Roller Coaster DataBase

Last updated

Roller Coaster DataBase
RCDB logo.gif
Rcdb1.png
Roller Coaster DataBase logo and home page
Type of site
Database
Available in10 languages
OwnerDuane Marden
Website rcdb.com
Alexa rankDecrease2.svg 108,258 (As of March 19,2019) [1]
RegistrationNo
Launched1996
Current statusOperating

Roller Coaster DataBase (RCDB) is a roller coaster and amusement park database begun in 1996 by Duane Marden. [2] It has grown to feature statistics and photos of over 5000 roller coasters from around the world. [3]

Roller coaster Ride developed for amusement parks

A roller coaster is a type of amusement ride that employs a form of elevated railroad track designed with tight turns, steep slopes, and sometimes inversions. People ride along the track in open cars, and the rides are often found in amusement parks and theme parks around the world. LaMarcus Adna Thompson obtained one of the first known patents for a roller coaster design in 1885, related to the Switchback Railway that opened a year earlier at Coney Island. The track in a coaster design does not necessarily have to be a complete circuit, as shuttle roller coasters demonstrate. Most roller coasters have multiple cars in which passengers sit and are restrained. Two or more cars hooked together are called a train. Some roller coasters, notably Wild Mouse roller coasters, run with single cars.

Amusement park Park with rides and attractions

An amusement park is a park that features various attractions, such as rides and games, as well as other events for entertainment purposes. A theme park is a type of amusement park that bases its structures and attractions around a central theme, often featuring multiple areas with different themes. Unlike temporary and mobile funfairs and carnivals, amusement parks are stationary and built for long-lasting operation. They are more elaborate than city parks and playgrounds, usually providing attractions that cater to a variety of age groups. While amusement parks often contain themed areas, theme parks place a heavier focus with more intricately-designed themes that revolve around a particular subject or group of subjects.

Database organized collection of data

A database is an organized collection of data, generally stored and accessed electronically from a computer system. Where databases are more complex they are often developed using formal design and modeling techniques.

Contents

Publications that have mentioned RCDB include The New York Times , [3] Los Angeles Times , [4] Toledo Blade , [5] Orlando Sentinel , [6] Time , [7] Forbes , [8] Mail & Guardian , [9] and Chicago Sun-Times . [10]

<i>The New York Times</i> Daily broadsheet newspaper based in New York City

The New York Times is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership. Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S.

<i>Los Angeles Times</i> Daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California

The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California, since 1881. It has the fourth largest circulation among United States newspapers, and is the largest U.S. newspaper not headquartered on the East Coast. The paper is known for its coverage of issues particularly salient to the U.S. West Coast, such as immigration trends and natural disasters. It has won more than 40 Pulitzer Prizes for its coverage of these and other issues. As of June 18, 2018, ownership of the paper is controlled by Patrick Soon-Shiong, and the executive editor is Norman Pearlstine.

<i>Orlando Sentinel</i> newspaper

The Orlando Sentinel is the primary newspaper of Orlando, Florida, and the Central Florida region. It was founded in 1876 and is currently owned by Tribune Publishing Company.

History

RCDB was started in 1996 by Duane Marden, [2] a computer programmer from Brookfield, Wisconsin. [9] The website is run off web servers in Marden's basement and a location in St. Louis. [3]

Brookfield, Wisconsin City in Waukesha

Brookfield is a city located in Waukesha County, Wisconsin, United States in the Milwaukee metropolitan area. It had a population of 37,920 in the 2010 census. Brookfield is the third largest city in Waukesha County. The city is adjacent to the Town of Brookfield.

Web server server that serves website content to clients

A web server is server software, or hardware dedicated to running said software, that can satisfy World Wide Web client requests. A web server can, in general, contain one or more websites. A web server processes incoming network requests over HTTP and several other related protocols.

St. Louis independent city in Missouri, United States

St. Louis is a major independent city and inland port in the U.S. state of Missouri. It is the second largest city in the state of Missouri behind Kansas City. It is situated along the western bank of the Mississippi River, which forms the state line between Illinois and Missouri. The Missouri River merges with the Mississippi River 15 river miles north of Downtown St. Louis, forming the fourth-longest river system in the world. The estimated 2018 population of the city proper was 302,838 and the bi-state metropolitan area was 2,804,724. Greater St. Louis is the largest metropolitan area in Missouri, second-largest in Illinois, 7th-largest in the Great Lakes Megalopolis, and the 20th-largest in the United States.

Content

Each roller coaster entry includes any of the following information for the ride: current amusement park location, type, status (existing, standing but not operating (SBNO), defunct), opening date, make/model, cost, capacity, length, height, drop, number of inversions, speed, duration, maximum vertical angle, trains, and special notes. [11] Entries may also feature reader-contributed photos and/or press releases. [3]

Roller coaster inversion section of inverted track on a roller coaster

A roller coaster inversion is a roller coaster element in which the track turns riders upside-down and then returns them an upright position. Early forms of inversions, dating as far back as 1848 on the Centrifugal Railway in Paris, were vertical loops that were circular in nature. They produced massive g-force that was often dangerous to riders, and as a result, the element eventually became non-existent with the last rides to feature the looping inversions being dismantled during the Great Depression. In 1975, designers from Arrow Development created the corkscrew, reviving interest in the inversion during the modern age of steel roller coasters. Since then, the element have evolved from simple corkscrews and vertical loops to more complex inversions such Immelmann loops and cobra rolls. Featuring fourteen inversions, The Smiler at Alton Towers holds the world record for the number of inversions on a roller coaster.

Train (roller coaster) vehicle made up of two or more roller coaster cars

A roller coaster train is a vehicle made up of two or more cars connected by specialized joints which transports passengers around a roller coaster's circuit.

A press release, news release, media release, press statement or video release is an official statement delivered to members of the news media for the purpose of providing information, an official statement, or making an announcement. A press release is traditionally composed of nine structural elements. Press releases can be delivered to members of the media both physically and electronically.

The site also categorizes the rides into special orders, including a list of the tallest coasters, a list of the fastest coasters, a list of the most inversions on a coaster, a list of the parks with the most inversions, etc., each sortable by steel, wooden, or both. Each roller coaster entry links back to a page which lists all of that park's roller coasters, past and present, and includes a brief history and any links to fan web pages saluting the park. [11]

Languages

The site is available in ten languages: English, German, French, Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Swedish, Japanese and Simplified Chinese. [12] [11]

English language West Germanic language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and eventually became a global lingua franca. It is named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to the area of Great Britain that later took their name, as England. Both names derive from Anglia, a peninsula in the Baltic Sea. The language is closely related to Frisian and Low Saxon, and its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse, and to a greater extent by Latin and French.

German language West Germanic language

German is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol in Italy, the German-speaking Community of Belgium and Liechtenstein. It is one of the three official languages of Luxembourg and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship in Poland. The languages that are most similar to German are the other members of the West Germanic language branch, including Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. There are strong similarities in vocabulary with Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although those belong to the North Germanic group. German is the second most widely spoken Germanic language, after English.

French language Romance language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

Related Research Articles

Vekoma roller coaster and thrill ride designer

Vekoma Rides Manufacturing is a Dutch amusement ride manufacturer. Vekoma is an abbreviation of Veld Koning Machinefabriek and was established in 1926 by Hendrik op het Veld. They originally manufactured farm equipment and later made steel constructions for the coal mining industry in the 1950s, After the closure of Dutch mines in 1965, they manufactured steel pipes for the petrochemical industry. Since the 1970s, they have manufactured amusement rides. In 2018, Vekoma was acquired by Sansei Technologies, the parent company of american rides manufacture S&S Sansei

Steel roller coaster roller coaster that is defined by having a track made of steel

A steel roller coaster is a roller coaster that is defined by having a track made of steel. Steel coasters have earned immense popularity in the past 50 years throughout the world. Incorporating tubular steel track and polyurethane-coated wheels, the steel roller coasters can provide a taller, smoother, and faster ride with more inversions than a traditional wooden roller coaster.

