Rockingham County, New Hampshire

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Rockingham County
Portsmouth NH aerial view.jpg
Aerial view of Portsmouth
Map of New Hampshire highlighting Rockingham County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of New Hampshire
New Hampshire in United States.svg
New Hampshire's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 42°57′46″N71°04′39″W / 42.962872°N 71.077621°W / 42.962872; -71.077621
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of New Hampshire.svg  New Hampshire
Founded1769
Named for Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham
Seat Brentwood
Largest town Derry
Area
  Total795.2 sq mi (2,060 km2)
  Land695.4 sq mi (1,801 km2)
  Water99.9 sq mi (259 km2)  12.6%
Population
 (2020)
  Total314,176
  Density400/sq mi (150/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts 1st, 2nd
Website www.rockinghamcountynh.org

Rockingham County is a county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. At the 2020 census, the population was 314,176, [1] making it New Hampshire's second-most populous county. The county seat is Brentwood. [2] Rockingham County is part of the Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH Metropolitan Statistical Area and the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area. Per the 2020 census, it was New Hampshire's fastest growing county from 2010 to 2020.

Contents

As of 2014-2018 estimates from the American Community Survey, Rockingham County was the 4th wealthiest county in New England, with a median household income of $90,429. [3]

History

The area that today is Rockingham County was first settled by Europeans moving north from the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts as early as 1623. The government was linked tightly with Massachusetts until New Hampshire became a separate colony in 1679, but counties were not introduced until 1769.

Rockingham was identified in 1769 as one of five original counties for the colony. It is named for Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham, who had been Prime Minister from 1765 to 1766. The county was organized in 1771, with its county seat at Exeter. In 1823, a portion of Hillsborough Country became part of the formation of Merrimack County. In 1844, its area was further reduced by the formation of Belknap County to the northwest. In 1997, the county court facilities were moved to Brentwood, a rural town adjacent to Exeter. [4]

Geography

The county occupies the southeastern corner of the state of New Hampshire, and it contains the state's easternmost point. The county contains all of New Hampshire's Atlantic coast, which, at approximately 18 miles (29 km), is the shortest ocean coastline of any state in the U.S. [5] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 795 square miles (2,060 km2), of which 695 square miles (1,800 km2) are land and 100 square miles (260 km2) (13%) are water. [6] Its highest point is Nottingham Mountain, at 1,340 feet (410 m), in Deerfield.

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 43,184
1800 45,4275.2%
1810 50,17510.5%
1820 55,24610.1%
1830 44,325−19.8%
1840 45,7713.3%
1850 49,1947.5%
1860 50,1221.9%
1870 47,297−5.6%
1880 49,0643.7%
1890 49,6501.2%
1900 51,1183.0%
1910 52,1882.1%
1920 52,4980.6%
1930 53,7502.4%
1940 58,1428.2%
1950 70,05920.5%
1960 99,02941.4%
1970 138,95140.3%
1980 190,34537.0%
1990 245,84529.2%
2000 277,35912.8%
2010 295,2236.4%
2020 314,1766.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790-1960 [8] 1900-1990 [9]
1990-2000 [10] 2010-2020 [11]

2000 census

As of the census [12] of 2000, there were 277,359 people, 104,529 households, and 74,320 families living in the county. The population density was 399 inhabitants per square mile (154/km2). There were 113,023 housing units at an average density of 163 per square mile (63/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.80% White, 0.58% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 1.11% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.38% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. 1.19% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 18.1% were of Irish, 14.6% English, 11.8% Italian, 10.5% French, 8.0% French Canadian, 6.0% German and 5.6% American ancestry. 94.3% spoke English, 1.8% French and 1.3% Spanish as their first language.

There were 104,529 households, out of which 35.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.50% were married couples living together, 8.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.90% were non-families. 22.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.40% under the age of 18, 6.20% from 18 to 24, 32.80% from 25 to 44, 24.40% from 45 to 64, and 10.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $58,150, and the median income for a family was $66,345. (These figures had risen to $72,600 and $85,361 respectively, as of a 2007 estimate. [13] ) Males had a median income of $45,598 versus $30,741 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,656. About 3.10% of families and 4.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.00% of those under age 18 and 6.40% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 295,223 people, 115,033 households, and 79,832 families living in the county. [14] The population density was 425.0 inhabitants per square mile (164.1/km2). There were 126,709 housing units at an average density of 182.4 per square mile (70.4/km2). [15] The racial makeup of the county was 95.5% white, 1.7% Asian, 0.7% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.1% of the population. [14] In terms of ancestry, 26.9% were Irish, 19.0% were English, 14.8% were Italian, 9.7% were German, 7.3% were French Canadian, 5.6% were Polish, and 3.8% were American. [16]

