Three Cheers for the Irish

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Three Cheers for the Irish
Three Cheers for the Irish.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Lloyd Bacon
Produced by Samuel Bischoff
Screenplay byRichard Macaulay
Jerry Wald
Starring Priscilla Lane
Thomas Mitchell
Dennis Morgan
Virginia Grey
Irene Hervey
Alan Hale, Sr.
Music by Adolph Deutsch
Cinematography Charles Rosher
Edited by William Holmes
Production
company
Distributed byWarner Bros.
Release date
  • March 16, 1940 (1940-03-16)
Running time
99 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Three Cheers for the Irish is a 1940 comedy film directed by Lloyd Bacon, written by Richard Macaulay and Jerry Wald, and starring Priscilla Lane, Thomas Mitchell and Dennis Morgan. The supporting cast features Virginia Grey, Alan Hale, Sr. and William Lundigan. The plot involves a veteran police officer (Mitchell) forced into retirement only to learn that his replacement (Morgan), whom he detests, is romancing his daughter (Lane). The film was released by Warner Bros. on March 16, 1940. [1] [2]

Contents

Plot

Cast

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References

  1. Nugent, Frank S. "Three-Cheers-for-the-Irish - Trailer - Cast - Showtimes". NYTimes.com. Retrieved 2015-06-16.
  2. "Three Cheers for the Irish (1940) - Overview". TCM.com. Retrieved 2015-06-16.
  3. "Three Cheers for the Irish". filmaffinity.com . Retrieved 18 December 2015.