List of Major League Soccer stadiums

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Major League Soccer (MLS) is the premier professional soccer league in the United States and Canada. The league has 24 teams in 24 stadiums as of the 2019 season: 21 in the United States and 3 in Canada. At the time of the league's inauguration in 1996, MLS teams used multi-purpose stadiums, often shared with National Football League (NFL) or college football teams. Because of lower attendance, these stadiums had parts tarped off to artificially reduce capacity. Starting in 1999 with the Columbus Crew's construction of Mapfre Stadium, the league has constructed soccer-specific stadiums which are tailor-made for soccer and which have smaller capacity. Today, the majority of MLS stadiums are soccer-specific stadiums.

Major League Soccer Professional soccer league

Major League Soccer (MLS) is a men's professional soccer league sanctioned by the United States Soccer Federation which represents the sport's highest level in the United States. The league comprises 24 teams—21 in the U.S. and 3 in Canada and constitutes one of the major professional sports leagues in both countries. The regular season runs from March to October, with each team playing 34 games; the team with the best record is awarded the Supporters' Shield. Fourteen teams compete in the postseason MLS Cup Playoffs through October and November, culminating in the championship game, the MLS Cup. MLS teams also play in domestic competitions against teams from other divisions in the U.S. Open Cup and in the Canadian Championship. MLS teams also compete against continental rivals in the CONCACAF Champions League. The league plans to expand to 27 teams with the addition of Inter Miami CF and Nashville SC in 2020 and Austin FC in 2021, with further plans to expand to 28 teams by 2022 and 30 teams at a later date.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Multi-purpose stadium type of stadium

Multi-purpose stadiums are a type of stadium designed to be easily used by multiple types of events. While any stadium could potentially host more than one type of sport or event, this concept usually refers to a specific design philosophy that stresses multifunctionality over specificity. It is used most commonly in Canada and the United States, where the two most popular outdoor team sports – football and baseball – require radically different facilities. Football uses a rectangular field, while baseball is played on a diamond and large outfield. This requires a particular design to accommodate both, usually an oval. While building stadiums in this way means that sports teams and governments can share costs, it also imposes some challenges.

Contents

Stadiums

The following is a list of current primary MLS stadiums.

