Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae

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Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae (LH 580a), also known as Dallas Piece or Vertebrae, is an abstract bronze sculpture by Henry Moore. [1] It was cast in 1978–79, specifically for a site outside I.M. Pei's Dallas City Hall, and is the largest version of a sculpture that Moore created in 1968.

Abstract art Art with a degree of independence from visual references in the world

Abstract art uses visual language of shape, form, color and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from visual references in the world. Western art had been, from the Renaissance up to the middle of the 19th century, underpinned by the logic of perspective and an attempt to reproduce an illusion of visible reality. The arts of cultures other than the European had become accessible and showed alternative ways of describing visual experience to the artist. By the end of the 19th century many artists felt a need to create a new kind of art which would encompass the fundamental changes taking place in technology, science and philosophy. The sources from which individual artists drew their theoretical arguments were diverse, and reflected the social and intellectual preoccupations in all areas of Western culture at that time.

Bronze sculpture sculpture cast in bronze

Bronze is the most popular metal for cast metal sculptures; a cast bronze sculpture is often called simply a "bronze". It can be used for statues, singly or in groups, reliefs, and small statuettes and figurines, as well as bronze elements to be fitted to other objects such as furniture. It is often gilded to give gilt-bronze or ormolu.

Henry Moore English artist known for sculpture (1898–1986)

Henry Spencer Moore was an English artist. He is best known for his semi-abstract monumental bronze sculptures which are located around the world as public works of art. As well as sculpture, Moore produced many drawings, including a series depicting Londoners sheltering from the Blitz during the Second World War, along with other graphic works on paper.

The three part sculpture looks back to his earlier multi-part sculptures of human figures, and also his interlocking works such as Two Piece Sculpture No. 7: Pipe from 1966. Moore started with a plaster maquette in 1968, with three interlocking elements inspired by bones or flints. He created a second larger plaster working model, which was cast in bronze in 1968 as his Working Model for Three Piece No.3: Vertebrae (LH 579), in an edition of eight (plus an artist's copy, which is at the Tate Gallery in London). [2] It measures 94 by 236.3 by 122 centimetres (37.0 in × 93.0 in × 48.0 in). Other casts are held by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington D.C., [3] the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, and Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester, New York, [4] and the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. [5] Others are in private collections. [6] One example was sold at Christie's in 2012 for over £5m. [7]

Flint Cryptocrystalline form of the mineral quartz

Flint is a hard, sedimentary cryptocrystalline form of the mineral quartz, categorized as the variety of chert that occurs in chalk or marly limestone. Flint was widely used historically to make stone tools and start fires.

<i>Three-Piece No. 3: Vertebrae (Working Model)</i> sculpture by Henry Moore (LH 579, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden)

Three-Piece No. 3: Vertebrae is a bronze sculpture by Henry Moore. It was cast in 1968 as in edition of 8, along with an artist's copy which is now part of the Tate collection.

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Art museum in D.C., on the National Mall

The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden is an art museum beside the National Mall, in Washington, D.C., the United States. The museum was initially endowed during the 1960s with the permanent art collection of Joseph H. Hirshhorn. It was designed by architect Gordon Bunshaft and is part of the Smithsonian Institution. It was conceived as the United States' museum of contemporary and modern art and currently focuses its collection-building and exhibition-planning mainly on the post–World War II period, with particular emphasis on art made during the last 50 years.

The working model was scaled up in 1968–69 into a full-size bronze sculpture, measuring 9 feet (2.7 m) x 24 feet (7.3 m) x 10 feet 7 inches (3.23 m) (LH 580). The full-size sculpture was cast in edition of three (plus one for the artist). One example is installed outside the Safeco Plaza (1001 4th Avenue) in Seattle, Washington. [8] It was surveyed and deemed "well maintained" by the Smithsonian Institution's "Save Outdoor Sculpture!" program in May 1995. [1] [9] The others are at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, [10] and the Landesbausparkasse in Münster, [11] with the artist's copy at the Henry Moore Foundation in Perry Green, Hertfordshire.

Safeco Plaza (Seattle) Skyscraper in Seattle

Safeco Plaza, previously 1001 Fourth Avenue Plaza and the Seattle-First National Bank Building, is a 50-story, 630-foot (190 m) skyscraper in the northwest United States, located in downtown Seattle, Washington. The building is sometimes referred to by locals as "The Box the Space Needle Came In."

