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 9–35
Detroit Lions 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Packers) 12–16
Chicago Bears 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 35–18
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 15–44
1995 Detroit Lions 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 37–58
1996 Minnesota Vikings 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Cowboys) 15–40
1997 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Lions) 20–10
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 7–21
Detroit Lions 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Buccaneers) 10–20
Minnesota Vikings 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Giants) 23–22
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 22–38
1998 Green Bay Packers 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (at 49ers) 27–30
1999 Minnesota Vikings 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Cowboys) 27–10
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 37–49
Detroit Lions 8–8Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Redskins) 13–27
2000 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 3–21
2001 Green Bay Packers 12–4Won Wild Card playoffs (49ers) 25–15
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 17–45
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 9–31
NFC North
2004 Minnesota Vikings 8–8Won Wild Card playoffs (at Packers) 31–17
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Eagles) 14–27
2009 Green Bay Packers 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Cardinals) 45–51 (OT)
2010 Green Bay Packers 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 21–16
Won Divisional playoffs (at Falcons) 48–21
Won NFC Championship (at Bears) 21–14
Won Super Bowl XLV (vs. Steelers) 31–25
2011 Detroit Lions 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Saints) 28–45
2012 Minnesota Vikings 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Packers) 10–24
2014 Detroit Lions 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Cowboys) 20–24
2015 Green Bay Packers 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Redskins) 35–18
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cardinals) 26–20 (OT)
2016 Detroit Lions 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Seahawks) 6–26
2019 Minnesota Vikings 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Saints) 26–20 (OT)
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 10–27
2020 Chicago Bears 8–8Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Saints) 9–21
2023 Green Bay Packers 9–8Won Wild Card playoffs (at Cowboys) 48–32
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 21–24

+ A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games, so the league used a special 16-team playoff tournament just for this year.

Total playoff berths

Total playoff berths as members of the NFC Central/North

(1967–2023 seasons)

TeamDivision
Championships
Playoff
Berths
NFL League
Titles
Super Bowl
Appearances
Super Bowl
Wins
Minnesota Vikings 2131140
Green Bay Packers 17261354
Chicago Bears 1116921
Detroit Lions 413400
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 37000

To sort table above, click button to right of heading.

(1)Does not include Green Bay's 1966 season Super Bowl I win

(2)Does not include Tampa Bay's 1976 season (AFC West) and 2002+ seasons (NFC South)

Total playoff berths in team history

(1920–2023 seasons)

TeamDivision
Championships
Playoff
Berths
NFL League
Titles
(pre-merger)
Conference
Wins
Super Bowl
Wins
Total (1)
Championships
Chicago Bears 19288419
Green Bay Packers 2136119413
Minnesota Vikings 22321400
Detroit Lions 4194404

To sort table above, click button to right of heading.

1 From 1966 to 1969, this means winning both the NFL Championship game AND the Super Bowl. Hence, the Vikings' NFL Championship victory in 1969 isn't counted. The Packers had 2 NFL titles during this time frame and also won Super Bowl I and II.

Season results

(#)Denotes team that won the Super Bowl
(#)Denotes team that won the NFC Championship
(#)Denotes team that won the NFL Championship
(#)Denotes team that qualified for the NFL Playoffs
SeasonTeam (record)
1st2nd3rd4th5th
NFL Central (pre-merger)
1967 Green Bay (9–4–1) Chicago (7–6–1) Detroit (5–7–2) Minnesota (3–8–3)
1968 Minnesota (8–6) Chicago (7–7) Green Bay (6–7–1) Detroit (4–8–2)
1969 Minnesota (12–2) Detroit (9–4–1) Green Bay (8–6) Chicago (1–13)
NFC Central (post merger)
1970 Minnesota (12–2) Detroit (10–4) Green Bay (6–8) Chicago (6–8)
1971 Minnesota (11–3) Detroit (7–6–1) Chicago (6–8) Green Bay (4–8–2)
1972 Green Bay (10–4) Detroit (8–5–1) Minnesota (7–7) Chicago (4–9–1)
1973 Minnesota (12–2) Detroit (6–7–1) Green Bay (5–7–2) Chicago (3–11)
1974 Minnesota (10–4) Detroit (7–7) Green Bay (6–8) Chicago (4–10)
1975 (1) Minnesota (12–2) Detroit (7–7) Chicago (4–10) Green Bay (4–10)
1976 (1) Minnesota (11–2–1) Chicago (7–7) Detroit (6–8) Green Bay (5–9)
1977 (3) Minnesota (9–5)(4) Chicago (9–5) Detroit (6–8) Green Bay (4–10) Tampa Bay (2–12)
1978 (3) Minnesota (8–7–1) Green Bay (8–7–1) Detroit (7–9) Chicago (7–9) Tampa Bay (5–11)
1979 (2) Tampa Bay (10–6)(5) Chicago (10–6) Minnesota (7–9) Green Bay (5–11) Detroit (2–14)
1980 (3) Minnesota (9–7) Detroit (9–7) Chicago (7–9) Tampa Bay (5–10–1) Green Bay (5–10–1)
1981 (3) Tampa Bay (9–7) Detroit (8–8) Green Bay (8–8) Minnesota (7–9) Chicago (6–10)
1982^(3) Green Bay (5–3–1)(4) Minnesota (5–4)(7) Tampa Bay (5–4)(8) Detroit (4–5) Chicago (3–6)
1983 (3) Detroit (9–7) Green Bay (8–8) Chicago (8–8) Minnesota (8–8) Tampa Bay (2–14)
1984 (3) Chicago (10–6) Green Bay (8–8) Tampa Bay (6–10) Detroit (4–11–1) Minnesota (3–13)
1985 (1) Chicago (15–1) Green Bay (8–8) Minnesota (7–9) Detroit (7–9) Tampa Bay (2–14)
1986 (2) Chicago (14–2) Minnesota (9–7) Detroit (5–11) Green Bay (4–12) Tampa Bay (2–14)
1987 (2) Chicago (11–4)(5) Minnesota (8–7) Green Bay (5–9–1) Tampa Bay (4–11) Detroit (4–11)
1988 (1) Chicago (12–4)(4) Minnesota (11–5) Tampa Bay (5–11) Detroit (4–12) Green Bay (4–12)
1989 (3) Minnesota (10–6) Green Bay (10–6) Detroit (7–9) Chicago (6–10) Tampa Bay (5–11)
1990 (3) Chicago (11–5) Tampa Bay (6–10) Detroit (6–10) Green Bay (6–10) Minnesota (6–10)
1991 (2) Detroit (12–4)(4) Chicago (11–5) Minnesota (8–8) Green Bay (4–12) Tampa Bay (3–13)
1992 (3) Minnesota (11–5) Green Bay (9–7) Tampa Bay (5–11) Chicago (5–11) Detroit (5–11)
1993 (3) Detroit (10–6)(5) Minnesota (9–7)(6) Green Bay (9–7) Chicago (7–9) Tampa Bay (5–11)
1994 (3) Minnesota (10–6)(4) Green Bay (9–7)(5) Detroit (9–7)(6) Chicago (9–7) Tampa Bay (6–10)
1995 (3) Green Bay (11–5)(5) Detroit (10–6) Chicago (9–7) Minnesota (8–8) Tampa Bay (7–9)
1996 (1) Green Bay (13–3)(6) Minnesota (9–7) Chicago (7–9) Tampa Bay (6–10) Detroit (5–11)
1997 (2) Green Bay (13–3)(4) Tampa Bay (10–6)(5) Detroit (9–7)(6) Minnesota (9–7) Chicago (4–12)
1998 (1) Minnesota (15–1)(5) Green Bay (11–5) Tampa Bay (8–8) Detroit (5–11) Chicago (4–12)
1999 (2) Tampa Bay (11–5)(4) Minnesota (10–6)(6) Detroit (8–8) Green Bay (8–8) Chicago (6–10)
2000 (2) Minnesota (11–5)(5) Tampa Bay (10–6) Green Bay (9–7) Detroit (9–7) Chicago (5–11)
2001 (2) Chicago (13–3)(4) Green Bay (12–4)(6) Tampa Bay (9–7) Minnesota (5–11) Detroit (2–14)
SeasonTeam (record)
1st2nd3rd4th
NFC North
2002 (3) Green Bay (12–4) Minnesota (6–10) Chicago (4–12) Detroit (3–13)
2003 (4) Green Bay (10–6) Minnesota (9–7) Chicago (7–9) Detroit (5–11)
2004 (3) Green Bay (10–6)(6) Minnesota (8–8) Detroit (6–10) Chicago (5–11)
2005 (2) Chicago (11–5) Minnesota (9–7) Detroit (5–11) Green Bay (4–12)
2006 (1) Chicago (13–3) Green Bay (8–8) Minnesota (6–10) Detroit (3–13)
2007 (2) Green Bay (13–3) Minnesota (8–8) Detroit (7–9) Chicago (7–9)
2008 (3) Minnesota (10–6) Chicago (9–7) Green Bay (6–10) Detroit (0–16)
2009 (2) Minnesota (12–4)(5) Green Bay (11–5) Chicago (7–9) Detroit (2–14)
2010 (2) Chicago (11–5)(6) Green Bay (10–6) Detroit (6–10) Minnesota (6–10)
2011 (1) Green Bay (15–1)(6) Detroit (10–6) Chicago (8–8) Minnesota (3–13)
2012 (3) Green Bay (11–5)(6) Minnesota (10–6) Chicago (10–6) Detroit (4–12)
2013 (4) Green Bay (8–7–1) Chicago (8–8) Detroit (7–9) Minnesota (5–10–1)
2014 (2) Green Bay (12–4)(6) Detroit (11–5) Minnesota (7–9) Chicago (5–11)
2015 (3) Minnesota (11–5)(5) Green Bay (10–6) Detroit (7–9) Chicago (6–10)
2016 (4) Green Bay (10–6)(6) Detroit (9–7) Minnesota (8–8) Chicago (3–13)
2017 (2) Minnesota (13–3) Detroit (9–7) Green Bay (7–9) Chicago (5–11)
2018 (3) Chicago (12–4) Minnesota (8–7–1) Green Bay (6–9–1) Detroit (6–10)
2019 (2) Green Bay (13–3)(6) Minnesota (10–6) Chicago (8–8) Detroit (3–12–1)
2020 (1) Green Bay (13–3)(7) Chicago (8–8) Minnesota (7–9) Detroit (5–11)
2021 (1) Green Bay (13–4) Minnesota (8–9) Chicago (6–11) Detroit (3–13–1)
2022 (3) Minnesota (13–4) Detroit (9–8) Green Bay (8–9) Chicago (3–14)
2023 (3) Detroit (12–5)(7) Green Bay (9–8) Minnesota (7–10) Chicago (7–10)

