Sir John Hanmer, 3rd Baronet

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Sir John Hanmer, 3rd Baronet (died August 1701) [1] was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1659 and 1690.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Hanmer was the son of Sir Thomas Hanmer, 2nd Baronet of Hanmer and his first wife Elizabeth Baker. In 1659, he was elected Member of Parliament for Flint in the Third Protectorate Parliament. He was knighted on 9 August 1660 and was High Sheriff of Gloucestershire from 1664 to 1665, In October 1669 he was elected MP for Evesham for the Cavalier Parliament. He succeeded to the Baronetcy on the death of his father in 1678. In 1681 he was elected MP for Flintshire . He was elected MP for Flint again in 1685. He became a colonel of the 11th Foot in 1688. In 1689 he was elected MP for Flint again. He became a major-general in the Army and was colonel of the 11th Foot, serving King William III at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. [2]

Sir Thomas Hanmer, 2nd Baronet English politician

Sir Thomas Hanmer, 2nd Baronet (1612–1678) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1640 and from 1669 to 1678. He was a Royalist during the English Civil War and raised troops for Charles I. In his personal life he was a keen horticulturist. He is not to be confused with Sir Thomas Hanmer, 2nd Baronet (1747–1828) of the second creation.

Third Protectorate Parliament

The Third Protectorate Parliament sat for one session, from 27 January 1659 until 22 April 1659, with Chaloner Chute and Thomas Bampfylde as the Speakers of the House of Commons. It was a bicameral Parliament, with an Upper House having a power of veto over the Commons.

This is a list of Sheriffs and High Sheriffs of Gloucestershire, who should not be confused with the sheriffs of the City of Gloucester.

Hanmer married Mary Alston, daughter of Joseph Alston, of Netherhall, Suffolk. He died in 1701, probably killed in a duel [3] and left no issue; he was succeeded in the baronetcy by his nephew Thomas, the son of his younger brother William who had already predeceased their father, the 2nd Baronet. [2] [4]

Sir Thomas Hanmer, 4th Baronet 4th Baronet Hanmer, Speaker of the House of Commons, and Shakespearean editor

Sir Thomas Hanmer, 4th Baronet was Speaker of the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1714 to 1715, discharging the duties of the office with conspicuous impartiality. His second marriage was the subject of much gossip as his wife eloped with his cousin Thomas Hervey and lived openly with him for the rest of her days. He is, however, perhaps best remembered as being one of the early editors of the works of William Shakespeare.

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Thomas Hanmer may refer to:

Hanmer baronets

There have been two baronetcies created for members of the Hanmer family of Flintshire, Wales, one in the Baronetage of England and one in the Baronetage of Great Britain. Only one creation is extant as of 2008. The third Baronet of the second creation was elevated to the peerage as Baron Hanmer in 1872, a title which became extinct in 1881. The family name derived from the manor of Hanmer in the parish of St. Asaph.

Bunbury baronets

The Bunbury Baronetcy, of Bunbury, Oxon and Stanney Hall in the County of Chester, is a title in the Baronetage of England. It was created on 29 June 1681 for Thomas Bunbury, Sheriff of Cheshire from 1673 to 1674 and the member of an ancient Cheshire family. His grandson, Henry, the third Baronet, and great-grandson, the fourth Baronet, both sat as Members of Parliament for Chester. The latter died unmarried at an early age and was succeeded by his younger brother, the fifth Baronet. He was a clergyman. On his death in 1764 the title passed to his eldest son, the sixth Baronet. He represented Suffolk in the House of Commons for over forty years but is best remembered for his marriage to Lady Sarah Lennox. He died childless in 1821 and was succeeded by his nephew, the seventh Baronet. He was the son of Henry Bunbury, younger son of the fifth Baronet. The seventh Baronet was a distinguished soldier and politician. His eldest son, the eighth Baronet, was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1868. He died childless in 1886 and was succeeded by his younger brother, the ninth Baronet. He was Liberal Member of Parliament for Bury St Edmunds. He died unmarried in 1895 and was succeeded by his nephew, the tenth Baronet. He was the son of Colonel Henry William St Pierre Bunbury, third son of the seventh Baronet. He served as High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1908 and was a Deputy Lieutenant of the county. On his death in 1930 the title passed to his son, the eleventh Baronet. He was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1936 and was a Deputy Lieutenant of the county. His son, the twelfth Baronet, was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1972. As of 2014 the title is held by the latter's second but eldest surviving son, the thirteenth Baronet, who succeeded in 1985.