The Riddlers Revenge Stand-up roller coaster at Six Flags Magic Mountain

The Riddler's Revenge is a stand-up roller coaster at Six Flags Magic Mountain. Manufactured by Bolliger & Mabillard, the ride opened on April 4, 1998 as the park's eleventh roller coaster, setting world records among stand-up coasters for height, speed, drop length, track length and number of inversions. The previous record holder was Chang at Kentucky Kingdom which opened a year earlier. Located in the Movie Town area of the park, The Riddler's Revenge was also the park's single biggest investment at a cost of $14 million. It stands 156 feet (48 m) tall and features a top speed of 65 miles per hour (105 km/h). The 4,370-foot-long (1,330 m) coaster also features six inversions and a ride duration of approximately three minutes.

Kumba (roller coaster) roller coaster

Kumba is a steel roller coaster located at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay in Tampa, Florida. Manufactured by Bolliger & Mabillard, the ride opened in 1993. It stands 143 feet (44 m) tall and has a top speed of 60 miles per hour (97 km/h). Kumba features a total of seven inversions across the 3-minute ride.

Boomerang (roller coaster) Steel roller coaster

Boomerang is a model of roller coaster manufactured and designed by Vekoma, a Dutch manufacturer. The roller coaster model name is from the hunting implement based on the traditions of the Indigenous Australians. As of October 2019 there are 55 Boomerangs operating.

<i>Superman: Ultimate Flight</i> Series of roller coasters at Six Flags parks

Superman: Ultimate Flight is a steel flying roller coaster designed by Bolliger & Mabillard. Themed to the popular comic book character, Superman: Ultimate Flight has been installed at three Six Flags theme parks around the United States: Six Flags Over Georgia, Six Flags Great Adventure and Six Flags Great America. Superman: Ultimate Flight simulates flying by positioning its passengers parallel to the track, supported by harnesses and facing the ground through most of the ride. In the station, riders board the train sitting down. After the train is locked and checked, the trains are raised into the flying position. After the ride, the seats are lowered back into the sitting position for the next round of riders.

<i>Kraken</i> (roller coaster) roller coaster

Kraken Unleashed is a steel floorless roller coaster located at SeaWorld Orlando in the United States. Manufactured by Bolliger & Mabillard, the ride features a total of seven inversions including two vertical loops, a dive loop, a spiraling camelback, a cobra roll, and a corkscrew. Kraken opened on June 1, 2000. It is also the world's second longest floorless coaster elongating up to 4,177 feet. The roller coaster has been refurbished and renamed to Kraken Unleashed with virtual reality. However as of 2018 fall season, the name Kraken Unleashed has remained, but the virtual reality experience is no longer available.

Steel Vengeance wooden roller coaster at Cedar Point

Steel Vengeance, formerly known as Mean Streak, is a steel roller coaster at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio. The roller coaster was manufactured by Rocky Mountain Construction (RMC) and opened to the public on May 5, 2018. It features RMC's patented I-Box Track technology utilizing a significant portion of Mean Streak's former support structure. Upon completion, Steel Vengeance set 10 world records.

Suspended Looping Coaster Type of roller coaster

The Suspended Looping Coaster is a model of steel inverted roller coaster built by Vekoma. There are at least 39 different installations across the world. The minimum rider height requirement is 130 centimetres.

T3 (roller coaster)

T3 is an inverted roller coaster at Kentucky Kingdom in Louisville, Kentucky. Previously named T2, the Suspended Looping Coaster model manufactured by Vekoma opened in 1995. The amusement park closed in 2010 due to financial difficulties, but later reopened under new ownership in 2014. The roller coaster was refurbished and renamed T3, which reopened to the public on July 3, 2015.

