Tieton River

Last updated
Tieton River
North Fork Tieton River
Tieton-River.jpg
Country United States
State Washington
Region Yakima County
Tributaries
 - rightSouth Fork Tieton River
SourceNorth Fork Tieton River
 - locationCascade Range, McCall Glacier, Goat Rocks Wilderness
 - elevation6,246 ft (1,904 m) [1]
 - coordinates 46°30′27″N121°26′11″W / 46.50750°N 121.43639°W / 46.50750; -121.43639   [2]
Mouth Naches River
 - elevation1,601 ft (488 m) [1]
 - coordinates 46°44′46″N120°47′12″W / 46.74611°N 120.78667°W / 46.74611; -120.78667 Coordinates: 46°44′46″N120°47′12″W / 46.74611°N 120.78667°W / 46.74611; -120.78667   [3]
Length33 mi (53 km) [3] [2]
USA Washington relief location map.jpg
Red pog.svg
Mouth of the Tieton River in Washington

The Tieton River is a tributary of the Naches River, in Yakima County, Washington in the United States.

Tributary stream or river that flows into a main stem river or lake

A tributary or affluent is a stream or river that flows into a larger stream or main stem river or a lake. A tributary does not flow directly into a sea or ocean. Tributaries and the main stem river drain the surrounding drainage basin of its surface water and groundwater, leading the water out into an ocean.

Naches River river in the United States of America

The Naches River is a tributary of the Yakima River in central Washington in the United States. Beginning as the Little Naches River, it is about 75 miles (121 km) long. After the confluence of the Little Naches and Bumping River the name becomes simply the Naches River. The Naches and its tributaries drain a portion of the eastern side of the Cascade Range, east of Mount Rainier and northeast of Mount Adams. In terms of discharge, the Naches River is the largest tributary of the Yakima River.

Yakima County, Washington County in the United States

Yakima County is a county in the U.S. state of Washington. As of the 2010 census, its population was 243,231. The county seat and largest city is Yakima. The county was formed out of Ferguson County in January 1865 and is named for the Yakama tribe of Native Americans.

Contents

The Tieton River begins in two forks, the North Fork Tieton River and South Fork Tieton River. The North Fork originates at McCall Glacier on the eastern sides of Old Snowy Mountain, Ives Peak, and the Goat Rocks for which the Goat Rocks Wilderness is named. Collecting headwater streams from other high mountains such as Tieton Peak, the North Fork flows northeast into Clear Lake, then into the west end of Rimrock Lake. The South Fork Tieton River begins at Meade Glacier on the eastern side of Gilbert Peak, also part of the Goat Rocks. The South Fork collects many streams as it flows generally north, entering Rimrock Lake near its east end.

McCall Glacier (Washington) glacier in the United States

McCall Glacier is located in the Goat Rocks region in the U.S. state of Washington. The glacier is near to the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail and in the Goat Rocks Wilderness of Snoqualmie National Forest, .60 mi (0.97 km) southeast of Old Snowy Mountain. Packwood Glacier is .50 mi (0.80 km) to the west. Consisting of numerous small bodies of ice, the largest section of McCall Glacier is immediately east of Ives Peak.

Old Snowy Mountain mountain in United States of America

Old Snowy Mountain is located in the Goat Rocks on the border of Lewis and Yakima Counties, in the U.S. state of Washington. Old Snowy Mountain is within the Goat Rocks Wilderness in Gifford Pinchot National Forest and is flanked by the McCall Glacier on its eastern slopes while the smaller Packwood Glacier is just northwest of the peak. Additionally, the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail is on the west slopes of the peak.

Ives Peak mountain in United States of America

Ives Peak, elevation 7,920+ ft, is located in the Goat Rocks on the border of Lewis and Yakima Counties, in the U.S. state of Washington. Ives Peak is within the Goat Rocks Wilderness and the McCall Glacier on its eastern slopes. Additionally, the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail is near the west slopes of the peak.

Rimrock Lake is an artificial reservoir created by Tieton Dam and managed by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. The lake stores water for irrigation use as part of the Bureau of Reclamation's Yakima Project. [4] The Tieton River proper flows out of Rimrock Lake at Tieton Dam. It flows generally east, joining the Naches River near the town of Tieton.

Reservoir A storage space for fluids

A reservoir is, most commonly, an enlarged natural or artificial lake, pond or impoundment created using a dam or lock to store water.