Of the 115,033 households, 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.4% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.6% were non-families, and 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.03. The median age was 42.2 years. [14]

The median income for a household in the county was $75,825 and the median income for a family was $90,463. Males had a median income of $61,443 versus $42,478 for females. The per capita income for the county was $35,889. About 3.0% of families and 4.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over. [17]

Politics and government

Rockingham County has historically been a Republican stronghold, but the county is now competitive. Three Democratic presidential nominees have won it since 1964, including Joe Biden in 2020, who was the first to win a majority since Lyndon B. Johnson.

The county is divided between the Democratic stronghold that is the Seacoast Region, and the conservative western portions of the county.

Rockingham County is one of only thirteen counties to have voted for Obama in 2008, Romney in 2012, Trump in 2016, and Biden in 2020. [lower-alpha 1]

United States presidential election results for Rockingham County, New Hampshire [18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 95,85848.09%100,06450.20%3,4201.72%
2016 90,44749.85%79,99444.09%10,9936.06%
2012 87,92151.59%80,14247.03%2,3601.38%
2008 81,91748.81%83,72349.89%2,1821.30%
2004 82,06951.68%75,43747.50%1,3100.82%
2000 65,86049.09%61,62845.93%6,6854.98%
1996 46,20140.80%53,64447.37%13,40311.84%
1992 47,35338.25%44,31735.80%32,13625.96%
1988 64,03463.15%35,77535.28%1,5961.57%
1984 57,58669.01%25,55730.63%2970.36%
1980 45,96057.83%21,71227.32%11,80214.85%
1976 36,73853.92%30,05144.11%1,3411.97%
1972 38,82563.09%21,99835.75%7181.17%
1968 28,84254.98%21,19540.41%2,4194.61%
1964 19,49841.70%27,25658.30%00.00%
1960 28,03262.16%17,06337.84%00.00%
1956 28,22673.42%10,19826.53%180.05%
1952 26,28068.58%12,04031.42%00.00%
1948 18,89060.68%11,93738.35%3010.97%
1944 17,14456.55%13,17043.44%20.01%
1940 16,22353.68%14,00146.32%00.00%
1936 15,46654.75%12,20743.21%5762.04%
1932 14,90256.44%11,36343.03%1400.53%
1928 17,59069.18%7,78230.61%530.21%
1924 14,53068.42%6,07328.60%6342.99%
1920 13,81167.29%6,58232.07%1320.64%
1916 5,86650.29%5,63748.32%1621.39%
1912 4,23137.54%4,30638.21%2,73324.25%
1908 6,81460.34%4,11836.47%3613.20%
1904 7,21660.97%4,32036.50%2992.53%
1900 7,36359.29%4,71938.00%3372.71%
1896 7,88169.32%2,99226.32%4964.36%
1892 6,38050.75%5,96147.42%2301.83%
1888 6,45048.76%6,55349.54%2261.71%
1884 6,16250.63%5,68246.69%3262.68%
1880 6,96053.25%5,98945.82%1210.93%
1876 6,42253.51%5,57646.46%30.02%

County Commission

The executive power of Rockingham County's government is held by three county commissioners, each representing one of the three commissioner districts within the county. [19]

DistrictsNameHometownParty
District 1Kate Coyle Portsmouth, NH Democratic
District 2Thomas Tombarello Sandown, NH Republican
District 3Brian Chirichiello Derry, NH Republican

In addition to the County Commission, there are five directly elected officials: they include County Attorney, Register of Deeds, County Sheriff, Register of Probate, and County Treasurer. [20]

OfficeName
County AttorneyPatricia Conway (R)
Register of DeedsCathy Stacey (R)
County SheriffChuck Massahos (R)
Register of ProbateRay Tweedie (R)
County TreasurerScott Priestley (R)

Legislative branch

The legislative branch of Rockingham County is made up of the members of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from the county. In total, as of August 2018 there are 90 members from 37 different districts.

