The Midshipmaid

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The Midshipmaid
Directed by Albert de Courville
Produced by Michael Balcon (uncredited)
Written by Stafford Dickens
Based onthe play The Midshipmaid by Ian Hay & Stephen King-Hall
Starring Jessie Matthews
A.W. Baskcomb
Basil Sydney
Music by Jack Beaver (uncredited)
Cinematography Mutz Greenbaum
Edited by Ian Dalrymple
Ralph Kemplen
Production
company
Distributed by Woolf & Freedman Film Service (UK)
Release date
  • 8 December 1932 (1932-12-08)(London, UK)
Running time
84 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Midshipmaid is a 1932 British comedy film directed by Albert de Courville and starring Jessie Matthews, Frederick Kerr, Basil Sydney and Nigel Bruce. [1] The film is based on the 1931 play of the same title by Ian Hay and Stephen King-Hall. [2] it was released in the U.S. as Midshipmaid Gob. [3] John Mills makes his film debut in a supporting role. [4] It was shot at the Lime Grove Studios, with sets designed by the art director Alfred Junge.

Contents

Plot

In this comedy with musical interludes, pompous economy expert Sir Percy Newbiggin (Fred Kerr) visits the Naval Fleet in Malta to see what cuts can be made in their expenditure. The officers all fall over themselves to woo his beautiful daughter Celia (Jessie Matthews), who accompanies him: she becomes engaged to the son of the First Sea Lord and her father decides to leave economics to the Navy.

Cast

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The Midshipmaid is a 1931 British comedy play by Ian Hay and Stephen King-Hall. The following year Hay wrote a novel based on the play.

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References

  1. Denis Gifford, ed. (2016) [1973]. British Film Catalogue: Two Volume Set - The Fiction Film/The Non Fiction Film. 2. Routledge. p. 382. ISBN   978-1-57958-171-8.
  2. Goble, Alan (1 January 1999). The Complete Index to Literary Sources in Film. Walter de Gruyter. ISBN   9783110951943 via Google Books.
  3. "Midshipmaid Gob". TVGuide.com.
  4. "John Mills".