Thompson Hall (University of New Hampshire)

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Thompson Hall
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Location105 Main St., University of New Hampshire campus, Durham, New Hampshire
Coordinates 43°8′9″N70°55′59″W / 43.13583°N 70.93306°W / 43.13583; -70.93306 Coordinates: 43°8′9″N70°55′59″W / 43.13583°N 70.93306°W / 43.13583; -70.93306
Arealess than one acre
Architect Dow & Randlett
Architectural styleRomanesque
NRHP reference # 96001468 [1]
Added to NRHPDecember 6, 1996

Thompson Hall, also commonly referred to locally as "T-hall", is one of the central buildings on the campus of the University of New Hampshire in Durham, New Hampshire, United States. A large brick and stone building, it was designed by Concord architects Dow & Randlett and built in 1892. It was the first building to be built on the Durham campus, and was named for Benjamin Thompson, a farmer who left his entire Durham estate to the state for use as the college campus. [2] The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996. [1]

University of New Hampshire public research university in New Hampshire, USA

The University of New Hampshire (UNH) is a public research university with its main campus in Durham, New Hampshire. It was founded and incorporated in 1866 as a land grant college in Hanover in connection with Dartmouth College. In 1893, UNH moved to Durham.

Durham, New Hampshire Town in New Hampshire, United States

Durham is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 14,638 at the 2010 census. Durham is home to the University of New Hampshire.

Concord, New Hampshire capital of New Hampshire

Concord is the capital city of the U.S. state of New Hampshire and the county seat of Merrimack County. As of the 2010 census, its population was 42,695.

Contents

Architecture

Thompson Hall is a Romanesque Revival structure set on a knoll just south of Main Street, with a broad expanse of lawn in between. Its features are characteristic of the style, with heavy massing, granite trim, and a tall clock tower. Although it is nominally 2-1/2 stories in height, it has a raised basement below, and its slate hip roof is pierced by gables, giving four usable stories of space. The tower is a massive square structure, rising five stories to a pyramidal roof, and features an electronic carillon installed in 1952, and a Howard clock donated by the architects. The main block and tower have round turrets projecting from their corners. [2]

Romanesque Revival architecture style of building employed beginning in the mid-19th century

Romanesque Revival is a style of building employed beginning in the mid-19th century inspired by the 11th- and 12th-century Romanesque architecture. Unlike the historic Romanesque style, however, Romanesque Revival buildings tended to feature more simplified arches and windows than their historic counterparts.

Carillon musical instrument consisting of several bells, often in a tower

A carillon is a musical instrument that is typically housed in the bell tower (belfry) of a church or municipal building. The instrument consists of at least 23 cast bronze, cup-shaped bells, which are played serially to produce a melody, or sounded together to play a chord. A traditional manual carillon is played by striking a keyboard – the stick-like keys of which are called batons – with the fists, and by pressing the keys of a pedal keyboard with the feet. The keys mechanically activate levers and wires that connect to metal clappers that strike the inside of the bells, allowing the performer on the bells, or carillonneur/carillonist to vary the intensity of the note according to the force applied to the key.

E. Howard & Co.

E. Howard & Co. was a clock and watch company formed by Edward Howard and Charles Rice in 1858, after the demise of the Boston Watch Company. The pair acquired some of the material and watches in progress, based upon a lien against the defunct company held by Rice, but they were unable to buy the existing factory or machinery, so they moved to Roxbury. Soon afterwards, Howard bought out Rice's interest and thereafter concentrated on high quality watches based on his own unique designs and eccentric production methods. E. Howard & Co. produced high grade watches, regulators, and marine clocks.

History

Thompson Hall was the first building to be built on the new campus of the New Hampshire College of Agricultural and Mechanical Arts, which had been founded in 1866 as a land grant college and was previously located near the Dartmouth College campus in Hanover. Benjamin Thompson, a Durham farmer, died 1890, leaving an estate worth $400,000, with 253 acres (102 ha) of land, to the state for use as an agricultural school. The state accepted his gift, and construction of Thompson Hall began in 1891, with a landscape plan for the campus developed by Charles Eliot. The unfinished hall was the site of graduation in spring 1893, and was formally opened for classes that fall. [2]

Dartmouth College private liberal arts university in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States

Dartmouth College is a private Ivy League research university in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. Established in 1769 by Eleazar Wheelock, it is the ninth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. Although founded as a school to educate Native Americans in Christian theology and the English way of life, Dartmouth primarily trained Congregationalist ministers throughout its early history. The university gradually secularized, and by the turn of the 20th century it had risen from relative obscurity into national prominence as one of the top centers of higher education.

Hanover, New Hampshire Town in New Hampshire, United States

Hanover is a town along the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 11,260 at the 2010 census. CNN and Money magazine rated Hanover the sixth best place to live in America in 2011, and the second best in 2007. "This just might be the best college town," read the headline of a story in the January–February 2017 issue of Yankee.

Charles Eliot (landscape architect) landscape architect

Charles Eliot was an American landscape architect. Known for pioneering principles of regional planning, naturalistic systems approach to landscape architecture, and laying the groundwork for conservancies across the world. Instrumental in the formation of The Trustees of Reservations, the world's first land trust, playing a central role in shaping the Boston Metropolitan Park System, designing a number of public and private landscapes, and wrote prolifically on a variety of topics.

The hall has housed the college president's office since its construction, and its other spaces have seen a wide variety of uses. At first it housed all of the college facilities, including classrooms, laboratories, a library, and a gymnasium. The gymnasium moved into a new building in 1899 and the library moved out in 1907. Over the following decades it came to house more administrative offices, as academic facilities moved to new buildings. In 1952, the building's single bell was replaced by an electronic carillon. The interior was extensively altered in 1986, retaining only a few rooms in their original appearance; one of these houses museum displays relating to the university's history. [2]

In the television series The Flash, Thompson Hall is used for an exterior shot of Central City University.[ citation needed ]

<i>The Flash</i> (2014 TV series) 2014 TV series

The Flash is an American superhero television series developed by Greg Berlanti, Andrew Kreisberg, and Geoff Johns, airing on The CW. It is based on the DC Comics character Barry Allen / Flash, a costumed superhero crime-fighter with the power to move at superhuman speeds. It is a spin-off from Arrow, existing in the same fictional universe. The series follows Barry Allen, portrayed by Grant Gustin, a crime scene investigator who gains super-human speed, which he uses to fight criminals, including others who have also gained superhuman abilities.

Central City (DC Comics) Fictional city from the DC Comics universe

Central City is a fictional American city appearing in comic books published by DC Comics. It is the home of the Silver Age version of the Flash, and first appeared in Showcase #4 in September–October 1956.

See also

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Strafford County, New Hampshire.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "NRHP nomination for Thompson Hall". National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-08-09.