Soccer-specific stadium
Actual capacity
(Reduced capacity)
Double-dagger-14-plain.png Stadiums with a retractable roof
ImageStadiumFranchiseLocationFirst MLS year in stadiumCapacityOpenedSurfaceField dimensionsCoordinatesRoof typeSoccer specificRef(s)
Allianz Field construction c2018.jpg Allianz Field Minnesota United FC Saint Paul, Minnesota 201919,4002019Grass115 yd × 75 yd (105 m × 69 m) 44°57′10″N93°9′54″W / 44.95278°N 93.16500°W / 44.95278; -93.16500 Coordinates: 44°57′10″N93°9′54″W / 44.95278°N 93.16500°W / 44.95278; -93.16500 OpenYes [1]
Audi Field June 25th.jpg Audi Field D.C. United Washington, D.C. 201820,000 [2] 2018Grass115 yd × 75 yd (105 m × 69 m) 38°52′6″N77°0′44″W / 38.86833°N 77.01222°W / 38.86833; -77.01222 (Audi Field) OpenYes [3]
Avaya Stadium, 1-7-15.jpg Avaya Stadium San Jose Earthquakes San Jose, California 201518,0002015Grass115 yd × 75 yd (105 m × 69 m) 37°21′5″N121°55′30″W / 37.35139°N 121.92500°W / 37.35139; -121.92500 (Avaya Stadium) OpenYes [4]
LAFC East Side Stadium interior.jpg Banc of California Stadium Los Angeles FC Los Angeles 201822,0002018Grass115 yd × 75 yd (105 m × 69 m) 34°00′47″N118°17′6″W / 34.01306°N 118.28500°W / 34.01306; -118.28500 (Banc of California Stadium) OpenYes [5]
BBVA Compass Stadium, Skyline View.JPG BBVA Compass Stadium Houston Dynamo Houston 201222,0392012Grass115 yd × 73 yd (105 m × 67 m) 29°45.132′N95°21.144′W / 29.752200°N 95.352400°W / 29.752200; -95.352400 (BBVA Compas Stadium) OpenYes [6] [7] [8]
BC Place 2011 Whitecaps.jpg BC Place Double-dagger-14-plain.png Vancouver Whitecaps FC Vancouver 201154,500
(22,120)
1983 Polytan 117 yd × 75 yd (107 m × 69 m) 49°16′36″N123°6′43″W / 49.27667°N 123.11194°W / 49.27667; -123.11194 (BC Place) RetractableNo [9] [10]
BMO Field in 2016.png BMO Field Toronto FC Toronto 200730,991 [note 1] 2007Grass115 yd × 74 yd (105 m × 68 m) 43°37′58″N79°25′07″W / 43.63278°N 79.41861°W / 43.63278; -79.41861 (BMO Field) OpenNo [11]
Soundersfcqwestfield.jpg CenturyLink Field Seattle Sounders FC Seattle 200969,000
(39,419)
2002 FieldTurf 114 yd × 74 yd (104 m × 68 m) 47°35′43″N122°19′54″W / 47.5952°N 122.3316°W / 47.5952; -122.3316 (CenturyLink Field) OpenNo [12] [13]
Sporting KC vs Houston Dynamo - 26 May 2013.JPG Children's Mercy Park Sporting Kansas City Kansas City, Kansas 201118,4672011Grass120 yd × 75 yd (110 m × 69 m) 39°07′18″N94°49′25″W / 39.1218°N 94.8237°W / 39.1218; -94.8237 (Children's Mercy Park) OpenYes [14]
Dick's Park.jpg Dick's Sporting Goods Park Colorado Rapids Commerce City, Colorado 200718,0612007Grass120 yd × 75 yd (110 m × 69 m) 39°48′20″N104°53′31″W / 39.80556°N 104.89194°W / 39.80556; -104.89194 (Dick's Sporting Goods Park) OpenYes [15]
LA Galaxy vs Houston Dynamo- Western Conference Finals panorama.jpg Dignity Health Sports Park LA Galaxy Carson, California 200327,000 [note 2] 2003Grass120 yd × 75 yd (110 m × 69 m) 33°51′52″N118°15′40″W / 33.86444°N 118.26111°W / 33.86444; -118.26111 (Dignity Health Sports Park) OpenNo [16]
Gillette Stadium.jpg Gillette Stadium New England Revolution Foxborough, Massachusetts 200265,878
(20,000)
2002 FieldTurf 115 yd × 75 yd (105 m × 69 m) 42°05′27.40″N71°15′51.64″W / 42.0909444°N 71.2643444°W / 42.0909444; -71.2643444 (Gillette Stadium) OpenNo [17]
Columbus crew stadium mls allstars 2005.jpg Mapfre Stadium Columbus Crew SC Columbus, Ohio 199919,9681999Grass115 yd × 75 yd (105 m × 69 m) 40°0′34″N82°59′28″W / 40.00944°N 82.99111°W / 40.00944; -82.99111 (Mapfre Stadium) OpenYes [18]
Mercedes Benz Stadium time lapse capture 2017-08-13.jpg Mercedes-Benz Stadium Double-dagger-14-plain.png Atlanta United FC Atlanta 201772,035
(42,500)
2017 FieldTurf 115 yd × 75 yd (105 m × 69 m) 33°45′19.30″N84°24′4.29″W / 33.7553611°N 84.4011917°W / 33.7553611; -84.4011917 (Mercedes-Benz Stadium) RetractableNo [19]
Nippert Stadium 2017-06-14 (35019636843).jpg Nippert Stadium FC Cincinnati Cincinnati 201940,000
(32,250)
1915 Act Global UBU Sports Speed M6-M115 yd × 75 yd (105 m × 69 m) 39°7′51.6″N84°30′57.6″W / 39.131000°N 84.516000°W / 39.131000; -84.516000 (Nippert Stadium) OpenNo [20]
Open House Event (32264010504).jpg Orlando City Stadium Orlando City SC Orlando, Florida 201725,5002017Grass120 yd × 75 yd (110 m × 69 m) 28°37′27.83″N81°23′20.53″W / 28.6243972°N 81.3890361°W / 28.6243972; -81.3890361 (Orlando City Stadium) OpenYes [21]
Jeldwenfield2011.png Providence Park Portland Timbers Portland, Oregon 2011≈25,0001926 FieldTurf 110 yd × 75 yd (101 m × 69 m) 45°31′17″N122°41′30″W / 45.52139°N 122.69167°W / 45.52139; -122.69167 (Providence Park) OpenNo [22] [23]
Red Bull Arena Harrison behind goal.jpg Red Bull Arena New York Red Bulls Harrison, New Jersey 201025,0002010Grass120 yd × 75 yd (110 m × 69 m) 40°44′12″N74°9′1″W / 40.73667°N 74.15028°W / 40.73667; -74.15028 (Red Bull Arena) OpenYes [24]
Rio Tinto Stadium.jpg Rio Tinto Stadium Real Salt Lake Sandy, Utah 200820,2132008Grass120 yd × 75 yd (110 m × 69 m) 40°34′59″N111°53′35″W / 40.582923°N 111.893156°W / 40.582923; -111.893156 (Rio TInto Stadium) OpenYes [25]
Stade Saputo.27.06.12.jpg Saputo Stadium Montreal Impact Montreal 201220,8012008Grass120 yd × 77 yd (110 m × 70 m) 45°33′47″N73°33′9″W / 45.56306°N 73.55250°W / 45.56306; -73.55250 (Saputo Stadium) OpenYes [26]
Toyota Park, 9 March 2013.jpg SeatGeek Stadium Chicago Fire Bridgeview, Illinois 200620,0002006Grass120 yd × 75 yd (110 m × 69 m) 41°45′53″N87°48′22″W / 41.76472°N 87.80611°W / 41.76472; -87.80611 (SeatGeek Stadium) OpenYes [27]
PPL Park Interior from the River End 2010.10.02 (cropped).jpg Talen Energy Stadium Philadelphia Union Chester, Pennsylvania 201018,5002010Grass120 yd × 75 yd (110 m × 69 m) 39°49′56″N75°22′44″W / 39.83222°N 75.37889°W / 39.83222; -75.37889 (Talen Energy Stadium) OpenYes [28]
Toyota Stadium.jpeg Toyota Stadium FC Dallas Frisco, Texas 200520,5002005Grass117 yd × 74 yd (107 m × 68 m) 33°9′16″N96°50′7″W / 33.15444°N 96.83528°W / 33.15444; -96.83528 (Toyota Stadium) OpenYes [29] [30]
Soccer at Yankee Stadium, August 2012.jpg Yankee Stadium New York City FC Bronx, New York 201547,309
(30,321)
2009Grass110 yd × 70 yd (101 m × 64 m) 40°49′45″N73°55′35″W / 40.82917°N 73.92639°W / 40.82917; -73.92639 (Yankee Stadium) OpenNo [31]

