1987 NFL season

Last updated

1987 National Football League season
Regular season
DurationSeptember 13, 1987 – December 28, 1987
A player's strike shortened the regular season to 15 games.
Playoffs
Start dateJanuary 3, 1988
AFC Champions Denver Broncos
NFC Champions Washington Redskins
Super Bowl XXII
DateJanuary 31, 1988
Site Jack Murphy Stadium, San Diego, California
Champions Washington Redskins
Pro Bowl
DateFebruary 7, 1988
Site Aloha Stadium
The San Diego Chargers hosting a pre-season game against the Los Angeles Rams at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium in 1987. Jack Murphy Stadium 1987.jpeg
The San Diego Chargers hosting a pre-season game against the Los Angeles Rams at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium in 1987.

The 1987 NFL season was the 68th regular season of the National Football League. This season featured games predominantly played by replacement players as the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA) players were on strike from weeks four to six. The season ended with Super Bowl XXII, with the Washington Redskins defeating the Denver Broncos 42–10 at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego. The Broncos suffered their second consecutive Super Bowl defeat.

Contents

Player movement

Transactions

Trades

Draft

The 1987 NFL Draft was held from April 28 to 29, 1987, at New York City's Marriott Marquis. With the first pick, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers selected quarterback Vinny Testaverde from the University of Miami.

Referee changes

Chuck Heberling retired during the 1987 off-season. He joined the NFL in 1965 as a line judge before being promoted to referee in 1972. Games that he officiated include the Hail Mary Game and The Drive. Fred Silva, who was a swing official in 1986, was given his own crew again.

Major rule changes

The NFLPA Strike

A 24-day players' strike was called after Week 2. The games that were scheduled for the third week of the season were cancelled, reducing the 16-game season to 15, but the games for Weeks 4, 5 and 6 were played with replacement players, after which the union voted to end the strike. Approximately 15% of the NFLPA’s players chose to cross picket lines to play during the strike; prominent players who did so included New York Jets defensive end Mark Gastineau, Dallas Cowboys defensive tackle Randy White, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Joe Montana, 49ers running back Roger Craig, New England Patriots quarterback Doug Flutie and Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Steve Largent. [2] The replacement players were mostly those left out of work by the recent folding of the Canadian Football League’s Montreal Alouettes and the 1986 dissolution of the United States Football League, as well as others who had been preseason cuts, had long left professional football or were other assorted oddities (such as cinematographer Todd Schlopy, who, despite never playing professional football before or after the strike, served as placekicker for his hometown Buffalo Bills for three games). The replacement players, called to play on short notice and having little chance to jell as teammates, were widely treated with scorn by the press and general public, including name-calling, public shaming and accusations of being scabs. The games played by these replacement players were regarded with even less legitimacy – attendance plummeted to under 10,000 fans at many of the games in smaller markets and cities with strong union presence, including a low of 4,074 for the lone replacement game played in Philadelphia) — but nonetheless were counted as regular NFL games. [3] Final television revenues were down by about 20%, a smaller drop than the networks had expected. [4] The defending Super Bowl champion New York Giants went 0–3 in replacement games, ultimately costing them a chance to make the playoffs and to repeat their championship. The final replacement game was a Monday Night Football matchup on October 19, 1987, with the Washington Redskins at the Dallas Cowboys. Along with the Philadelphia Eagles, the Redskins were the only other NFL team not to have any players cross the picket line and were surprising 13–7 victors over the Cowboys who had plenty of big name players cross the picket line.

The 2017 film Year of the Scab, which aired as part of the ESPN series 30 for 30 , documented the story of the replacement players who crossed the picket line to play for the Redskins. [5] [6] A fictionalized account based on the 1987 strike formed the basis of the film The Replacements .

To date, the 1987 NFLPA strike was the last major interruption to an NFL regular season.

American Bowl

A series of National Football League pre-season exhibition games that were held at sites outside the United States, the only American Bowl game in 1987 was held at London’s Wembley Stadium.

DateWinning TeamScoreLosing TeamScoreStadiumCity
August 9, 1987 Los Angeles Rams 28 Denver Broncos 27 Wembley Stadium Flag of the United Kingdom.svg London

Regular season

Scheduling formula

    Inter-conference
AFC East vs NFC East
AFC Central vs NFC West
AFC West vs NFC Central

Highlights of the 1987 season included:

Final standings

Tiebreakers

Playoffs

Jan. 9 – Candlestick Park
5Minnesota36
Jan. 3 – Louisiana Superdome Jan. 17 – RFK Stadium
1 San Francisco 24
NFC
5 Minnesota 445Minnesota10
Jan. 10 – Soldier Field
4 New Orleans 103Washington17
NFC Championship
3 Washington 21
Jan. 31 – Jack Murphy Stadium
2 Chicago 17
Divisional playoffs
Wild Card playoffsN3Washington42
Jan. 9 – Cleveland Stadium
A1Denver10
Super Bowl XXII
3 Indianapolis 21
Jan. 3 – Astrodome Jan. 17 – Mile High Stadium
2 Cleveland 38
AFC
5 Seattle 202Cleveland33
Jan. 10 – Mile High Stadium
4 Houston 23*1Denver38
AFC Championship
4Houston10
1 Denver 34