Tieton Dam

Tieton Dam is an earth and concrete type dam on the Tieton River in Yakima County, in the U.S. state of Washington. The dam began operation in 1925. Its reservoir, Rimrock Lake, has a total capacity of 203,600 acre feet (0.2511 km3) with a normal operating capacity of 198,000 acre feet (0.244 km3) to provides water for agricultural irrigation. This dam is a component of the Yakima Project. Upstream from the dam, the river is impounded by Clear Creek Dam, another element of the Yakima Project. About 8 miles (13 km) downstream from the dam, the Tieton River is tapped for the Tieton Main Canal.

United States Bureau of Reclamation government agency

The United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and formerly the United States Reclamation Service, is a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, which oversees water resource management, specifically as it applies to the oversight and operation of the diversion, delivery, and storage projects that it has built throughout the western United States for irrigation, water supply, and attendant hydroelectric power generation. Currently the USBR is the largest wholesaler of water in the country, bringing water to more than 31 million people, and providing one in five Western farmers with irrigation water for 10 million acres of farmland, which produce 60% of the nation's vegetables and 25% of its fruits and nuts. The USBR is also the second largest producer of hydroelectric power in the western United States.

See also

U.S. Route 12 is a major east-west U.S. Highway, running from Aberdeen, Washington, to Detroit, Michigan. It spans 430.80 miles (693.31 km) across the state of Washington, and is the only numbered highway to span the entire state from west to east, starting near the Pacific Ocean, and crossing the Idaho state line near Clarkston. It crosses the Cascade Range over White Pass, south of Mount Rainier National Park. Portions of it are concurrent with Interstate 5 (I-5) and Interstate 82 (I-82), although the majority of the route does not parallel any Interstate Highway.

White Pass (Washington)

White Pass is a mountain pass in the northwest United States, located in the Cascade Range of Washington, southeast of Mount Rainier and north of Goat Rocks. U.S. Highway 12 travels over White Pass, connecting Yakima County on the east with Lewis County.

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Goat Rocks mountain in United States of America

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Moses Lake lake in Washington

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Rimrock

Rimrock is the sheer rock wall at the upper edge of a plateau, canyon, or geological uplift. It may refer to either the rock formation or to the rock itself. Rimrock may be composed of almost any stone—basalt, gneiss, granite, sandstone, etc.—and is frequently layered. Many times it overlays a softer stone which erodes away underneath. American Indians in the West often used cavities found below rimrock to construct dwellings and granaries.

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Bumping River river in the United States of America

The Bumping River is a tributary of the Naches River, in Washington in the United States. It flows down the east side of the Cascade Range, through Wenatchee National Forest and the William O. Douglas Wilderness. From its source at Fish Lake near Crag Mountain, it flows northeast to Bumping Lake, a natural lake enlarged and regulated by Bumping Lake Dam. Below the dam, the Bumping River continues flowing northeast. It is joined by the American River, its main tributary, a few miles above its mouth where it joins the Little Naches River to form the Naches River.

American River (Washington) tributary of the Bumping River

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Rimrock Lake

Rimrock Lake is a lake along the course of the Tieton River, in Yakima County, Washington state, US.

Kachess Lake lake in the United States of America

Kachess Lake is a lake and reservoir along the course of the Kachess River in Washington state, US. The upper part of the lake, north of a narrows, is called Little Kachess Lake. The Kachess River flows into the lake from the north, and out from the south. Kachess Lake is the middle of the three large lakes which straddle Interstate 90 north of the Yakima River in the Cascade Range. The other two are Cle Elum Lake, the easternmost which is also north of I-90 and Keechelus Lake, the westernmost, which is south of I-90.

Kachess River river in the United States of America

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Foss River river in the United States of America

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Rimrock, Washington Unincorporated community in Washington, United States

Rimrock is an unincorporated community in Yakima County, Washington, United States, located approximately 22 miles west of Yakima on the Tieton River, adjacent to Rimrock Lake.

Mount Aix mountain in United States of America

Mount Aix is a 7,766 feet (2,367 m) mountain summit centrally located in the William O. Douglas Wilderness on land administered by the Wenatchee National Forest and is the highest point in that wilderness area. It is also 24 miles east-southeast of Mount Rainier in Yakima County of Washington state. Mount Aix is situated east of the crest of the Cascade Range, southeast of Bumping Lake, north of Bismarck Peak, and northwest of Rimrock Lake. Its nearest higher peak is Tieton Peak in the Goat Rocks Wilderness, 19.9 mi (32.0 km) to the south-southwest. Mount Aix is the highest peak in the entire region which is east of Mount Rainier National Park, north of Goat Rocks Wilderness, west of Yakima, and south of Mount Daniel, so it is quite prominent. Prior to 1897 the name was spelled as Mount Aiks on early survey maps and publications.

References

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.