Yorker

Last updated

In cricket, a yorker is a ball bowled (a delivery) which hits the cricket pitch around the batsman's feet. When a batsman assumes a normal stance, this generally means that the cricket ball bounces on the cricket pitch on or near the batsman's popping crease. A batsman who advances down the pitch to strike the ball (typically to slower or spin bowlers) may by so advancing cause the ball to pitch (or land) at or around his feet and may thus cause himself to be "yorked". [1] Yorkers are considered to be one of the most difficult deliveries to bowl for the bowlers. [2]

Contents

Origin of the term

The Oxford English Dictionary gives the derivation of the term as originating in Yorkshire, a notable English cricketing county. [3]

According to Oxford dictionaries, the term was coined because players from York bowled these deliveries. Another theory attributes the name to the other meaning of yorker which is a cheater. [4] However, other derivations have been suggested. The term may derive from the 18th and 19th century slang term "to pull Yorkshire" on a person meaning to trick or deceive them, [5] although there is evidence to suggest that the Middle English word yuerke (meaning to trick or deceive) may have been the source.

Play

A batsman who has been beaten by a yorker is said to have been yorked. "Beaten" in this context does not mean that the batsman is bowled or given out lbw but can include the batsman missing the ball with the bat. A delivery which is intended to be a yorker but which does not york the batsman is known as an attempted yorker.

A batsman in his normal stance will raise his bat (backlift) as the bowler bowls which can make the yorker difficult to play when it arrives at the batsman's feet. A batsman may only realise very late that the delivery is of yorker length and will jam his bat down to "dig out" the yorker. [6]

Use

Yorkers are very difficult to play. Here a batsman defends against one in the nets. Defend yorker.jpg
Yorkers are very difficult to play. Here a batsman defends against one in the nets.

A yorker is a difficult delivery to bowl as a mistimed delivery can either result in a full toss or half-volley which can easily be played by the batsman. Bowling yorkers is a tactic used most often by fast bowlers. A fast yorker is one of the most difficult types of delivery in cricket to play successfully, as the bat must be swung down right to the pitch to intercept the ball—if any gap remains between the bat and the pitch, the ball can squeeze through and potentially go on to hit the wicket. The yorker might miss the bat but hit the pads in front of the wicket, resulting in the batsman getting out lbw. When the batsman blocks such a ball, it is referred to as "dug out". A bowler who achieves swing when bowling yorkers can be even more dangerous, as the ball will deviate sideways as it travels towards the batsman, making it even harder to hit.

Yorkers can also be aimed directly at the batsman's feet, forcing the batsman to shift his feet while attempting to play the ball, or risk being hit. Inswinging yorkers have a reputation for being particularly hard to defend and difficult to score runs off. Such a delivery is colloquially known as a sandshoe crusher, toe crusher, [7] cobbler's delight or nail breaker. A recent variation is the wide yorker, which is delivered wide of the batsman on the off side. This is particularly useful in Twenty20 cricket as a ploy to restrict runs rather than to get the batsman out. [8]

Despite the effectiveness of yorkers, they are notoriously difficult to bowl correctly and usually will be attempted only a handful of times during a sequence of several overs. Yorkers are best used to surprise a batsman who has become accustomed to hitting shorter-pitched balls and not with the bat speed necessary to defend against a yorker. As such, a yorker is frequently bowled quickly to give the batsman less time to react and position his bat.

The yorker is regarded as particularly effective against weak tail-end batsmen, who often lack the skill to defend even a non-swinging yorker and who are sometimes less susceptible to other bowling tactics. It is also particularly effective in the later stages of an innings in one-day cricket, because it is the most difficult of all deliveries to score off even if defended successfully. Runs will often only be scored off edges or straight down the ground.

The most notable bowlers in delivering yorkers are Pakistanis Waqar Younis, Wasim Akram, and Shoaib Akhtar, Sri Lankan Lasith Malinga, Australians Brett Lee, Mitchell Starc, Pat Cummins and Mitchell Johnson, New Zealanders Trent Boult, Shane Bond and Tim Southee, South Africans Dale Steyn and Alan Donald, West Indians Patrick Patterson, Malcolm Marshall, Courtney Walsh, Curtly Ambrose and Jerome Taylor, Indians Zaheer Khan, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Jasprit Bumrah, T. Natarajan and Englishmen Andrew Flintoff and Chris Jordan.