* Indicates overtime victory

Awards

As awarded by the Associated Press
Most Valuable Player John Elway, Quarterback, Denver
Coach of the Year Jim Mora, New Orleans
Offensive Player of the Year Jerry Rice, Wide receiver, San Francisco
Defensive Player of the Year Reggie White, Defensive end, Philadelphia
Offensive Rookie of the Year Troy Stradford, Running back, Miami
Defensive Rookie of the Year Shane Conlan, Linebacker, Buffalo
NFL Comeback Player of the Year Charles White, Running back, LA Rams
NFL Man of the Year Dave Duerson, Safety, Chicago
Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Doug Williams, Quarterback, Washington

Coaching changes

Stadium changes

The Miami Dolphins began playing at their new home, Joe Robbie Stadium, moving from the Miami Orange Bowl. This was also the Cardinals' final season at Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis; the team relocated to Tempe, Arizona, the following season.

Media changes

The eight-year old ESPN cable network became the first cable television broadcaster of the league, with its program ESPN Sunday Night NFL (subsequently rebranded as ESPN Sunday Night Football ) debuting on November 8, 1987, broadcasting a series of Sunday night games during the second half of the season.

Uniform changes

Related Research Articles

Indianapolis Colts National Football League franchise in Indianapolis, Indiana

The Indianapolis Colts are an American football team based in Indianapolis. The Colts compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) South division. Since the 2008 season, the Colts have played their games in Lucas Oil Stadium. Previously, the team had played for over two decades (1984–2007) at the RCA Dome. Since 1987, the Colts have served as the host team for the NFL Scouting Combine.

Frank Michael Reich Jr. is an American football coach and former quarterback who is the head coach for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL). He previously played in the NFL for 14 seasons, primarily with the Buffalo Bills, who selected him in the third round of the 1985 NFL draft. Reich spent most of his career backing up Jim Kelly, although he achieved recognition in football lore when he led the Bills to the NFL's largest comeback during the 1992–93 NFL playoffs.

Jeffrey Marc Zgonina is an American football assistant defensive line coach for the Washington Football Team and former defensive tackle who played seventeen seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Purdue University and was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the seventh round of the 1993 NFL Draft.

The 1992 NFL season was the 73rd regular season of the National Football League. Due to the damage caused by Hurricane Andrew, the New England Patriots at Miami Dolphins game that was scheduled for September 6 at Joe Robbie Stadium was rescheduled to October 18. Both teams originally had that weekend off. This marked the first time since the 1966 NFL season and the AFL seasons of 1966 and 1967 that there were byes in week 1; in those years, byes were necessary every week since there were an odd number of teams, which would happen again between 1999 and 2001. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Dolphins also had their 2017 season opener postponed due to Hurricane Irma.

1984 NFL season Sports season

The 1984 NFL season was the 65th regular season of the National Football League. The Colts relocated from Baltimore, Maryland to Indianapolis, Indiana before the season.

Gary Keith Hogeboom is an American former football quarterback, real estate developer, and television personality. He played in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Indianapolis Colts and Phoenix Cardinals. Hogeboom played college football at Central Michigan University. He was a contestant on the CBS reality TV show Survivor: Guatemala.

The 2007 NFL season was the 88th regular season of the National Football League.

LaRon Landry American football safety

LaRon Louis Landry is a former American football safety. He played college football for Louisiana State University (LSU), and earned consensus All-American honors. The Washington Redskins drafted him with the sixth overall pick in the 2007 NFL Draft. He also played for the New York Jets and Indianapolis Colts.

The 1987 season was the Chicago Bears' 68th in the National Football League the 18th post-season completed in the NFL, and their sixth under head coach Mike Ditka. The team was looking to return to the playoffs, win the NFC Central Division for the fourth consecutive year and avenge their loss in the Divisional Playoffs to the Washington Redskins the year before when the team finished 14–2.