Other stadiums used

The following is a list of other current stadiums used by MLS teams for the U.S. Open Cup, CONCACAF Champions League, premier, special, or international friendly matches.

U.S. Open Cup association football knockout tournament in the USA

The Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup, commonly known as the U.S. Open Cup (USOC), is a knock-out cup competition in American soccer. It is the oldest ongoing national soccer competition in the U.S. The 105th edition, held in 2018, was contested by 97 clubs from the two professional leagues sanctioned by the United States Soccer Federation: Major League Soccer (MLS), and the United Soccer League, and also amateur clubs in the earlier rounds of the tournament after qualifying through their leagues. The overall champion earns a total of $300,000 in prize money, while the runner-up receives $100,000, and the furthest-advancing team from each lower division league receives $25,000. In addition, the tournament winner qualifies for the group stage of the CONCACAF Champions League.

CONCACAF Champions League football tournament

The CONCACAF Champions League is an annual continental club football competition organized by CONCACAF for the top football clubs in North America, Central America, and the Caribbean. The winner of the CONCACAF Champions League automatically qualifies for the quarter-finals of the FIFA Club World Cup. The tournament is officially known as the Scotiabank CONCACAF Champions League, since February 2015, due to sponsorship by Scotiabank. The competition has been completed 52 times through the 2016–17 event, with 54 champions due to a three-way shared title in the 1978 competition.