Lengths of balls showing name and bounce height. Angles are exaggerated. Cricket delivery lengths en.svg
Lengths of balls showing name and bounce height. Angles are exaggerated.

Bowling a yorker

A yorker is usually delivered very late in the bowling action with the hand pointing almost vertically. The aim is both to get more pace and to deliver it later so as to deceive the batsman in flight. It is usually recommended to deliver the ball with some inswing but an away-swinging yorker aimed at the pads can be just as effective. Because yorkers are quite difficult to bowl they require substantial practice in order to achieve consistent success. [9]

Related Research Articles

In the game of cricket, a googly refers to a type of delivery bowled by a right-arm leg spin bowler. The googly is a variation of the typical leg spin type of delivery, in that the cricket ball is presented from the bowler's hand in such a way that once the ball pitches, it deviates in the opposite direction of a leg spinning type of delivery. It has also been colloquially and affectionately referred to as the wrong'un, Bosie or Bosey, with those latter two eponyms referring to Bernard Bosanquet, the bowler who initially discovered and began using the googly.

Bowling (cricket) Cricket delivery

Bowling, in cricket, is the action of propelling the ball toward the wicket defended by a batter. A player skilled at bowling is called a bowler; a bowler who is also a competent batter is known as an all-rounder. Bowling the ball is distinguished from throwing the ball by a strictly specified biomechanical definition, which restricts the angle of extension of the elbow. A single act of bowling the ball towards the batsman is called a ball or a delivery. Bowlers bowl deliveries in sets of six, called an over. Once a bowler has bowled an over, a teammate will bowl an over from the other end of the pitch. The Laws of Cricket govern how a ball must be bowled. If a ball is bowled illegally, an umpire will rule it a no-ball. If a ball is bowled too wide of the striker for the batsman to be able to play at it with a proper cricket shot, the bowler's end umpire will rule it a wide.

Fielding (cricket)

Fielding in the sport of cricket is the action of fielders in collecting the ball after it is struck by the batsman, to limit the number of runs that the batsman scores and/or to get the batsman out by catching the ball in flight or by running the batsman out. There are a number of recognised fielding positions, and they can be categorised into the offside and leg side of the field. Fielding generally involves preventing the ball from going to or over the edge of the field, and getting the ball to either wicket as quickly as possible.

A topspinner is a type of delivery bowled by a cricketer bowling either wrist spin or finger spin. In either case, the bowler imparts the ball with top spin by twisting it with his or her fingers prior to delivery. In both cases, the topspinner is the halfway house between the stock delivery and the wrong'un - in the wrist spinner's case his googly, and in the finger spinner's case his doosra.

Leg before wicket Cricket rule

Leg before wicket (lbw) is one of the ways in which a batsman can be dismissed in the sport of cricket. Following an appeal by the fielding side, the umpire may rule a batter out lbw if the ball would have struck the wicket, but was instead intercepted by any part of the batter's body. The umpire's decision will depend on a number of criteria, including where the ball pitched, whether the ball hit in line with the wickets, and whether the batter was attempting to hit the ball.

In cricket, underarm bowling is as old as the sport itself. Until the introduction of the roundarm style in the first half of the 19th century, bowling was performed in the same way as in bowls, the ball being delivered with the hand below the waist. Bowls may well be an older game than cricket and it is possible that cricket was derived from bowls by the intervention of a batsman trying to stop the ball reaching its target by hitting it away, though bowling per se continued as in bowls.

Wicket One of the two sets of three stumps and two bails at either end of a cricket pitch

In cricket, the term wicket has several meanings:

Glossary of cricket terms

This is a general glossary of the terminology used in the sport of cricket. Where words in a sentence are also defined elsewhere in this article, they appear in italics. Certain aspects of cricket terminology are explained in more detail in cricket statistics and the naming of fielding positions is explained at fielding (cricket).

In the sport of cricket, a bouncer is a type of short-pitched delivery, usually bowled by a fast bowler, which bounces once and then reaches the batsman at head-height.

