Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives

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Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives
Seal of the Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives.png
Seal of the Speaker
Tim Moore 2017 portrait.jpg
Incumbent
Tim Moore

since 2015
TypeSpeaker
Formation1666
First holderGeorge Catchmaid

The Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives is the presiding officer of one of the houses of the North Carolina General Assembly. The Speaker is elected by the members of the house when they first convene for their regular session, which is currently in January of each odd-numbered year. Perhaps the most important duty of the Speaker is to appoint members and chairs of the various standing committees of the House.

Contents

The office evolved from the office of Speaker of the lower house of the legislature in the Province of Carolina, called the House of Burgesses. Since the House was the only elected body in the colony, the Speaker was often seen as the leading voice of the people. In 1776, North Carolina created its first constitution, which established a Senate and a House of Commons, both of which were elected by voters. In the 1868 North Carolina Constitution, the name of the house was changed to "House of Representatives." [1]

For most of the twentieth century, the office's power was limited, because Speakers usually only served for a single legislative session. This changed with Speakers Carl J. Stewart, Jr. (1977–1980), Liston B. Ramsey (1981–1988) and James B. Black (1999–2006).

Democrats held the speaker's chair continuously from 1899 until 1994, when Republicans gained a majority and elected Harold J. Brubaker in January 1995.

In the 2003–2004 session, a unique power-sharing arrangement was created by Democrats and a handful of Republicans. This resulted in the first election of two speakers simultaneously, Jim Black (Democrat) and Richard T. Morgan (Republican). The two held roughly equal power and took turns presiding over the House. After Democrats won a majority in the 2004 election, this arrangement was ended, but Morgan again supported Black and was named Speaker Pro Tempore .

List of speakers

Speakers of the House of Burgesses

The following were speakers of the House of Burgesses during the Province of Carolina and Province of North Carolina periods: [house 1]

Speakers of the House of Commons

Abner Nash, 1st Speaker of the House of Commons, 1777 AbnerNash.jpg
Abner Nash, 1st Speaker of the House of Commons, 1777
Speaker Richar Dobbs Spaight, 1785 NCG-RichardSpaight.jpg
Speaker Richar Dobbs Spaight, 1785

The following members were elected speakers of the House of Commons in the state of North Carolina: [2] [3] [4] [5]

Speakers of the House of Representatives

The following members were elected speaker of the House of Representatives: [3] [2] [12]

House notes

  1. Note that some sources refer to the lower House as the House of Commons before the Revolution as well as afterward.
  2. Marmaduke Swain Robins was elected on November 24, 1863 when illness kept Richard Spaight Donnell from that session. See Cheney, page 356, footnote 580.
  3. William E. Mann served for a brief period as Speaker in the January adjourned session when Richard Donnell was ill.
  4. 1 2 Joseph Holden resigned in the middle of the 1869–1870 session and W. A. Moore was elected to succeed him, according to the North Carolina Manual of 1913.
  5. John R. Webster was elected by the coalition of Independents and Republicans in the House, according to the New York Times and J. G. de R. Hamilton.
  6. 1 2 George Whitfield Connor resigned after the January 8 – March 12, 1913 session. Walter Murphy served as speaker during the "extra" session that began September 24, 1913, according to the North Carolina Manual of 1913.

See also

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The North Carolina General Assembly of 1782 was the state legislature that first convened in Hillsborough, North Carolina, on April 15, 1782, and concluded on May 18, 1782. Members of the North Carolina Senate and the North Carolina House of Commons were elected by eligible North Carolina voters.

The North Carolina General Assembly of 1783 was the state legislature that convened in Hillsboro, North Carolina from April 18, 1783, to May 17, 1783. Members of the North Carolina Senate and the North Carolina House of Commons were elected by eligible North Carolina voters. This was the last assembly to meet during the American Revolution. Much of their time was devoted to taking care of the North Carolina soldiers that fought in the war.

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Third North Carolina Provincial Congress

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The Second North Carolina Provincial Congress was the second extra-legal unicameral body of the North Carolina Provincial Congress that met beginning in 1774. They were modeled after the colonial lower house. These congresses created a government structure, issued bills of credit to pay for the movement, and organized an army for defense, in preparation for the state of North Carolina. These congresses paved the way for the first meeting of the North Carolina General Assembly on April 7, 1777 in New Bern, North Carolina. The second Congress met in New Bern from April 3 to April 7, 1775.

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North Carolina General Assembly of 1868–1869

The North Carolina General Assembly of 1868–1869 met in Raleigh from November 16, 1868 to April 12, 1869 with a special session from July 1, 1868 to August 24, 1868. This was the first assembly to meet after the approval of the new Constitution of North Carolina in 1868. As prescribed in this constitution, the assembly consisted of the 120 members in the North Carolina House of Representatives and 43 senators in the North Carolina Senate elected by the voters on August 6, 1868. This assembly was in control of the Republican Party and was dominated by reconstruction era politics.

The North Carolina General Assembly of 1862–1864 met in Raleigh from November 17, 1862 to December 22, 1862. Extra sessions were held on January 19, 1863–February 12, 1863; June 30, 1863–July 7, 1863; November 23, 1863–December 14, 1863; and May 17–30 1864. The assembly consisted of the 120 members of the North Carolina House of Commons from 82 counties and 50 senators representing one or more counties in North Carolina Senate elected by the voters in October 1862. Zebulon Baird Vance was Governor of North Carolina during this assembly. This assembly met during the American Civil War as part of the Confederate States of America. Much of the legislation passed by this assembly dealt with the managing the state and its population during wartime.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Cheney, John L. Jr. (1974). North Carolina Government, 1585–1974 . Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  2. 1 2 Connor, R.D.D. (1913). A Manual of North Carolina (PDF). Raleigh: North Carolina Historical Commission. p. 453-. Retrieved April 27, 2019., Alternate link
  3. 1 2 Wheeler, John H. (1874). "The Legislative Manual and Political Register of the State of North Carolina" . Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  4. "Session Laws: North Carolina". HeinOnline . New York: William S. Hein & Co., Inc. Retrieved March 22, 2019.(subscription required)
  5. Lewis, J.D. "NC Revolution State House 1780". The American Revolution in North Carolina. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  6. Littleton, Tucker Reed (1994). "Edward Starkey". NCPEDIA. Retrieved November 30, 2019.
  7. 1 2 Smith, Claiborne T., Jr. (1991). "John Leigh". NCPEDIA. Retrieved November 30, 2019.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  8. Mcarver, Charles H., Jr. (1991). "William Miller". NCPEDIA. Retrieved November 30, 2019.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  9. Kirkman, Roger N. (1991). "James Mebane". NCPEDIA. Retrieved November 30, 2019.
  10. 1 2 Kirkman, Roger N. (1979). "William Julius Alexander". NCPEDIA. Retrieved November 30, 2019.
  11. Alexander, Roberta Sue (1991). "Rufus Yancey McAden". NCPEDIA. Retrieved November 2019.{{cite web}}: Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  12. "North Carolina General Assembly". Ballotpedia.org . Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  13. Bell, John L., Jr. (1991). "William Armistead Moore". NCPEDIA. Retrieved November 30, 2019.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)