Suspended Family Coaster

A Suspended Family Coaster is a steel inverted roller coaster built by Vekoma designed for families with no inversions. Just like all inverted roller coasters the train runs under the track with the seats directly attached to the wheel carriage. This latter attribute is what sets it apart from the older suspended swinging coaster, which runs under the track, but "swings" via a pivoting bar attached to the wheel carriage.

Fabbri Group is an Italian amusement rides manufacturer based in Calto. They are known for producing a number staple attractions for both amusement parks and funfairs, such as the Booster and the Kamikaze.

This is a list of events and openings related to amusement parks that have occurred in 2012. These various lists are not exhaustive.

Outlaw Run amusement ride

Outlaw Run is a wooden roller coaster located at the Silver Dollar City amusement park in Branson, Missouri. The ride was the first wooden roller coaster manufactured by Rocky Mountain Construction and the first wooden roller coaster with multiple inversions, in which riders are turned upside-down and then back upright. The 2,937-foot-long (895 m) ride features three inversions and a top speed of 68 miles per hour (109 km/h), making Outlaw Run the sixth-fastest wooden roller coaster in the world. The 162-foot-tall (49 m) first drop of the ride is the fourth steepest in the world among wooden roller coasters, at 81° beyond horizontal.

This is a list of events and openings related to amusement parks that occurred in 2013. These various lists are not exhaustive.

Sky Scrapper roller coaster

Sky Scrapper is a flying roller coaster at World Joyland in Wujin, Changzhou, Jiangsu, China. Sky Scrapper was one of World Joyland's opening day attractions, officially opening on April 30, 2011. The 2,805.1-foot-long (855.0 m) ride stands 131.3 feet (40.0 m) tall, and features a top speed of 54.7 mph (88.0 km/h). Designed by Swiss firm Bolliger & Mabillard, Sky Scrapper restrains riders in the prone position and features five inversions.

Sansei Technologies, Inc. is a manufacturing firm based in Osaka, Japan. The company specialises in the manufacturing of amusement rides, stage equipment, and elevators.

This is a list of events and openings related to amusement parks that occurred in 2015. These various lists are not exhaustive.

Mine Blower roller coaster in Florida

Mine Blower is a hybrid wooden roller coaster located at Fun Spot America Kissimmee. Manufactured by The Gravity Group, the compact roller coaster is one of only three wooden roller coasters in Florida, the others being White Lightning at Fun Spot America Orlando and Coastersaurus at Legoland Florida. Unique points in the ride include a zero-gravity roll above the station area, and a 115° overbanked turn.

References

  1. "Rcdb.com Traffic, Demographics and Competitors - Alexa". Alexa Internet . Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "Faster coasters have reliability issues". USA Today . June 19, 2006. Retrieved April 8, 2010.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Cohen, Noam (October 3, 2010). "Obsessions With Minutiae Thrive as Databases". The New York Times. Retrieved December 1, 2012.
  4. MacDonald, Brady (October 25, 2012). "Looping wooden roller coasters are about to become a reality". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 1, 2012.
  5. "N.J. coaster gets raves, when it's working". Toledo Blade. June 18, 2006. Retrieved December 1, 2012.
  6. Bevil, Dewayne; Caviness, Tod (July 14, 2007). "A New Life For Old Coaster". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved December 1, 2012.
  7. Shum, Keane (September 19, 2005). "In The Loop". Time.
  8. LaMotta, Lisa (October 25, 2007). "The Most Blood-Curdling Coasters". Forbes.
  9. 1 2 "US's temperamental roller coasters". Mail & Guardian. June 17, 2006. Retrieved December 1, 2012.
  10. Moran, Dan (September 1, 2011). "New coaster coming to Gurnee Six Flags in 2012". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on March 23, 2012. Retrieved December 1, 2012.
  11. 1 2 3 Frederiksen, Linda (2007). "Roller Coaster Database". Reference Reviews. 21 (1): 51–55. doi:10.1108/09504120710719770. ISSN   0950-4125.
  12. Marden, Duane. "About This Site". Roller Coaster DataBase . Retrieved July 19, 2015.