1947 NFL season

Last updated

1947 National Football League season
Regular season
DurationSeptember 21 –
December 28, 1947
East Champions Philadelphia Eagles (playoff)
West Champions Chicago Cardinals
Championship Game
Champions Chicago Cardinals

The 1947 NFL season was the 28th regular season of the National Football League. The league expanded the regular season by one game from eleven games per team to twelve, a number that remained constant for fourteen seasons, through 1960.

National Football League Professional American football league

The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league consisting of 32 teams, divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). The NFL is one of the four major professional sports leagues in North America, and the highest professional level of American football in the world. The NFL's 17-week regular season runs from early September to late December, with each team playing 16 games and having one bye week. Following the conclusion of the regular season, six teams from each conference advance to the playoffs, a single-elimination tournament culminating in the Super Bowl, which is usually held in the first Sunday in February, and is played between the champions of the NFC and AFC.

The 1960 NFL season was the 41st regular season of the National Football League.

Contents

The season ended when the Chicago Cardinals defeated the Philadelphia Eagles in the NFL Championship Game on December 28.

The 1947 Chicago Cardinals season was the franchise's 28th season in the National Football League. The Cardinals have won their second NFL championship against the Philadelphia Eagles. The team was led by its "Million Dollar Backfield" of Elmer Angsman, Charley Trippi, Paul Christman, and Pat Harder. As of the end of 2018, this is the team's last league championship. This championship drought is currently the longest active one in American professional sports. Until the 2018 season 71 years later, this also marked the last time the Cardinals beat the Green Bay Packers on the road.

The 1947 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 15th in the league. The team improved on their previous output of 6–5, winning eight games. The team qualified for the playoffs for the first time in fifteen seasons.

1947 NFL Championship Game

The 1947 National Football League Championship Game was the 15th annual National Football League (NFL) championship game, held December 28 at Comiskey Park in Chicago. The attendance was 30,759, well below capacity.

Major rule changes

Division races

Starting in 1947, the NFL teams played a 12-game schedule rather than 11 games. The twelfth game proved to be crucial for the Steelers, Eagles, Cardinals and Bears. In the Eastern Division, Pittsburgh took a half-game lead over Philadelphia after a 35–24 win in Week Five. On November 30, the Eagles won the rematch, 21–0, to take a 7–3–0 to 7–4–0 lead. The same day, the Cardinals lost to the Giants, 35–31, while the Bears beat Detroit 34–14; the 7–3–0 Cards were a game behind the 8–2–0 Bears in the Western Division.

In Week Twelve, the Cardinals beat the Eagles, 45–21. Pittsburgh beat Boston 17–7, while the Bears lost to the Rams, 17–14. The result was that the Steelers finished at 8–4, and the 7–4 Eagles had to win their last game. The Cardinals and Bears were both at 8–3, and the Western title would go to the winner of their December 14 season-closer. A crowd of 48,632 turned out at Wrigley Field to watch. The Cardinals won the game, 30–21, and the right to host the championship. The same day, Philadelphia beat Green Bay, 28–14, to force a playoff with Pittsburgh.

Final standings

W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, PCT= Winning Percentage, PF= Points For, PA = Points AgainstNote: The NFL did not officially count tie games in the standings until 1972

Eastern Division
TeamWLTPCTPFPA
Philadelphia Eagles 840.667308242
Pittsburgh Steelers 840.667240259
Boston Yanks 471.364168256
Washington Redskins 480.333295367
New York Giants 282.200190309
Western Division
TeamWLTPCTPFPA
Chicago Cardinals 930.750306231
Chicago Bears 840.667363241
Green Bay Packers 651.545274210
Los Angeles Rams 660.500259214
Detroit Lions 390.250231305

Playoffs

See: 1947 NFL playoffs

Home team in capitals

Eastern Division Playoff Game

NFL Championship Game

League leaders

StatisticNameTeamTotal
Passing Yards Sammy Baugh Washington Redskins 2938
Completion PercentageSammy BaughWashington Redskins.593 (210-for-354)
Touchdown PassesSammy BaughWashington Redskins25
Rushing: Yards Steve Van Buren Philadelphia Eagles 1008
Rushing: TouchdownsSteve Van BurenPhiladelphia Eagles13
Receiving: Yards Mal Kutner Chicago Cardinals 944
Receiving: Catches Jim Keane Chicago Bears 64
Receiving: Touchdowns Ken Kavanaugh Chicago Bears 13
Total Points Scored Pat Harder Chicago Cardinals102
Punting: Average George Gulyanics Chicago Bears44.8
Interceptions Frank Reagan New York Giants 10
Frank Seno Boston Yanks 10

Draft

The 1947 NFL Draft was held on December 16, 1946 at New York City's Commodore Hotel. With the first pick, the Chicago Bears selected halfback Bob Fenimore from Oklahoma State University–Stillwater.

The 1947 National Football League Draft was held on December 16, 1946, at the Commodore Hotel in New York City, New York.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States and in the U.S. state of New York. With an estimated 2017 population of 8,622,698 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 20,320,876 people in its 2017 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 23,876,155 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Grand Hyatt New York Hotel in New York City

The Grand Hyatt New York is a hotel located directly east of the Grand Central Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Originally named The Commodore Hotel, it opened on January 28, 1919. In 1980, Donald Trump encased the outside of the building in glass and renovated the inside as part of his first construction project in Manhattan. The hotel's demolition and replacement was announced in February 2019.

Coaching changes

Boston Yanks National Football League team based in Boston, Massachusetts

The Boston Yanks were a National Football League team based in Boston, Massachusetts that played from 1944 to 1948. The team played its home games at Fenway Park. Any games that conflicted with the Boston Red Sox baseball schedule in the American League were held at Braves Field of the cross-town National League team, the Boston Braves. Team owner Ted Collins, who managed singer and TV show host Kate Smith, (1907–1986), for thirty years, picked the name "Yanks" because he originally wanted to run a team that played at New York City's old Yankee Stadium. The Yanks could manage only a losing 2–8 record during their first regular season.

Herbert M. "Herb" Kopf was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Manhattan College from 1938 to 1942 and as the head coach for the Boston Yanks of the National Football League (NFL) from 1944 to 1946.

Maurice J. "Clipper" Smith was an American football player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at Gonzaga University (1925–1928), Santa Clara University (1929–1935), Villanova College—now known as Villanova University (1936–1942), the University of San Francisco (1946), and Lafayette College (1949–1951), compiling a career college football record of 108–76–12. Smith was also the head coach of the National Football League's Boston Yanks from 1947 to 1948, tallying a mark of 7–16–1. In addition, he was the head basketball coach at Gonzaga from 1925 to 1929 and the head baseball coach at the school for one season in 1926, notching a record of 4–11.

Footnotes

  1. Strickler, George (February 20, 1965). "Sixth N.F.L. official to watch scramblers, clock". Chicago Tribune. p. 1, sec. 2.

Further reading

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

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