The 1987 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's strike shortened 50th season in the National Football League, their 40th overall, and their 42nd in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The season saw the Rams attempting to improve on their 10-6 record from 1986 and make the playoffs for the 5th straight season. However, the Rams struggled right out the gate. In their first 2 games against the Houston Oilers and Minnesota Vikings, the Rams had 4th quarter leads and blew them. They led 13-0 in the 4th quarter at Houston and lost 20-16, while they led 16-14 at home against Minnesota and lost 21-16. The next week, a strike occurred which wiped out all week 3 games. As a result, their game at home against the Cincinnati Bengals was canceled. One week later, the Rams were thumped by the Saints 37-10 to start the season 0-3, their first such start since 1982, which was, ironically, also a season that saw a strike take place. The Rams finally got in the win column the next week, beating the Pittsburgh Steelers at home, 31-21. However, the next week in Atlanta, the Rams lost another big lead, this time after leading 17-0 at halftime and 20-7 in the 4th quarter. This was followed by embarrassing losses to the Cleveland Browns (30-17), the arch-rival San Francisco 49ers (31-10), and the Saints again (31-14) to drop to 1-7, their worst start since 1965, when they started 1-9. However, the Rams then caught fire, beating the St. Louis Cardinals in St. Louis, 27-24, after trailing 24-14 in the 3rd quarter. The next week in Washington, the Rams outlasted the Washington Redskins on Monday Night Football 30-26, and it appeared as though the Rams were poised to get back in the playoff race. The win over Washington was followed by blowout wins over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (35-3), Detroit Lions (37-16), and Atlanta Falcons (33-0) and the Rams were looking to make an improbable in-season turnaround. However, the next week against the Dallas Cowboys, the Rams lost 29-21 to eliminate them from the playoffs. The season ended with the Rams getting pummeled by the 49ers on the road, 48-0. Ultimately, the Rams finished the strike-shortened season 6-9 and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1982.

The 1987 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 12th season in the National Football League the 12th playing their home games at Tampa Stadium and the first under head coach Ray Perkins. It was a year of great change for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ organization in the National Football League. Perkins had only needed three seasons to build the Giants into a playoff team, and it was hoped that he would be able to repeat the feat with the Buccaneers. They improved over their 2–14 record from 1986 and finished 4–11.

1987 Washington Redskins season

The 1987 season was the Washington Redskins' strike-shortened 56th season in the National Football League (NFL), their 52nd in Washington, D.C. and their seventh under head coach Joe Gibbs. The season was a shortened due to the 1987 NFL strike.

The 1987 Buffalo Bills season was the franchise's 18th season in the National Football League, and the 28th overall.

1987 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1987 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 55th in the National Football League (NFL). Despite the interruption of the schedule by the second strike in six seasons, the team improved upon their previous output of 5–10–1, going 7–8. However, three of those losses came during the three-game stretch during the strike when teams were staffed primarily with replacement players, or "scabs," who crossed the picket lines to suit up. Despite the improvement, the team once again failed to qualify for the playoffs.

Arthur Jones (American football) American football defensive end

Arthur Willis Jones III is a former American football defensive end who played eight seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Syracuse. He was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in the fifth round of the 2010 NFL Draft and won Super Bowl XLVII with them. Jones has also played for the Indianapolis Colts and Washington Redskins. He is also the older brother of former UFC Light Heavyweight Champion Jon Jones, and defensive end Chandler Jones of the Arizona Cardinals.

The 2011 NFL season was the 92nd regular season of the National Football League and the 46th of the Super Bowl era. It began on Thursday, September 8, 2011, with the Super Bowl XLV champion Green Bay Packers defeating the Super Bowl XLIV champion New Orleans Saints 42–34 at Lambeau Field and ended with Super Bowl XLVI, the league's championship game, on February 5, 2012, at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis where the New York Giants defeated the New England Patriots 21–17.

History of the Baltimore Colts History of NFL team

The professional American football team now known as the Indianapolis Colts played in Baltimore, Maryland, as the Baltimore Colts from its founding in 1953 to 1984. The team was named for Baltimore's history of horse breeding and racing. It was the second incarnation of the Baltimore Colts, the first having played for three years in the All-America Football Conference and one in the National Football League (NFL). The 1953–83 Baltimore Colts team played its home games at Memorial Stadium.

Gary Anthony Padjen is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League for the Baltimore Colts and Indianapolis Colts. He played college football at Arizona State University.he also had an exciting career with the CFL beating out Steve Mills before joining Colts in strike shortened season. A wonderful father husband father

References

Footnotes

  1. NFL 2001 Record and Fact Book, Workman Publishing Co, New York, NY, ISBN   0-7611-2480-2, p.286
  2. Merrill, Elizabeth (June 9, 2011). "NFL replacements part of history". ESPN. Retrieved September 16, 2017.
  3. Farnsworth, Clare (October 3, 2001). "NFL crossed the line on Replacement Sunday". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved September 16, 2017.
  4. "N.F.L. TV Ratings Drop". The New York Times. October 9, 1987. Retrieved September 16, 2017.
  5. Allen, Scott (September 13, 2017). "Joe Gibbs won't say it, but 1987 Redskins replacements deserve Super Bowl rings". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 16, 2017.
  6. Weber, Greta (May 26, 2017). "An ESPN Documentary About the 1987 Redskins Replacement Players Is the Ultimate Underdog Story You've Never Heard". Washingtonian. Retrieved September 16, 2017.