Throckmorton

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Irish House of Commons

The Irish House of Commons was the lower house of the Parliament of Ireland that existed from 1297 until 1800. The upper house was the House of Lords. The membership of the House of Commons was directly elected, but on a highly restrictive franchise, similar to the Unreformed House of Commons in contemporary England and Great Britain. In counties, forty-shilling freeholders were enfranchised whilst in most boroughs it was either only the members of self-electing corporations or a highly-restricted body of freemen that were able to vote for the borough's representatives. Most notably, Catholics were disqualified from sitting in the Irish parliament from 1691, even though they comprised the vast majority of the Irish population. From 1728 until 1793 they were also disfranchised. Most of the population of all religions had no vote. The vast majority of parliamentary boroughs were pocket boroughs, the private property of an aristocratic patron. When these boroughs were disfranchised under the Act of Union, the patron was awarded £15,000 compensation for each.

Earl of Winchilsea Title in the Peerage of England

Earl of Winchilsea is a title in the Peerage of England held by the Finch-Hatton family. It has been united with the title of Earl of Nottingham under a single holder since 1729. The Finch family is believed to be descended from Henry FitzHerbert, Lord Chamberlain to Henry I. The name change to Finch came in the 1350s after marriage to an heiress by a member of the Finch family. In 1660 the 3rd Earl of Winchilsea was created Baron FitzHerbert of Eastwell, Kent, in recompense for his efficient aid in the Restoration of the Monarchy. The Herbert family of Wales, Earls of Pembroke, share common ancestry but bear differenced arms. A later member of the family, Sir William Finch, was knighted in 1513. His son Sir Thomas Finch, was also knighted for his share in suppressing Sir Thomas Wyatt's insurrection against Queen Mary I, and was the son-in-law of Sir Thomas Moyle, some of whose lands Finch's wife inherited. Thomas's eldest son Moyle Finch represented Weymouth, Kent and Winchelsea in the House of Commons. In 1611 he was created a baronet, of Eastwell in the County of Kent.

Nicholas Throckmorton 16th-century English diplomat and politician

Sir Nicholas Throckmorton was an English diplomat and politician, who was an ambassador to France and later Scotland, and played a key role in the relationship between Elizabeth I of England and Mary, Queen of Scots.

Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden

Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden was a soldier and courtier in England and an early member of the House of Commons. He was the son of Lancastrian loyalists, Sir William Vaux of Harrowden and Katherine Penyson, a lady of the household of Queen Margaret of Anjou, wife of the Lancastrian king, Henry VI of England. Katherine was daughter of Gregorio Panizzone of Courticelle, in Piedmont, Italy which was at that time subject to King René of Anjou, father of Queen Margaret of Anjou, as ruler of Provence. He grew up during the years of Yorkist rule, and later served under the founder of the Tudor dynasty, Henry VII.

Sir John Ernle was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1654 and 1695. He was one of the longest-serving Chancellors of the Exchequer of England, a position he held from 2 May 1676 to 9 April 1689.

Events from the 1570s in England.

Francis Bacon was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1645 and 1660. He supported the Parliamentary cause in the English Civil War.

George Throckmorton 16th-century English politician

Sir George Throckmorton of Coughton Court in Warwickshire, England, was a Member of Parliament during the reign of King Henry VIII.

Francis Conyngham, 2nd Baron Conyngham was an Irish peer and politician.

Clement Throckmorton (died 1573) English politician

Clement Throckmorton was an English landowner and Member of Parliament in the middle years of the 16th century.

Robert Throckmorton

Sir Robert Throckmorton, KG, of Coughton Court in Warwickshire, was a Member of Parliament and a distinguished English courtier. His public career was impeded by remaining a Roman Catholic.

John Arundell, 2nd Baron Arundell of Trerice

John Arundell, 2nd Baron Arundell of Trerice of Trerice, Cornwall, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1666 and 1687 when he inherited his peerage.

Sir Nicholas Slanning, 1st Baronet

Sir Nicholas Slanning, 1st Baronet FRS of Maristow in the parish of Tamerton Foliot, Devon, was an English courtier and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1667 and 1689.

Sir Clement Throckmorton was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1656 and 1663.

Sir Baynham Throckmorton, 3rd Baronet

Sir Baynham Throckmorton, 3rd Baronet of Clearwell, Gloucestershire was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1656 and 1679.

Sir Thomas Biggs was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1604.

Robert Hopton (c.1575-1638) was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons in two parliaments between 1604 and 1622.

Sir Nicholas Throckmorton or Carew was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons in two parliaments between 1601 and 1622.

Sir Clement Throckmorton was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1624 and 1626.

Clement Throckmorton may refer to: