Sam Simmonds (film editor)

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Sam Simmonds was a British film editor who worked on over thirty productions between 1927 and 1956. [1] For a number of years he worked for the Rank Organisation in various capacities.

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Selected filmography

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References

  1. "Sam Simmonds".