Smithsonian Institution Group of museums and research centers administered by the United States government

The Smithsonian Institution, also known simply as the Smithsonian, is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States. It was founded on August 10, 1846, "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge". The institution is named after its founding donor, British scientist James Smithson. It was originally organized as the "United States National Museum", but that name ceased to exist as an administrative entity in 1967.

Save Outdoor Sculpture!

Save Outdoor Sculpture! (SOS!) is a community-based effort to identify, document, and conserve outdoor sculpture in the United States. By fostering awareness and appreciation, SOS! aims to advocate proper care of a nationwide public resource.

Moore was commissioned in 1978 to create a sculpture to stand in the City Centre Park Plaza outside the Dallas City Hall, for which he scaled up his 1968–69 work Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae. [5]

Dallas City Hall seat of Dallas municipal government

Dallas City Hall is the seat of municipal government of the city of Dallas, Texas, United States. It is located at 1500 Marilla in the Government District of downtown Dallas. The current building, the city's fifth city hall, was completed in 1978 and replaced the Dallas Municipal Building.

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<i>Family Group</i> (Moore) sculpture series by Henry Moore (LH 269)

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<i>UNESCO Reclining Figure 1957–58</i> sculpture by Henry Moore (LH 416, UNESCO, Paris)

UNESCO Reclining Figure 1957–58 is a sculpture by Henry Moore. It was made in a series of scales, from a small plaster maquette, through a half-size working model made in plaster and cast in bronze, to a full-size version carved in Roman travertine marble in 1957–1958. The final work was installed in 1958 at the World Heritage Centre, the headquarters of UNESCO at the Place de Fontenoy in Paris. This was Moore's last major public commission in which he created a new work for a specific site; he afterwards generally worked from an existing sketch or model.

<i>Reclining Figure (Lincoln Center)</i> sculpture by Henry Moore (LH 519, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York City)

Reclining Figure 1963–5 is a statue by Henry Moore. The two-part bronze statue of a human figure was commissioned for the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City, where it has been displayed outdoors since 1965 in a pool of water to the north of the new Metropolitan Opera House.

Three Way Piece No.2: Archer sculpture by Henry Moore (LH 535, Toronto)

Three Way Piece No.2: Archer is a large sculpture by the British artist Henry Moore. Two casts exist: cast 1 in Toronto, cast 2 owned by the National Gallery, Berlin. The work is 340 cm long and 325 cm high. A plaster cast of the work was also made, and was shown in June 1965 at the Queen's Theatre in London as part of a memorial service to T.S. Eliot.

<i>Locking Piece</i>

Locking Piece is a sculpture by Henry Moore. It comprises two interlocking forms holding a third element between them, on a bronze base. It is usually mounted on a separate plinth. The sculpture was created in 1962–1964, and bronze casts were made in 1964–1967.

References

  1. 1 2 "Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae, (sculpture)". Smithsonian Institution . Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  2. "'Working Model for Three Piece No.3: Vertebrae', Henry Moore OM, CH: Catalogue entry". Tate. 1980-12-12. Retrieved 2016-04-04.
  3. "Works in Public – Working Model for Three Piece No.3: Vertebrae 1968 (LH 579)". Henry Moore. Retrieved 2016-04-04.
  4. "Works in Public – Working Model for Three Piece No.3: Vertebrae 1968 (LH 579)". Henry Moore. Retrieved 2016-04-04.
  5. 1 2 "Henry Moore – Works in Public – Working Model for Three Piece No.3: Vertebrae 1968 (LH 579)". Henry-moore-fdn.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-04-04.
  6. "Henry Moore OM, CH, 'Working Model for Three Piece No.3: Vertebrae' 1968, cast c.1968 (Henry Moore: Sculptural Process and Public Identity)". Tate. 1978-06-26. Retrieved 2016-04-04.
  7. "Henry Moore (1898–1986) | Working Model for Three Piece No. 3: Vertebrae | Sculptures, Statues & Figures, bronze | Christie's". Christies.com. 2012-02-07. Retrieved 2016-04-04.
  8. "Safeco Plaza". hines.com. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  9. "Works in Public – Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae 1968–69 (LH 580)". Henry Moore. Retrieved 2016-04-04.
  10. "Works in Public – Three Pieces Sculpture: Vertebrae 1968–69 (LH 580)". Henry Moore. Retrieved 2016-04-04.
  11. "Works in Public – Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae 1968–69 (LH 580)". Henry Moore. Retrieved 2016-04-04.