Schedule assignments

YearOpponents
Interconf.Intraconf.17th Opponent
2023 AFC West NFC South AFC North
(away)
2024 AFC South NFC West AFC East
(home)
2025AFC North NFC East AFC West
(away)
2026AFC East NFC South AFC South
(home)
2027AFC West NFC West AFC North
(away)
2028AFC South NFC East AFC East
(home)
2029AFC North NFC South AFC West
(away)

See also

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The National Football Conference – Eastern Division or NFC East is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It currently has four members: the Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants, Philadelphia Eagles, and the Washington Commanders.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1982 NFL season</span> 1982 National Football League season

The 1982 NFL season was the 63rd regular season of the National Football League. A 57-day-long players' strike reduced the 1982 season from a 16-game schedule per team to an abbreviated nine game schedule. Because of the shortened season, the NFL adopted a special 16-team playoff tournament; division standings were ignored for seeding. Eight teams from each conference were seeded 1–8 based on their regular season records. Two teams qualified for the playoffs despite losing records. The season ended with Super Bowl XVII when the Washington Redskins defeated the Miami Dolphins 27–17 at the Rose Bowl.

The 1976 NFL season was the 57th regular season of the National Football League. The league expanded to 28 teams with the addition of Seattle Seahawks and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. This fulfilled one of the conditions agreed to in 1966 for the 1970 AFL–NFL merger, which called for the league to expand to 28 teams by 1970 or soon thereafter.

The 1975 NFL season was the 56th regular season of the National Football League.

The 1970 NFL season was the 51st regular season of the National Football League, and the first after the consummation of the AFL–NFL merger. The merged league realigned into two conferences: all ten of the American Football League (AFL) teams joined the Baltimore Colts, Cleveland Browns, and Pittsburgh Steelers to form the American Football Conference (AFC); the other thirteen NFL clubs formed the National Football Conference (NFC).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">History of the Green Bay Packers</span>

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team that has played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) since 1921. The team was founded in 1919 by Curly Lambeau and George Whitney Calhoun, and for the next two years played against local teams in Wisconsin and the upper peninsula of Michigan. In 1921, the Packers joined the American Professional Football Association, the precursor to the NFL, with Curly Lambeau as their coach. After falling into financial trouble, the Green Bay Football Corporation, now known as Green Bay Packers, Inc., was formed in 1923. The Packers became a publicly owned football team run by a board of directors elected each year. The team went on to win six NFL championships from 1929 to 1944, including three straight (1929–1931). Along the way, Curly Lambeau, with the help of receiver Don Hutson, revolutionized football through the development and utilization of the forward pass.

The 2001 Chicago Bears season was their 82nd regular season and 23rd postseason completed in the National Football League (NFL). The team finished with a 13–3 record under head coach Dick Jauron en route to an NFC Central title and the number two seed in the NFC. With former 1st round pick Cade McNown being traded during training camp, the Bears were led by Jim Miller. The team had five comeback wins during the season, including two straight improbable wins where safety Mike Brown returned an interception for the game-winning touchdown in overtime. However, the Bears were upset at home by the Philadelphia Eagles 33–19 in the NFC Divisional playoffs.

The 1997 Green Bay Packers season was their 79th season overall and their 77th in the National Football League (NFL). The season concluded with the team winning its second consecutive NFC championship, but losing 31–24 to John Elway's Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XXXII. The heavily favored team narrowly missed its opportunity to post back-to-back Super Bowl wins.

The Minnesota Vikings are an American football team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. After initially committing to become one of the founding members of the American Football League (AFL) in 1959, the team joined the National Football League (NFL) as an expansion franchise and played their first game in 1961, as part of the Western Conference. In 1967, they were placed into the new Central division, which became part of the National Football Conference following the AFL–NFL merger in 1970. The divisions were reorganized again in 2002, with the Vikings as part of the NFC North, in which they have played ever since. The Vikings have won their division 20 times and appeared in the playoffs 30 times, leading to four conference championships and one NFL title in 1969.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bears–Packers rivalry</span> National Football League rivalry

The Bears–Packers rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Chicago Bears and the Green Bay Packers. The two teams have a combined 70 members in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, have won a combined 22 NFL championships, and includes five Super Bowl championships. They hold the top two spots for most wins all-time; the Bears had the record from 1921 until 2022, when the Packers took over in a game between the two teams, who were tied at 786 wins going into the game.

As with all sports leagues, there are several significant rivalries between teams and notable players in the National Football League (NFL). Rivalries are occasionally created due to a particular event that causes bad blood between teams, players, coaches, or owners, but for the most part, they arise simply due to the frequency with which some teams play each other and sometimes exist for geographic reasons.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lions–Packers rivalry</span> National Football League rivalry

The Lions–Packers rivalry is an NFL rivalry between the Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers. They first met in 1930 when the Lions were known as the Portsmouth Spartans and based in Portsmouth, Ohio. The team eventually moved to Detroit for the 1934 season.

References

  1. "Lions complete 1st 0-16 season in league history - NFL- NBC Sports". Nbcsports.msnbc.com. December 28, 2008. Archived from the original on December 29, 2008. Retrieved September 8, 2012.