Teesra

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The Teesra, also known as the Jalebi , is a particular type of delivery by an off-spin bowler in the sport of cricket, which renowned off-spinner Saqlain Mushtaq said he had invented. However, upon closer inspection, the ball is simply an orthodox backspinner, a very common delivery that has been bowled by finger spinners as long as cricket has been played. [1]

Contents

The delivery was renamed in the Indian Cricket League by Saqlain Mushtaq. At that time Saqlain played for the Lahore Badshahs. The first person to face the teesra or jalebi was Russel Arnold of Sri Lanka when he was correctly given LBW by the umpire. He was also the first person to get out at the hands of the teesra. He got out the fourth time a teesra had ever been bowled. [2]

The teesra made the news in the build-up to the first Test between England and Pakistan in 2012, when Saeed Ajmal claimed he would introduce the delivery into his repertoire. Saeed Ajmal took a match haul of 10 for 97 and became the fifth bowler to pick up seven leg before wicket dismissals in a match. [3]

The delivery

The delivery is similar to a slider (which is used by a wrist spinner). The ball is held by an off-spinner in his normal action but instead of twisting the arm at the point of the delivery, the bowler simply does not roll his fingers down the back of the ball. The delivery looks like it will turn a lot but it doesn't turn at all. This is a good way of deceiving the batsman.

The name

The name teesra is commonly used by Saqlain Mushtaq. It originated from an older delivery, the doosra which meant the "other one" or "second one" in Hindi, and Urdu, Saqlain decided to call it the teesra meaning the "third one". The name jalebi was introduced by commentators as soon as the delivery was bowled. A jalebi is a sweet commonly eaten in Indian subcontinent. However the name "backspinner" is by far the more common name that describes accurately the spin on the ball as it travels through the air.

Usage

So far this delivery has been used for well over a hundred years, but Saqlain has stated that the teesra is still a work in progress and that he wants to hone the delivery so that the batsman become even more confused about where the ball is going to spin to and whether it will spin at all. Saeed Ajmal claimed to have learned this art and has used it occasionally in the 2011 World Cup and after.

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Finger spin is a type of bowling in the sport of cricket. It refers to the cricket technique and specific hand movements associated with imparting a particular direction of spin to the cricket ball. The other spinning technique, generally used to spin the ball in the opposite direction, is wrist spin. Although there are exceptions, finger spinners generally turn the ball less than wrist spinners. However, because the technique is simpler and easier to master, finger spinners tend to be more accurate.

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In cricket, a slider is a type of delivery bowled by a wrist spin bowler. While a topspinner is released with the thumb facing the batsman, a slider is bowled in a similar manner to a legbreak, but instead of imparting sidespin with the third finger, the bowler allows his fingers to roll down the back of the ball, providing a mixture of sidespin and backspin. Whereas a topspinner tends to dip more quickly and bounce higher than a normal delivery, a slider does the opposite: it carries to a fuller length and bounces less than the batsman might expect. The sliders will typically head towards the batsman with a scrambled seam. This has less effect on the flight and bounce but absence of leg spin may deceive the batsman. Frequently the slider is bowled with a mixture of side spin and backspin. This has the effect of making the ball harder to differentiate from the leg break for the batsmen without reducing the mechanical effects caused by the backspin. This delivery may skid straight on or it may turn a small amount.

The carrom ball is a style of spin bowling delivery used in cricket. The ball is released by flicking it between the thumb and a bent middle finger in order to impart spin. Though the delivery was first brought in use in early 1940s, it was re-introduced by Ajantha Mendis in 2008 as well as by Indian spinner Ravichandran Ashwin later. Varun Chakravarthy is among the newer players to use it.

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References

  1. [Brian Wilkins "The Bowler's Art"]
  2. Arnold adjudged Plumb to miraculous Teesra by Saqi
  3. "Ajmal's ten, and Misbah's impressive start to captaincy" . Retrieved 21 January 2012.