Strafford County, New Hampshire

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Strafford County
Strafford County Courthouse, Dover NH.jpg
Strafford County Courthouse
Strafford County, New Hampshire seal.png
Map of New Hampshire highlighting Strafford County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of New Hampshire
New Hampshire in United States.svg
New Hampshire's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 43°15′30″N70°58′34″W / 43.258289°N 70.976105°W / 43.258289; -70.976105
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of New Hampshire.svg  New Hampshire
Founded1771
Named for William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford
Seat Dover
Largest cityDover
Area
  Total382.6 sq mi (991 km2)
  Land367.6 sq mi (952 km2)
  Water15.0 sq mi (39 km2)  3.9%
Population
 (2020)
  Total130,889
  Density356.1/sq mi (137.5/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 1st
Website www.co.strafford.nh.us

Strafford County is a county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. As of the 2020 census, the population was 130,889. [1] Its county seat is Dover. [2] Strafford County was one of the five original counties identified for New Hampshire in 1769. It was named after William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford in the mistaken belief that he was the ancestor of governor John Wentworth – although they were distantly related, William had no descendants. The county was organized at Dover in 1771. In 1840, the size of the original county was reduced with the creation of Belknap County.

Contents

Strafford County constitutes a portion of the Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area. It is estimated to be New Hampshire's county with the highest percentage growth over the 2010-2019 period. [3]

Geography

Strafford County is in southeastern New Hampshire, separated from York County in the state of Maine by the Salmon Falls River. The southern part of the Salmon Falls, from Rollinsford to Dover, is a tidal river that flows into the Piscataqua River.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 384 square miles (990 km2), of which 369 square miles (960 km2) is land and 15 square miles (39 km2) (3.9%) is water. [4] It is the smallest county in New Hampshire by area.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 23,611
1800 32,61438.1%
1810 41,59527.5%
1820 51,11722.9%
1830 58,91015.2%
1840 61,1273.8%
1850 29,374−51.9%
1860 31,4937.2%
1870 30,243−4.0%
1880 35,55817.6%
1890 38,4428.1%
1900 39,3372.3%
1910 38,951−1.0%
1920 38,546−1.0%
1930 38,5800.1%
1940 43,55312.9%
1950 51,56718.4%
1960 59,79916.0%
1970 70,43117.8%
1980 85,40821.3%
1990 104,23322.0%
2000 112,2337.7%
2010 123,1439.7%
2020 130,8896.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [5]
1790-1960 [6] 1900-1990 [7]
1990-2000 [8] 2010-2018 [9]

2000 census

As of the census [10] of 2000, there were 112,233 people, 42,581 households, and 27,762 families living in the county. The population density was 304 inhabitants per square mile (117/km2). There were 45,539 housing units at an average density of 124 per square mile (48/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.29% White, 0.63% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 1.39% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.30% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. 1.03% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 15.8% were of English, 14.9% Irish, 14.0% French, 10.5% French Canadian, 7.6% American, 6.3% Italian and 6.2% German ancestry. 93.7% spoke English and 3.2% French as their first language.

There were 42,581 households, out of which 32.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.10% were married couples living together, 10.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.80% were non-families. 24.80% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.70% under the age of 18, 13.60% from 18 to 24, 30.60% from 25 to 44, 20.90% from 45 to 64, and 11.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $44,803, and the median income for a family was $53,075. Males had a median income of $36,661 versus $26,208 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,479. About 5.00% of families and 9.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.10% of those under age 18 and 6.60% of those age 65 or over.

The largest cities in Strafford County are Dover (population) and Rochester (land area) .

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 123,143 people, 47,100 households, and 29,862 families living in the county. [11] The population density was 333.7 inhabitants per square mile (128.8/km2). There were 51,697 housing units at an average density of 140.1 per square mile (54.1/km2). [12] The racial makeup of the county was 93.8% white, 2.6% Asian, 1.0% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.8% of the population. [11] In terms of ancestry, 24.4% were French or French Canadian, 19.7% were Irish, 17.4% were English, 9.5% were Italian, 8.7% were German, 5.2% were American, and 5.0% were Scottish. [13]

Of the 47,100 households, 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 36.6% were non-families, and 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.93. The median age was 36.9 years. [11]