AffiliationMembersVoting share
Democratic Party 2932.2%
Republican Party 6167.8%
Total90100%

After redistricting based on the 2010 United States Census, Rockingham County was split between 8 state senate districts: [21]

DistrictAreas of Rockingham CountySenatorPartyFirst electedResidence
14 Londonderry, Auburn Sharon Carson Republican2010 Londonderry
16 Candia Kevin Cavanaugh Democratic2017 Manchester
17 Raymond, Northwood, Nottingham, Deerfield John Reagan Republican2012 Deerfield
19 Windham, Derry, Hampstead Regina Birdsell Republican2014 Hampstead
21 Portsmouth, Newington, Newmarket, Newfields Rebecca Perkins Kwoka Democratic2020 Portsmouth
22 Salem, Atkinston, Plaistow Chuck Morse Republican2010 Salem
23 Exeter, Brentwood, Epping, Fremont, Kingston, East Kingston, Danville, Sandown, Chester Bill Gannon Republican2020 Sandown
24 New Castle, Rye, Stratham, North Hampton, Greenland, Hampton, Hampton Falls, Seabrook, Kensington, South Hampton Newton Tom Sherman Democratic2018 Rye

Attractions

Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth is a collection of historic buildings from the 17th through 19th centuries. Canobie Lake Park, in Salem, is an amusement park that opened in 1902. Rockingham Park racetrack, which featured weekly horse racing until 2009, was also in Salem. The site of the former track, next to the Mall at Rockingham Park, is being redeveloped as Tuscan Village, a mixed-use development. America's Stonehenge, which claims to be a pre-Columbian collection of stone structures, is in northern Salem. Derry was home to poet Robert Frost, who taught at nearby Pinkerton Academy. His home, the Robert Frost Farm, has been preserved as a state park.

Rockingham County is also home to New Hampshire's entire seacoast and features several popular resort towns. Hampton Beach has a boardwalk and Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom. Rye features several undeveloped beaches such as Odiorne Point State Park and contains New Hampshire's portion of the Isles of Shoals. Seabrook contains Seabrook Greyhound Racing Park and the Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant, the last nuclear plant opened in the United States.

Communities

Map of school administrative units in Rockingham County Rockingham County SAU.png
Map of school administrative units in Rockingham County

City

Towns

Census-designated places

Villages

Education

School districts include: [22]

K-12 districts
Secondary districts
Elementary districts

There is also a privately-endowed, publicly-funded school, Pinkerton Academy in Derry. Towns in Rockingham County that send their public high school students to Pinkerton, other than Derry, include: Auburn, Candia, Chester, and Hampstead. [23] Prior to 1978 Londonderry sent its high schoolers to Pinkerton. [24] Previously Auburn and Candia sent high school students to the Manchester School District. [25] [26]

See also

Notes

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Merrimack County, New Hampshire</span> County in New Hampshire, United States

Merrimack County is a county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. As of the 2020 Census, the population was 153,808, making it the third-most populous county in New Hampshire. Its county seat is Concord, the state capital. The county was organized in 1823 from parts of Hillsborough and Rockingham counties, and is named for the Merrimack River. Merrimack County comprises the Concord, NH Micropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn constitutes a portion of the Boston–Worcester–Providence, MA–RI–NH–CT Combined Statistical Area. In 2010, the center of population of New Hampshire was located in Merrimack County, in the town of Pembroke.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Atkinson, New Hampshire</span> Place in New Hampshire, United States

Atkinson is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 7,087 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Auburn, New Hampshire</span> Place in New Hampshire, United States

Auburn is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 5,946 at the 2020 census, up from 4,953 at the 2010 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Candia, New Hampshire</span> Place in New Hampshire, United States

Candia is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 4,013 at the 2020 census. The town includes the villages of Candia, Candia Four Corners and East Candia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Chester, New Hampshire</span> Town in New Hampshire, United States

Chester is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 5,232 at the 2020 census, up from 4,768 at the 2010 census. It was home to the now defunct Chester College.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Deerfield, New Hampshire</span> Town in New Hampshire, United States

Deerfield is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 4,855 at the 2020 census, up from 4,280 at the 2010 census. Deerfield is the location of the annual Deerfield Fair.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hampstead, New Hampshire</span> Place in New Hampshire, United States

Hampstead is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 8,998 at the 2020 census. Hampstead, which includes the village of East Hampstead, is home to a portion of the Rockingham Recreational Trail.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hampton Falls, New Hampshire</span> Place in New Hampshire, United States

Hampton Falls is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 2,403 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kensington, New Hampshire</span> Place in New Hampshire, United States

Kensington is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 2,095 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Plaistow, New Hampshire</span> Place in New Hampshire, United States

