Split album

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A split album (or split) is a music album that includes tracks by two or more separate artists. There have been singles and EPs of the same variety, which are often called "split singles" and "split EPs" respectively. Split albums differ from "various artists" compilation albums in that they generally include several tracks of each artist, or few artists with one or two tracks each, instead of multiple artists with only one or two tracks each.

History

Splits were initially done on vinyl records, with music from one artist on one side of the record and music from a second artist on the opposite side. As vinyl albums declined as a mass medium, CDs issues have followed the practice. Although a CD is not turned over the same way as a vinyl, the term "sides" is still applied figuratively.[ vague ] Since the early 1980s, the format has been used widely by independent record labels, and artists in punk rock, hardcore, grindcore, black metal, noise and indie rock circles. [1] Splits usually receive an underground fanbase even if the artists featured are mainstream, as the success of split albums is most often not of a mainstream proportion.

A recent trend is using the same philosophy for getting live shows for emerging music artists. A "split gig" is a show with two artists, one guest and one host.

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References

  1. Finn, Craig. (2011-10-27). "The Faith and Void: the glorious Dischord of 1980s harDCore punk". The Guardian . Archived from the original on 2012-02-13. Retrieved 2012-01-23.