Soccer-specific stadium
Artificially reduced capacity
Dagger-14-plain.png Domed Stadiums
Double-dagger-14-plain.png Stadiums with a retractable roof
ImageStadiumFranchiseLocationYear Since UseCapacityOpenedSurfaceRoof TypeSoccer specificRef(s)
Le Citi Field.jpg Citi Field New York City FC Queens, New York 2017–41,9222009GrassOpenNo
NYC-NYCFC-2016.jpg Coffey Field New York City FC Bronx, New York 2014–7,0001930FieldTurfOpenNo
Fifth Third Bank Stadium, Kennesaw State University.JPG Fifth Third Bank Stadium Atlanta United FC Kennesaw, Georgia 2017–8,3182010Hybrid surfaceOpenNo
Renovated Kezar Stadium.jpg Kezar Stadium San Jose Earthquakes San Francisco 2012–3,8881990GrassOpenNo
Entering Levi's Stadium.JPG Levi's Stadium San Jose Earthquakes Santa Clara, California 2014–48,7652014GrassOpenNo [32]
Philly (45).JPG Lincoln Financial Field Philadelphia Union Philadelphia 2010–37,5002003GrassOpenNo [33]
Maureen Hendricks Field at Maryland Soccerplex.jpeg Maryland SoccerPlex D.C. United Germantown, Maryland 2001–3,2002000GrassOpenNo
Le Stade Olympique 3.jpg Olympic Stadium Dagger-14-plain.png Montreal Impact Montreal 2012–66,308
(61,004)
1976Xtreme Turf by Act GlobalDomed (Fixed)No
Rentschler Field.jpg Pratt & Whitney Stadium at Rentschler Field New York City FC East Hartford, Connecticut 2017–40,6422003GrassOpenNo
Toronto - ON - Rogers Centre (Nacht).jpg Rogers Centre Double-dagger-14-plain.png Toronto FC Toronto 2012–49,282
(47,568)
1989AstroTurf 3D XtremeRetractableNo
Stanford Stadium new.jpg Stanford Stadium San Jose Earthquakes Stanford, California 2011–50,0002006GrassOpenNo
Starfire Sports Complex - stadium field 01.jpg Starfire Sports Complex Seattle Sounders FC Tukwila, Washington 2009–4,5002005FieldTurfOpenNo

Future stadiums

The following is a table of future MLS stadiums that are undergoing construction, or have been approved for construction.

New York City FC [34] have had potential sites rejected by local governments and have yet to identify alternatives. In addition, the New England Revolution have reportedly been in negotiations over a potential site in South Boston. [35]

The New York City FC Stadium is a proposed soccer-specific stadium to be built in New York City for New York City FC of Major League Soccer. The team currently plays its home games at Yankee Stadium.

New England Revolution soccer club in the United States

The New England Revolution is an American professional soccer club based in the Greater Boston area that competes in Major League Soccer (MLS), in the Eastern Conference of the league. It is one of the ten charter clubs of MLS, having competed in the league since its inaugural season.

South Boston Neighborhood of Boston in Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States

South Boston is a densely populated neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, located south and east of the Fort Point Channel and abutting Dorchester Bay. South Boston, colloquially known as Southie, was once a predominantly working class Irish Catholic community, but is nowadays a hot spot for the millennial population.

Soccer-specific stadium
Artificially reduced capacity
Double-dagger-14-plain.png Stadiums with a retractable roof
StadiumFranchiseLocationCapacityConstruction
begin
Likely
opening
SurfaceRoof typeSoccer specificRef
West End Stadium FC Cincinnati Cincinnati, Ohio 26,00020182021GrassOpenYes [36]
Austin FC stadium Austin FC Austin, Texas 20,50020192021GrassOpenYes [37]
Nashville Fairgrounds Stadium Nashville SC Nashville, Tennessee 30,00020192022GrassOpenYes [38] [39]
Inter Miami CF stadium Inter Miami CF Miami, Florida 25,000TBD2021GrassOpenYes
New Crew Stadium Columbus Crew SC Columbus, Ohio 20,000TBD2021GrassOpenYes [40]

Former stadiums

The following is a list of former MLS stadiums.

Artificially reduced capacity
ImageStadiumFranchise(s)LocationUsed for MLSCapacityOpenedSurfaceRef(s)
061123Broncos-Chiefs02.jpg Arrowhead Stadium Kansas City Wizards Kansas City, Missouri 1996–200779,451
(20,269) [note 3]
1972Grass
BobbyDoddStadiumGTMiami2008.jpg Bobby Dodd Stadium Atlanta United FC Atlanta 201755,0001913Grass
Denver Colorado Invesco Field at Mile High.jpg Broncos Stadium at Mile High Colorado Rapids Denver, Colorado 2002–200676,125
(17,500)
2001Grass
BuckShaw5308.jpg Buck Shaw Stadium San Jose Earthquakes Santa Clara, California 2008–201410,5251962Grass [41]
Citrus Bowl Orlando City.jpg Camping World Stadium Orlando City SC Orlando, Florida 2015–201665,438
(19,500)
1936 AstroTurf [42]
Aerial shot Benedetti-Wehrli Stadium.jpg Cardinal Stadium Chicago Fire Naperville, Illinois 2002–200315,0001999FieldTurf
CommunityAmerica Ballpark2.JPG CommunityAmerica Ballpark Kansas City Wizards Kansas City, Kansas 2008–201010,3852003Grass
Cotton Bowl.JPG Cotton Bowl Dallas Burn Dallas, Texas 1996–2002, 200492,100
(25,425)
1932Grass
No image.svg Dragon Stadium Dallas Burn Southlake, Texas 200311,0002001
San Jose at Empire Field.jpg Empire Field Vancouver Whitecaps FC Vancouver, British Columbia 201120,5002010 FieldTurf [43]
Foxborostade.png Foxboro Stadium New England Revolution Foxborough, Massachusetts 1996–200160,292
(24,871)
1971Grass
New York Red Bull 1.jpg Giants Stadium New York Red Bulls
NY/NJ MetroStars
East Rutherford, New Jersey 1996–200978,148
(25,576)
1976Grass; AstroTurf; FieldTurf
Mile High Stadium on July 13, 1995.jpg Mile High Stadium Colorado Rapids Denver, Colorado 1996–200176,273
(17,500)
1948Grass
2005 Stanford-Navy Game at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.jpg Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium D.C. United Annapolis, Maryland 201834,0001959FieldTurf [44]
McAfee Coliseum soccer configuration.jpg Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum San Jose Earthquakes Oakland, California 2008–200963,132
(47,416)
1966Grass [41]
Skorry-ohiostadium 6048.jpg Ohio Stadium Columbus Crew Columbus, Ohio 1996–199889,841
(25,243) [note 4]
1922Grass [45] [46] [47]
Rfkstadium.png RFK Stadium D.C. United Washington, D.C. 1996–201745,596
(20,000)
1961Grass

[48]

RSL at Rice-Eccles.jpg Rice-Eccles Stadium Real Salt Lake Salt Lake City, Utah 2005–200845,634
(24,521)
1927FieldTurf
Robertson Gameday.jpg Robertson Stadium Houston Dynamo Houston, Texas 2005–201132,000
(25,462)
1941Grass
Inter vs Chelsea at the Rose Bowl.jpg Rose Bowl Los Angeles Galaxy Pasadena, California 1996–2002104,091
(26,000)
1922Grass
UsavsHonduras.JPG Soldier Field Chicago Fire Chicago 1998–2002, 2004–200561,500
(24,955)
1924Grass
SPStaSJ.jpg Spartan Stadium San Jose Earthquakes San Jose, California 1996–200531,218
(19,166)
1933Grass [41]
MNUFCTCF.jpeg TCF Bank Stadium Minnesota United FC Minneapolis 2017–201850,805
(21,895)
2009FieldTurf

Defunct teams

Artificially reduced capacity
ImageStadiumTeam(s)LocationUsed for MLSCapacityOpenedSurfaceField DimensionsRef(s)
Tampa Stadium1.jpg Houlihan's Stadium Tampa Bay Mutiny Tampa, Florida 1996–199816,000 [note 5] 1967Grassunknown
2008-0424-FL-LockhartStadium.jpg Lockhart Stadium Miami Fusion Fort Lauderdale, Florida 1998–200220,4501959Grass116 by 75 yards (106 m × 69 m)
Raymond James Stadium02.JPG Raymond James Stadium Tampa Bay Mutiny Tampa, Florida 1999–200232,000 [note 6] 1998Grass115 by 72 yards (105 m × 66 m)
LA Galaxy vs Houston Dynamo- Western Conference Finals panorama.jpg StubHub Center Chivas USA Carson, California 2005–2014 (Chivas USA)18,800 [note 7] 2003Grass120 by 75 yards (110 m × 69 m) [16]

See also

Notes

  1. Full MLS capacity, portion used by CFL: 26,500
  2. MLS capacity, NFL capacity: 30,000
  3. For most of the Wizards' history at Arrowhead, the team did not sell tickets in most of the stadium. At different times, either one side of the stadium or the upper seating bowl was tarped off.
  4. Ohio Stadium has a capacity for 104,944, but this was artificially reduced to 25,243 for regular games. The Crew's attendance record is however 31,000
  5. Portion used by MLS, full NFL capacity: 65,857
  6. Portion used by MLS, full NFL capacity: 65,857
  7. Portion used by Chivas USA, full capacity: 27,000

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