Thomas W. and Margaret Taliaferro House

Last updated
Thomas W. and Margaret Taliaferro House
ThomasWandMargaretTaliaferroHouse01.jpg
Location 1115 Eton Cross, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
Coordinates 42°34′35″N83°13′51″W / 42.57639°N 83.23083°W / 42.57639; -83.23083 (Thomas W. and Margaret Taliaferro House) Coordinates: 42°34′35″N83°13′51″W / 42.57639°N 83.23083°W / 42.57639; -83.23083 (Thomas W. and Margaret Taliaferro House)
Area 3.7 acres (1.5 ha)
Built 1925 (1925)
Architect Mildner & Eisen; (Richard Mildner, Adolph Eisen)
Architectural style Tudor Revival, Arts and Crafts
NRHP reference # 11000668 [1]
Added to NRHP September 15, 2011

The Thomas W. and Margaret Taliaferro House is a single-family home located at 1115 Eton Cross in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2011. [1]

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan City in Michigan, United States

Bloomfield Hills is a city located in Metro Detroit's northern suburbs in Oakland County in the U.S. state of Michigan, 20.2 miles (32.5 km) northwest of downtown Detroit. The city is almost completely surrounded by Bloomfield Township. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 3,869.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Contents

History

Thomas W. Taliaferro was born in Lynchburg, Virginia in 1863. His family moved to Chicago in the 1870s, and Taliaferro started working in the meat-packing industry as a clerk in about 1880. He was soon a bookkeeper and then cashier of the packinghouse Underwood & Co., and by 1885 he was plant superintendent. In 1886, Taliaferro married Margaret Forbes McKay, a native of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. The couple soon moved to Omaha, Nebraska, and and by 1897 Taliaferro was the general manager of Omaha Packing. By 1908, Taliaferro has moved the Detroit to become the vice-president of the meat-packing firm of Hammond, Standish & Co. He became president of the firm in 1922. [2]

Lynchburg, Virginia Independent city in Virginia, United States

Lynchburg is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 75,568. The 2017 census estimates an increase to 81,000. Located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains along the banks of the James River, Lynchburg is known as the "City of Seven Hills" or the "Hill City". In the 1860s, Lynchburg was the only major city in Virginia that was not recaptured by the Union before the end of the American Civil War.

Chicago City in Illinois, United States

Chicago, officially the City of Chicago, is the most populous city in Illinois and the third most populous city in the United States. With an estimated population of 2,716,450 (2017), it is the most populous city in the Midwestern United States. Chicago is the county seat of Cook County, the second most populous county in the United States, and the principal city of the Chicago metropolitan area, which is often referred to as "Chicagoland." The Chicago metropolitan area, at nearly 10 million people, is the third-largest in the United States, the fourth largest in North America, and the third largest metropolitan area in the world by land area.

Omaha, Nebraska City in Nebraska, United States

Omaha is the largest city in the state of Nebraska and the county seat of Douglas County. Omaha is located in the Midwestern United States on the Missouri River, about 10 miles (15 km) north of the mouth of the Platte River. The nation's 40th-largest city, Omaha's 2018 estimated population was 466,061.

By the 1920s, Bloomfield Hills was becoming suburbanized, with Judson Bradway developing first the Bloomfield Highlands subdivision in 1914, then the Bloomfield Estates and Bloomfield Manor subdivision, and then the Trowbridge Farms subdivision in 1917. Trowbridge Farms lots required that the house, exclusive of outbuildings or lot improvements, cost at least $10,000, and that no building could be set closer than twenty-five feet from a lot line. Thomas W. and Margaret Taliaferro had lived in Birmingham, Michigan since 1912, and in 1925 they purchased a lot and built this house, one of the first two houses built in the subdivision. The Taliaferros lived in this house until Margaret's death in 1939 and Thomas's in 1940. In 1941, the house was occupied by the Children's Fund of Michigan, in 1944 by John Singos and Marian Singos, in 1956 by Charles O. Miller, in 1968 by Herbert and Mary Jane Craw, and in 1974 by Conleyt and Nancy Bacon, who owned the house until at least 2011. [2]

Birmingham, Michigan City in Michigan, United States

Birmingham is a city in Oakland County on the north side of the Detroit Metro in the U.S. state of Michigan. It is located in the Woodward Corridor, between Royal Oak and Bloomfield Hills. As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,103.

Description

The Taliaferro house a two and-a-half-story T-shaped building of mixed Tudor Revival, Arts and Crafts design. It stands on a low, wooded hilltop. The house is asymmetrical, with a combination of gable and hip roofs. The exterior is clad in stucco with red brick and limestone trim and wood shingles on the dormers. A cross-gable-roof three-bay garage is sited near the house and connected by a gable-roof porte cochere. The central entrance door projects outward and is enframed with cut stone jambs and a brick arch overhead. A leaded glass panel is within the arch, and casement windows with stone surrounds flank the entrance. Above the door is a broad triple leaded glass window, and in the gable peak above is a decorative arched window. [2]

Next to the gabled entry section is a hip-roof portion of the house's front containing a paired casement leaded glass window with cut stone jambs on the first floor, and double-hung windows on the second. A shed dormer projects from the roof above. On the other side of the entrance is another paired leaded glass casement window, along with a pair of leaded glass French doors, above which is a double-hung window. [2]

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