The median income for a household in the county was $57,809 and the median income for a family was $72,286. Males had a median income of $50,489 versus $37,178 for females. The per capita income for the county was $28,059. About 6.7% of families and 11.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.3% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over. [14]

Politics and government

United States presidential election results for Strafford County, New Hampshire [15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 30,48941.31%41,72156.53%1,5952.16%
2016 29,07242.13%34,89450.57%5,0347.30%
2012 26,72941.78%36,02656.32%1,2141.90%
2008 25,02139.19%37,99059.50%8371.31%
2004 25,82543.56%32,94255.57%5140.87%
2000 21,10842.73%25,40051.42%2,8855.84%
1996 14,48433.81%23,47554.79%4,88411.40%
1992 16,02833.72%21,24744.69%10,26421.59%
1988 20,63654.74%16,54743.89%5151.37%
1984 20,45261.31%12,75238.23%1520.46%
1980 16,39950.41%11,04133.94%5,09115.65%
1976 14,56948.86%14,56648.85%6802.28%
1972 16,84657.83%12,02841.29%2550.88%
1968 12,42747.28%13,12949.95%7272.77%
1964 8,34231.99%17,73768.01%00.00%
1960 13,53948.57%14,33551.43%00.00%
1956 15,49461.58%9,65938.39%70.03%
1952 13,72953.88%11,75346.12%00.00%
1948 9,98845.87%11,60353.28%1850.85%
1944 9,38842.87%12,49757.07%130.06%
1940 8,99641.18%12,84758.82%00.00%
1936 8,21541.71%11,00555.87%4772.42%
1932 9,06047.44%9,97052.20%680.36%
1928 10,47058.36%7,44141.48%280.16%
1924 9,16756.63%6,44539.82%5753.55%
1920 8,70060.37%5,64339.15%690.48%
1916 4,03749.58%4,04049.62%650.80%
1912 2,96237.66%3,46844.09%1,43618.26%
1908 4,82256.25%3,52341.09%2282.66%
1904 4,86956.58%3,55341.29%1832.13%
1900 4,98755.32%3,79242.06%2362.62%
1896 5,48368.58%2,25928.26%2533.16%
1892 4,66651.68%4,22946.84%1341.48%
1888 4,58051.28%4,27047.81%820.92%
1884 4,37052.74%3,78145.63%1351.63%
1880 4,63453.78%3,92245.51%610.71%
1876 4,05254.64%3,36345.35%10.01%

County Commission

The executive power of Strafford County's government is held by three county commissioners. [16]

NameHometownParty
George Maglaras Dover Democratic
Robert Watson Rochester Democratic
Deanna Rollo Rollinsford Democratic

In addition to the County Commission, there are five directly elected officials: they include County Attorney, Register of Deeds, County Sheriff, Register of Probate, and County Treasurer. [17]

OfficeName
County AttorneyThomas Velardi (D)
Register of DeedsCatherine Berube (D)
County SheriffMark Brave (D)
Register of ProbateLuz Bay (D)
County TreasurerPamela Arnold (D)

[18]

General court

The general court delegation of Strafford County is made up of all of the members of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from the county. There are 37 members from 25 different districts. After the 2020 elections, the party distribution of representatives for the county was as follows.

AffiliationMembersVoting share
Democratic Party 2464.9%
Republican Party 1335.1%
Total37100%

Communities

Order naming Daniel Waldron justice of the peace, Strafford County, 1815 Daniel Waldron Justice of the Peace.jpg
Order naming Daniel Waldron justice of the peace, Strafford County, 1815

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Villages

See also

Footnotes

  1. "Census - Geography Profile: Strafford County, New Hampshire". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Strafford County, New Hampshire". www.census.gov. Retrieved April 11, 2021.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on December 27, 2014. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  5. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  6. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  7. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  8. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  9. "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 24, 2013.
  10. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  11. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  12. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  13. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  14. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  15. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  16. http://sos.nh.gov/2016CountyGen.aspx?id=8589964161
  17. "State and County Elected Officials".
  18. "General Election Winners - 11/03/2020" (PDF). New Hampshire Secretary of State's Office. November 11, 2020. Retrieved December 8, 2020.

Further reading

Coordinates: 43°17′N71°02′W / 43.29°N 71.03°W / 43.29; -71.03

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