Queen Street, Melbourne

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Queen Street

Coloured postcard of Queen Street, Melbourne.jpg
Queen Street circa 1890
Queen Street, Melbourne
Australia Victoria metropolitan Melbourne location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Queen Street
Coordinates
General information
TypeStreet
Opened1837
Major junctions
North endAustralian state route 32.svg Victoria Street
North Melbourne
 
South endAustralian state route 30.svg Flinders Street
Melbourne CBD
Location(s)
Suburb(s) North Melbourne, Melbourne CBD
A classic underground toilet on Queen Street Queen Street Melbourne underground public toilet.jpg
A classic underground toilet on Queen Street

Queen Street is a street in the central business district of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The street forms part of the original Hoddle Grid and was laid out in 1837. [1] It runs roughly north-south and is primarily a commercial and financial thoroughfare of the city centre.

Contents

Queen Street is named for Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen. [2]

Geography

The northern end of Queen Street intersects with Victoria Street, while its southern end intersects with Flinders Street. Queen Street bisects the Queen Victoria Market into the dry section and wet section. [3]

Notable buildings

As part of the traditional financial district of Melbourne, Queen Street is home to many buildings listed on Victorian Heritage Register and/or classified by the National Trust of Australia. These include:

There are also many notable high-rise office buildings along Queen Street, including:

Architecture

Queen Street massacre

On 8 December 1987 an armed gunman killed 8 people and injured 5 others at the Australia Post offices at 191 Queen Street. The gunman Frank Vitkovic eventually fell from a building window taking the death toll to 9. [4]

A memorial window for the victims is located at Melbourne's GPO on Elizabeth and Bourke Streets. [5]

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hoddle Grid</span> Layout of the Melbourne central business district

Hoddle Grid is the contemporary name given to the approximately 1-by-0.5-mile grid of streets that form the Melbourne central business district, Australia. Bounded by Flinders Street, Spring Street, La Trobe Street, and Spencer Street, it lies at an angle to the rest of the Melbourne suburban grid, and so is easily recognisable. It is named after the surveyor Robert Hoddle, who marked it out in 1837, establishing the first formal town plan. This grid of streets, laid out when there were only a few hundred settlers, became the nucleus for what is now Melbourne, a city of over five million people.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Collins Street, Melbourne</span> Street in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Collins Street is a major street in the central business district of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It was laid out in the first survey of Melbourne, the original 1837 Hoddle Grid, and soon became the most desired address in the city. Collins Street was named after Lieutenant-Governor of Tasmania David Collins who led a group of settlers in establishing a short-lived settlement at Sorrento in 1803.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Flinders Street, Melbourne</span> Street in Melbourne, Victoria

Flinders Street is a street in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Running roughly parallel to the Yarra River, Flinders Street forms the southern edge of the Hoddle Grid. It is exactly 1 mi (1.609 km) in length and one and a half chains in width. It is named for the explorer Matthew Flinders, erroneously credited with discovering Port Phillip at the time of its naming. It extends eastwards as far as Spring Street and the Treasury Gardens and westwards past Batman's Hill to the Melbourne Docklands. As the closest street to the river, Flinders Street serviced Melbourne's original river port. Customs House, now the site for Victoria's Immigration Museum, is on Flinders Street.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Elizabeth Street, Melbourne</span> Road in Melbourne, Victoria

Elizabeth Street is one of the main streets in the central business district of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, part of the Hoddle Grid laid out in 1837. It is presumed to have been named in honour of governor Richard Bourke's wife.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Spring Street, Melbourne</span> Street in Melbourne, Victoria

Spring Street is a major street in the central business district of Melbourne, Australia. It runs roughly north-south and is the easternmost street in the original 1837 Hoddle Grid.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Russell Street, Melbourne</span> Street in Melbourne, Victoria

Russell Street is a main street and thoroughfare in the central business district of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It runs roughly north-south and was laid out as a core feature of the Hoddle Grid in 1837.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Exhibition Street</span> Street in Melbourne, Victoria

Exhibition Street is a major street in the central business district of Melbourne, Australia. The street is named after the International Exhibition held at the Royal Exhibition Building in 1880, and was previously known as Stephen Street from 1837. The street runs roughly north-south and was laid out as part of the original Hoddle Grid.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">King Street, Melbourne</span> Street in Melbourne

King Street is a main road in the central business district of Melbourne, Australia. It is considered a key hub of Melbourne's nightlife and is home to many pubs, nightclubs, restaurants, and adult entertainment venues.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">City Square, Melbourne</span>

