1937 NFL season

Last updated

1937 National Football League season
Regular season
DurationSeptember 5 – December 12, 1937
East Champions Washington Redskins
West Champions Chicago Bears
Championship Game
Champions Washington Redskins

The 1937 NFL season was the 18th regular season of the National Football League. The Cleveland Rams joined the league as an expansion team. Meanwhile, the Redskins relocated from Boston to Washington, D.C.

Contents

The season ended when the Redskins, led by rookie quarterback Sammy Baugh, defeated the Chicago Bears in the NFL Championship Game.

Major rule changes

Division races

Midway through the NFL's 11-game season, the Bears were unbeaten (5–0) in the Western Division, while the Giants were leaders in the Eastern (4–1), and they played to a 3–3 tie. The Giants and Bears continued to stay in the lead in their divisions, and the Bears clinched a spot in the title game with its 13–0 win over Detroit. On December 5, the final game of the season had Washington (7–3 and .700) traveling to New York (6–2–2 and .750). A win or a tie would have given the Giants the Eastern title; the Redskins triumphed, 49–14, and got the division crown and the trip to face Chicago in the 1937 championship game.

Final standings

NFL Eastern Division
WLTPCTDIVPFPASTK
Washington Redskins 830.7276–2195120W3
New York Giants 632.6675–2–1128109L1
Pittsburgh Pirates 470.3644–4122145L1
Brooklyn Dodgers 371.3002–5–182174T1
Philadelphia Eagles 281.2002–686177L1

Note: Tie games were not officially counted in the standings until 1972.

NFL Western Division
WLTPCTDIVPFPASTK
Chicago Bears 911.9007–1201100W4
Green Bay Packers 740.6366–2220122L2
Detroit Lions 740.6364–4180105L1
Chicago Cardinals 551.5003–5135165L2
Cleveland Rams 1100.0910–875207L9

NFL Championship Game

Washington 28, Chi. Bears 21, at Wrigley Field, Chicago, December 12, 1937

League leaders

StatisticNameTeamYards
Passing Sammy Baugh Washington1127
Rushing Cliff Battles Washington874
Receiving Gaynell Tinsley Chicago Cardinals675

Draft

The 1937 NFL Draft was held on December 12, 1936 at New York City's Hotel Lincoln. With the first pick, the Philadelphia Eagles selected runningback Sam Francis from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

Coaching changes

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