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Sir Henry Bunbury, 3rd Baronet of Stanney Hall, Cheshire was a British Tory politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons for 27 years from 1700 to 1727. At the time of the Hanoverian Succession in 1714 he was a Hanoverian Tory, but later offered support to the Jacobites.

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Mostyn baronets Welsh family, of Talacre, Flintshire

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Sir Job Charlton, 1st Baronet KS was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1659 and 1679. He was Speaker of the House of Commons of England briefly in 1673.

Sir Roger Mostyn, 3rd Baronet, of Mostyn Hall, Holywell, Flintshire, was a Welsh Tory politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons for 25 years from 1701 to 1735.

John Hanmer, 1st Baron Hanmer, known as Sir John Hanmer, Bt, between 1828 and 1872, was a British politician.

Sir John Hanmer, 1st Baronet Member of Parliament of England

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Sir Hugh Pollard, 2nd Baronet English soldier and member of parliament

Sir Hugh Pollard, 2nd Baronet was an English soldier and MP elected for Bere Alston in 1640, Callington in 1660, and Devon in 1661. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

Sir Roger Mostyn, 5th Baronet was a Welsh landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons for 38 years from 1758 to 1796.

Sir John Conway, 2nd Baronet English Member of Parliament (died 1721)

Sir John Conway, 2nd Baronet of Bodrhyddan Hall, Rhuddlan, Denbighshire was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1685 and 1721.

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Sir Thomas Mostyn, 6th Baronet British MP (1776-1831)

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This article is about the particular significance of the year 1701 to Wales and its people.

References

  1. John Hanmer (1st baron) (1876). A Memorial of the Parish and Family of Hanmer in Flintshire ... priv. Press at the Chiswick Press. p. 180.
  2. 1 2 George E. Cokayne Complete Baronetage, Vol. 1 (1900)
  3. Dodd, Arthur Herbert. Hanmer family. Dictionary of Welsh Biography, online edition. Retrieved 22 December 2015.
  4. Bunbury, Henry Edward, ed. (1838). The correspondence of Sir Thomas Hanmer ... with a memoir of his life, to which are added, other relicks of a gentleman's family. London: Edward Moxon. pp. 4–5. [Bunbury was Thos. Hanmer's brother-in-law.]
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Not represented in Second Protectorate Parliament
Member of Parliament for Flint
1659
Succeeded by
Not represented in Restored Rump
Preceded by
William Sandys
Abraham Cullen
Member of Parliament for Evesham
1669–1679
With: William Sandys 1669–1670
Sir James Rushout 1670–1679
Succeeded by
Sir James Rushout
Henry Parker
Preceded by
Mutton Davies
Member of Parliament for Flintshire
1681–1685
Succeeded by
Sir John Conway
Preceded by
Thomas Whitley
Member of Parliament for Flint
1685–1690
Succeeded by
Thomas Whitley
Parliament of Ireland
Preceded by
Elnathan Lum
Zaccheus Sedgwick
Member of Parliament for Carlingford
1695–1699
With: Zaccheus Sedgwick 1695
Elnathan Lum 1695–1699
Succeeded by
Charles Dering
Arthur Hill
Military offices
Preceded by
Viscount Montgomery
Colonel of Hanmer's Regiment of Foot
1688–1701
Succeeded by
James Stanhope
Honorary titles
Preceded by
William Cooke
High Sheriff of Gloucestershire
1665
Succeeded by
Sir Richard Cocks
Baronetage of England
Preceded by
Thomas Hanmer
Baronet
(of Hanmer)
1678–1701
Succeeded by
Thomas Hanmer