Thanks for Nothing (Rosemary Clooney album)

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Thanks for Nothing
Rosenoth.jpg
Studio album by Rosemary Clooney
Released 1964
Recorded 1964
Genre Vocal jazz
Label Reprise
Producer Sonny Burke
Rosemary Clooney chronology
Love
(1963) Love 1963
Thanks for Nothing
(1964)
That Travelin' Two-Beat
(1965) That Travelin' Two-Beat1965
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [1]

Thanks for Nothing is a 1964 studio album by American jazz singer Rosemary Clooney.

Rosemary Clooney singer and actress from the United States

Rosemary Clooney was an American singer and actress. She came to prominence in the early 1950s with the song "Come On-a My House", which was followed by other pop numbers such as "Botch-a-Me", "Mambo Italiano", "Tenderly", "Half as Much", "Hey There" and "This Ole House". She also had success as a jazz vocalist. Clooney's career languished in the 1960s, partly due to problems related to depression and drug addiction, but revived in 1977, when her White Christmas co-star Bing Crosby asked her to appear with him at a show marking his 50th anniversary in show business. She continued recording until her death in 2002.

Contents

As the sole album that Clooney recorded for Reprise Records, Thanks for Nothing would mark Clooney's last solo studio work until 1976's Look My Way . [2]

<i>Look My Way</i> (Rosemary Clooney album) album by Rosemary Clooney

Look My Way was a 1976 studio album by Rosemary Clooney. The songs include a number of country tracks, and a remake of her early hit "Half as Much".

Track listing

  1. "Hello Faithless" (Felice and Boudleaux Bryant) – 2:19
  2. "The Rules of the Road" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) – 2:34
  3. "Just One of Those Things" (Cole Porter) – 2:32
  4. "All Alone" (Irving Berlin) – 2:27
  5. "Black Coffee" (Sonny Burke, Paul Francis Webster) – 3:43
  6. "A Good Man Is Hard to Find" (Eddie Green) – 2:28
  7. "Baby, the Ball Is Over" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith, Lew Spence) – 2:11
  8. "The Man That Got Away" (Harold Arlen, Ira Gershwin) – 4:16
  9. "I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues" (Arlen, Ted Koehler) – 3:16
  10. "Miss Otis Regrets" (Porter) – 3:03
  11. "Thanks for Nothing (At All)" (Jerry Gladstone, John Rotella) – 3:06
  12. "Careless Love" (W.C. Handy, Martha E. Koenig, Spencer Williams) – 2:07

Personnel

Performance

Singing act of producing musical sounds with the voice

Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques. A person who sings is called a singer or vocalist. Singers perform music that can be sung with or without accompaniment by musical instruments. Singing is often done in an ensemble of musicians, such as a choir of singers or a band of instrumentalists. Singers may perform as soloists or accompanied by anything from a single instrument up to a symphony orchestra or big band. Different singing styles include art music such as opera and Chinese opera, Indian music and religious music styles such as gospel, traditional music styles, world music, jazz, blues, gazal and popular music styles such as pop, rock, electronic dance music and filmi.

Bob Thompson (musician) American musician

Robert Lamar Thompson was a composer, arranger, and orchestra leader from the 1950s through the 1980s. Active in Los Angeles, Thompson was a recording artist for RCA Victor and Dot Records, scored film and television soundtracks, and wrote musical accompaniments for commercials. He composed, arranged, and conducted orchestra for such artists as Rosemary Clooney, Mae West, Julie London, Bing Crosby, The Andrews Sisters, Duane Eddy, Judy Garland, Jerry Lewis, and Phil Ochs. In an interview, Van Dyke Parks, who hired Thompson to arrange Canon in D for Clang of the Yankee Reaper, said: "In terms of raw invention, I place Bob in the pantheon of Spike Jones, Les Paul, and Juan García Esquivel. Like Beethoven, they were 'populists' in good heart. They meant to appeal to the masses, and did so, by enlightening them."

Arrangement musical composition in altered form

In music, an arrangement is a musical reconceptualization of a previously composed work. It may differ from the original work by means of reharmonization, melodic paraphrasing, orchestration, or development of the formal structure. Arranging differs from orchestration in that the latter process is limited to the assignment of notes to instruments for performance by an orchestra, concert band, or other musical ensemble. Arranging "involves adding compositional techniques, such as new thematic material for introductions, transitions, or modulations, and endings.. .. Arranging is the art of giving an existing melody musical variety".

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References