In the sport of cricket, the crease is a certain area demarcated by white lines painted or chalked on the field of play, and pursuant to the rules of cricket they help determine legal play in different ways for the fielding and batting side. They define the area within which the batsmen and bowlers operate. The term crease may refer to any of the lines themselves, particularly the popping crease, or to the region that they demark. Law 7 of the Laws of Cricket governs the size and position of the crease markings, and defines the actual line as the back edge of the width of the marked line on the grass, i.e., the edge nearest to the wicket at that end.

Fast bowling Bowling technique in cricket

Pace bowling is one of two main approaches to bowling in the sport of cricket, the other being spin bowling. Practitioners of pace bowling are usually known as fast bowlers, quicks, or pacemen. They can also be referred to as a seam bowler, a swing bowler or a fast bowler who can swing it to reflect the predominant characteristic of their deliveries. Strictly speaking, a pure swing bowler does not need to have a high degree of pace, though dedicated medium-pace swing bowlers are rarely seen at Test level these days.

Spin bowling Bowling technique in cricket

Spin bowling is a bowling technique in cricket, in which the ball is delivered slowly but with the potential to deviate sharply after bouncing, and the bowler is referred to as a spinner.

An arm ball is a type of delivery in cricket. It is a variation delivery bowled by an off spin bowler or slow left-arm orthodox bowler. It is the finger spin equivalent of a wrist spinner's slider or zooter.

An outswinger is a type of delivery in the sport of cricket. It is bowled by swing bowlers.

An inswinger is a type of delivery in the sport of cricket. It is bowled by swing bowlers.

Extra (cricket) Cricket term

In cricket, an extra is a run scored by, or awarded to, a batting team which is not credited to any individual batsman. They are the runs scored by methods other than striking the ball with the bat.

Delivery (cricket) Single action of bowling a cricket ball

A delivery or ball in cricket is a single action of bowling a cricket ball toward the batsman. These terms can also refer to the events that occur after the ball is bowled while the ball is not dead.

Wrist spin Type of spin bowling in cricket

Wrist spin is a type of bowling in the sport of cricket. It refers to the cricket technique and specific hand movements associated with imparting a particular direction of spin to the cricket ball. The other spinning technique, usually used to spin the ball in the opposite direction, is finger spin. Wrist spin is bowled by releasing the ball from the back of the hand, so that it passes over the little finger. Done by a right-handed bowler, this imparts an anticlockwise rotation to the ball, as seen from the bowler's perspective; a left-handed wrist spinner rotates the ball clockwise.

Finger spin is a type of bowling in the sport of cricket. It refers to the cricket technique and specific hand movements associated with imparting a particular direction of spin to the cricket ball. The other spinning technique, generally used to spin the ball in the opposite direction, is wrist spin. Although there are exceptions, finger spinners generally turn the ball less than wrist spinners. However, because the technique is simpler and easier to master, finger spinners tend to be more accurate.

Jasprit Jasbirsingh Bumrah is an Indian international cricketer, who plays for the Indian national cricket team in all formats of the game.A right arm fast bowler, he consistently bowls at around 145-150 kph. After a couple of moderately successful seasons with the Mumbai Indians at the Indian Premier League, and with his domestic team Gujarat, he was named in India's squad for its 2015–16 series against Australia, as a replacement to an injured Mohammed Shami.

References

  1. Smyth, Rob (20 May 2011). "Shane Warne's last game: Mumbai v Rajasthan – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  2. "What is a 'Yorker'? Why is it an unplayable delivery for batsmen?". CricketAddictor. Retrieved 18 October 2020.
  3. Shorter Oxford English dictionary. United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. 2007. p. 3804. ISBN   0199206872.
  4. "The origins of cricket jargon". BBC Bitesize.
  5. "The origins of cricket jargon". BBC Bitesize. Retrieved 17 November 2018.
  6. "Delivering the yorker with deadly accuracy". Deccan Herald. 5 July 2019. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  7. "'You can't master it': Jasprit Bumrah on his toe-crushing yorkers". mint. 3 July 2019. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  8. "The Wide Yorker". The Ultimate Cricketer. Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  9. "To york or not to york in T20?". Cricinfo. 7 May 2018. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  1. How did the term 'yorker' originate - ESPNcricinfo
  2. How to bowl a yorker in cricket - wisdomtalkes
  3. How to bowl a yorker - pitchvision