Plaistow is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 7,830 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Salem, New Hampshire</span> Town in New Hampshire, United States

Salem is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 30,089 at the 2020 census. Being located on Interstate 93 as the first town in New Hampshire, which lacks any state sales tax, Salem has grown into a commercial hub, anchored by the Mall at Rockingham Park. Other major sites include Canobie Lake Park, a large amusement park; and America's Stonehenge, a stone structure of disputed origins. It is the former home of Rockingham Park, a horse racetrack. The Sununu political family hails from Salem, including former New Hampshire governor and White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, and his sons John E. Sununu, a former U.S. senator, and Chris Sununu, current New Hampshire governor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sandown, New Hampshire</span> Town in New Hampshire, United States

Sandown is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 6,548 at the 2020 census, up from 5,986 at the 2010 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Seabrook, New Hampshire</span> Town in New Hampshire, United States

Seabrook is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 8,401 at the 2020 census. Located at the southern end of the coast of New Hampshire on the border with Massachusetts, Seabrook is noted as the location of the Seabrook Station Nuclear Power Plant, the third-most recently constructed nuclear power plant in the United States.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">South Hampton, New Hampshire</span> Town in New Hampshire, United States

South Hampton is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 894 at the 2020 census. South Hampton is home to Cowden State Forest and Powwow River State Forest.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Windham, New Hampshire</span> Town in New Hampshire, United States

Windham is a suburban town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population at the 2020 census was 15,817, up from 13,592 in 2010.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hooksett, New Hampshire</span> Town in New Hampshire, United States

Hooksett is a town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 14,871 at the 2020 census, up from 13,451 at the 2010 census. The town is located between Manchester, the state's largest city, and Concord, the state capital. A prominent landmark is Robie's Country Store, a National Historic Landmark and a frequent stop for presidential candidates during the New Hampshire primary.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hampton, New Hampshire</span> Place in New Hampshire, United States

Hampton is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 16,214 at the 2020 census. On the Atlantic Ocean coast, Hampton is home to Hampton Beach, a summer tourist destination.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Londonderry, New Hampshire</span> Town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States of America

Londonderry is a town in western Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. It sits between Manchester and Derry, the largest and fourth-largest communities in the state. The population was 25,826 at the 2020 census. Londonderry is known for its apple orchards and is home to the headquarters of Stonyfield Farm and part of Manchester-Boston Regional Airport.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Derry, New Hampshire</span> Town in New Hampshire, US

Derry is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 34,317 at the 2020 census. Although it is a town and not a city, Derry is the most populous community in Rockingham County and the fourth most populous in the state. The town's nickname, "Spacetown", derives from the fact that Derry is the birthplace of Alan Shepard, the first astronaut from the United States in space. Derry was also for a time the home of the poet Robert Frost and his family.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Seabrook Beach, New Hampshire</span> Census-designated place in New Hampshire, United States

Seabrook Beach is a census-designated place in the town of Seabrook and partially in the town of Hampton in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. It had a population of 1,078 at the 2020 census.

References

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  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. Bureau, US Census. "American Community Survey (ACS)". The United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 5, 2021.
  4. "Ignoring quality issues at courthouse is criminal". The Exeter News-Letter. Retrieved March 10, 2009.
  5. des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/wmb/coastal/documents/coastal_access_map.pdf
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  13. "American FactFinder - Community Facts". factfinder.census.gov. Archived from the original on February 11, 2020. Retrieved May 9, 2017.
  14. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  15. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  16. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  17. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  18. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 9, 2018.
  19. http://sos.nh.gov/2016CountyGen.aspx?id=8589963586
  20. "Departments – Rockingham County, NH".
  21. "NH-SOS - 2020 Election Information".
  22. "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Rockingham County, NH" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau . Retrieved July 22, 2022. - Text list
  23. "Sending towns". Pinkerton Academy . Retrieved April 24, 2022.
  24. "LONDONDERRY SCHOOL DISTRICT, SAU #12, LONDONDERRY, NH" (PDF). Londonderry School District. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 7, 2007. Retrieved July 22, 2022.
  25. Huss, Julie (March 17, 2011). "Pinkerton welcomes Auburn". Derry News . Retrieved April 25, 2022.
  26. Huss, Julie (March 15, 2016). "Candia voters say yes to Pinkerton". Derry News . Retrieved April 24, 2022.

Further reading

Coordinates: 42°59′N71°05′W / 42.99°N 71.09°W / 42.99; -71.09