Roman Catholic Diocese of Montepeloso

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The Diocese of Montepeloso (also Diocese of Irsina) (Latin: Dioecesis Montis Pelusii) was a Roman Catholic diocese located in the town of Montepeloso in the province of Matera in the Southern Italian region of Basilicata. It was united with the Diocese of Gravina (di Puglia) to form the Diocese of Gravina e Irsina (Montepeloso) in 1818. [1] [2]

Contents

History

Ordinaries

Diocese of Montepeloso

Latin Name: Montis Pelusii
Metropolitan: Archdiocese of Trani

27 June 1818: United with the Diocese of Gravina (di Puglia) to form the Diocese of Gravina e Irsina (Montepeloso)

See also

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Leonardo Carmini or Leonardo Corbera was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Trivento (1498–1502) and Bishop of Montepeloso (1491–1498).

Diego Merino, O. Carm. was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Isernia (1626–1637) and Bishop of Montepeloso (1623–1626).

Filippo Cesarini was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Nola (1674–1683) and Bishop of Montepeloso (1655–1674).

Lucio Maranta or Bishop Luca Maranta was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Montepeloso (1578–1592) and Bishop of Lavello (1561–1578).

Paolo de Cupis was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Recanati (1548–1553) and Bishop of Montepeloso (1546–1548).

Bishop Marco Copula, O.S.B. was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Montepeloso (1498–1527).

Ascanio Ferrari was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Montepeloso (1548–1550).

Gioia Dragomani was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Pienza (1599–1630) and Bishop of Montepeloso (1592–1596).

Vincenzo Ferrari was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Umbriatico (1578–1579) and Bishop of Montepeloso.

Giulio Ricci was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Teramo (1581–1592), Bishop of Gravina di Puglia (1575–1581), and Bishop of Muro Lucano (1572–1575).

References

  1. 1 2 "Diocese of Montepeloso" Catholic-Hierarchy.org . David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 23, 2016[ self-published source ]
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Diocese of Irsina" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. 1 2 3 4 Eubel, Konrad (1914). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. II (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana. pp. 195–196.(in Latin)
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Eubel, Konrad (1923). HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol III (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana. pp.  249.(in Latin)
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Gauchat, Patritius (Patrice) (1935). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. IV. Münster: Libraria Regensbergiana. pp. 247–248.(in Latin)
  6. Ritzler, Remigius; Sefrin, Pirminus. HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol V. p. 291.