Thrust Air 2000

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Dodonpa at Fuji-Q Highland Dodonpa rollercoaster 2005-05.JPG
Dodonpa at Fuji-Q Highland

A Thrust Air 2000 (commonly known as a thrust air coaster) is a unique form of launched roller-coaster created by S&S Worldwide, Inc., that uses refrigerated, compressed air to shoot a rubber-wheeled car down a steel track. Do-Dodonpa, located at Fuji-Q Highland, is the only production model in existence. It was built by S&S Worldwide of Logan Utah. It was once the fastest roller coaster in the world and still holds the record of the world's fastest acceleration on a roller coaster. Another model, the Hypersonic XLC, was opened at Kings Dominion in 2001, but it was later closed and put up for sale in 2007. Both models were fabricated by Intermountain Lift, Inc. [1]

Contents

Prototype

The prototype Thrust Air 2000 was made in 1999 at the S&S Power plant in Utah.

Stats

See also

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References

  1. "Amusement". Intermountain Lift, Inc. July 30, 2011. Archived from the original on November 8, 2014. Retrieved September 5, 2014.