The City Square was a public plaza located in the Central Business District (CBD) of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The site is currently bounded by Swanston Street, Collins Street, Flinders Lane and the Westin Hotel. The historic landmarks of Melbourne Town Hall and St Paul’s Cathedral are across the streets to the north and south respectively. The square has been redeveloped several times and associated with a number of controversies over the years.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lonsdale Street</span> Street in Melbourne, Victoria

Lonsdale Street is a main street and thoroughfare in the Melbourne central business district, Australia. It runs roughly east–west and was laid out in 1837 as one of Melbourne's original boundaries within the Hoddle Grid. The street extends from Spring Street in the east to Spencer Street in the west.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">William Street, Melbourne</span> Street in Melbourne, Victoria

William Street is a major street in the central business district of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It runs roughly north–south from Flinders Street to Victoria Street, and was laid out in 1837 as part of the original Hoddle Grid. The street is located in-between King Street and Queen Street.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Market Street, Melbourne</span> Street in Melbourne, Victoria

Market Street is one of the north–south streets in the central business district of Melbourne, Australia, part of the Hoddle Grid laid out in 1837.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Melbourne central business district</span> Suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

The Melbourne central business district is the city centre and main urban area of the city of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, centred on the Hoddle Grid, the oldest part of the city laid out in 1837, and includes its fringes. The Melbourne CBD is located in the local government area of the City of Melbourne which also includes some of inner suburbs adjoining the CBD.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Flinders Lane</span> Street in Melbourne

Flinders Lane is a minor street and thoroughfare in the central business district of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The laneway runs east–west from Spring Street to Spencer Street in-between Flinders and Collins Streets. Originally laid out as part of the Hoddle Grid in 1837, the laneway was once the centre of Melbourne's rag trade and is still home to boutique designers and high-end retailers including Chanel, now perched alongside numerous upscale hotels like the W Hotel Melbourne and Adelphi Hotel, loft apartments, cafes and bars.

Australian non-residential architectural styles are a set of Australian architectural styles that apply to buildings used for purposes other than residence and have been around only since the first colonial government buildings of early European settlement of Australia in 1788.

Knight & Kerr was a business partnership established in the 1850s between John George Knight and Peter Kerr. Their practice was important in the development of Melbourne as a city during the boom period led by the gold rush, providing the rapidly expanding state capital with many works of cultural and political significance. They were architects appointed with the responsibility for the design of noted public buildings in Melbourne, Australia; their most well known design being the Parliament House of Victoria. John Knight and Peter Kerr were also both members of The Royal British Institute of Architects.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lanes and arcades of Melbourne</span>

The Melbourne central business district in Australia is home to numerous lanes and arcades. Often called "laneways", these narrow streets and pedestrian paths date mostly from the Victorian era, and are a popular cultural attraction for their cafes, bars and street art.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Architecture of Melbourne</span>

The architecture of Melbourne, the capital of the state of Victoria and second most populous city in Australia, is characterised by a wide variety of styles dating from the early years of European settlement to the present day. The city is particularly noted for its mix of Victorian architecture and modern buildings, with 52 skyscrapers in the city centre, the most of any city in the Southern Hemisphere.

Melbourne, the capital of Victoria, Australia, was an important Victorian-era city and erected "some of the world's most majestic buildings" of the era. Several buildings survive from the period, including the State Library of Victoria (1856), Parliament House (1856), the General Post Office, the Royal Exhibition Building (1880), the Windsor Hotel (1884), the Block Arcade (1893), and the Rialto Building Group (1888–1891). However, many of the well-known architectural gems of Melbourne's Victorian central city were demolished in the 20th century. Some were lost in preparation for the 1956 Summer Olympics when Melbourne sought to reinvent itself as a modern, post-war city. Whelan's or Whelan the Wrecker was a well-known demolition company that was responsible for at least thirty of these demolitions, many at the instruction of the Melbourne City Council.

References

  1. "Melbourne city grid | Ergo". ergo.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 29 January 2017.
  2. "Melbourne's Streets & Lanes" (PDF). The Royal Historical Society of Victoria. Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 June 2016. Retrieved 28 April 2016.
  3. "About - Queen Victoria Market". Queen Victoria Market. Retrieved 29 January 2017.
  4. "Melbourne remembers Queen St massacre - Breaking News - National - Breaking News". www.smh.com.au. Retrieved 29 January 2017.
  5. Design, UBC Web. "Australian Post and Telecom Credit Union Victims Memorial | Monument Australia". monumentaustralia.org.au. Retrieved 29 January 2017.

See also

Australia road sign W5-29.svg   Australian Roadsportal