Charles White (American football)

Last updated
Charles White
No. 25, 33
Position: Running back
Personal information
Born: (1958-01-22) January 22, 1958 (age 63)
Los Angeles, California
Height:5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school: San Fernando (CA)
College: USC
NFL Draft: 1980  / Round: 1 / Pick: 27
Career history
As a player:
As a coach:
  • USC (RB) (1993–1997)
Career highlights and awards
NFL
College
Career NFL statistics
Rushing yards:3,075
Average:3.9
Touchdowns:24
Player stats at NFL.com

Charles Raymond White (born January 22, 1958) is a former professional American football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons during the 1980s.

Contents

He played college football for the University of Southern California, where he was an All-American and the winner of the Heisman Trophy. A first-round pick (27th overall) in the 1980 NFL Draft, [1] he played professionally for the Cleveland Browns and the Los Angeles Rams of the NFL.

Early life

White was born in Los Angeles, California. He graduated from San Fernando High School in San Fernando, California, where as a track and field athlete he won the 330 yard low hurdles at the CIF California State Meet over future Olympic Gold medalist Andre Phillips. [2] He was also a standout high school football player.

College career

White attended the University of Southern California, where he played for the USC Trojans football team. In 1978, White won the W.J. Voit Memorial Trophy as the outstanding college football player on the Pacific Coast. In 1979, he received the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, and was named UPI Player of the Year. He is the second player in Rose Bowl history (of four, total) to be honored as Player of the Game twice (1979 and 1980).[ citation needed ]

College statistics

Legend
Led the Pac-8/Pac-10
Pac-8/Pac-10 record
Led the NCAA
NCAA Record
BoldCareer high
College rushing & receiving statistics* [3]
SeasonSchoolGamesAttYdsAvgTDRecYdsAvgTD
TeamRushingReceiving
1976 USC 121568585.51066510.81
1977 USC 122851,4785.27913815.32
1978 USC 133741,8595.013221938.81
1979 USC 123322,0506.219221456.60
Career USC 491,1476,2455.449595419.24

* Includes bowl games.

Professional career

White was selected in the 1st round, 27th overall pick in the 1980 NFL Draft by the Cleveland Browns. After four disappointing seasons in Cleveland, where he rushed for a total of 942 yards and had a 3.4 yards per carry average, White was released before the start of the 1985 season. White later acknowledged that he struggled with cocaine addiction during this period. [4]

After his release from the Browns in 1985, he reunited with his college coach, John Robinson, who was now coaching the Los Angeles Rams. White would play for the Rams for three seasons, 1985–1987. In 1987, he rushed for a league-leading 1,387 yards and 11 touchdowns, which earned him a Pro Bowl selection and the NFL Comeback Player of the Year Award.

White finished his NFL career with 3,075 rushing yards, and 23 rushing touchdowns, along with 114 receptions, 860 yards, and one receiving touchdown.

American Gladiators

In its third and fourth seasons, American Gladiators held special "Pro Football Challenge of Champions" shows. White participated in and won both, each time coming from behind in the "Eliminator" thanks to slip-ups by his opponents. [5] He also competed in sixth season's USC vs. Notre Dame alumni special where he also won, giving him a 3-0 record on the show.

Personal life and drug use

During his years at USC, White struggled with cocaine and marijuana use. In a 1987 Sports Illustrated article, he admitted to smoking marijuana daily at USC and snorted his first line of cocaine a few weeks before the 1977 Rose Bowl. He met fellow USC student Judi McGovern and the two dated throughout their time at USC, eventually marrying and having a daughter. However, White continued his cocaine use through college and on into his early NFL career with the Browns. White checked into drug rehab in 1982 and was clean for three years. Even so, the Browns cut him in 1985 and he was picked up on waivers by the Los Angeles Rams, where he was reunited with John Robinson, his former college coach at USC.

White soon had a short relapse into cocaine, but got clean again until one night in August 1987, where he and a friend did lines until White was arrested. However, Robinson bailed him out of jail and agreed to keep him on the team if he stayed clean. White responded with the best season of his career in the strike-affected 1987 season, running for 339 yards in the three "scab games" after the Rams traded Eric Dickerson and then for 100 yards in five straight games afterwards. [6]

White and McGovern eventually divorced. White sold his 1979 Heisman trophy in 2008 to settle tax debts. White has five children, three daughters and two sons. [7]

Post-playing career

In 1993, White joined USC as running backs coach and today is a computer consultant. [8]

See also

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References

  1. "Charles White". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved September 6, 2012.
  2. "California State Meet Results - 1915 to present". Hank Lawson. Archived from the original on 2014-10-06. Retrieved 2012-12-25.
  3. "Charles White college statistics". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  4. "Catching Up With Charles White". CNN. Retrieved 2007-12-10.
  5. "American Gladiators". tv.com. Retrieved September 6, 2012.
  6. https://www.si.com/vault/1988/08/29/118271/a-visit-to-hell-charles-white-won-the-heisman-in-1979-and-was-the-nfls-leading-rusher-last-year-but-in-between-life-was-a-nightmare-for-him-and-his-wife-judi
  7. https://articles.latimes.com/2008/nov/17/sports/sp-crowe17
  8. "Charles White". Premiere Athlete & Celebrity. Retrieved September 6, 2012.