Timeline of women's basketball

Last updated

Contents

1881–1890

1885

1891–1900

1891

1892

1893

1894

1895

1896

1897

1899

1901–1910

1904

1906

1911–1920

1913

1914

1915

1916

1918

1921–1930

[21] 1921

1926

1927

1931–1940

1932

1936

Uniform worn by the All American Red Heads Team All American Red Heads uniform.jpg
Uniform worn by the All American Red Heads Team

1938

1941–1950

1947

1949

1951–1960

1951

1953

Gold—USA
Silver—Chile
Bronze—France

1955

1957

Gold—USA
Silver—Soviet Union
Bronze—Czechoslovakia

1958

1959

Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Bulgaria
Bronze—Czechoslovakia

1961–1970

1962

1964

Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Czechoslovakia
Bronze—Bulgaria

1966

1967

Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Korea
Bronze—Czechoslovakia

1968

1969

Nera White Nera White.jpg
Nera White

1970

1971–1980

1971

Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Czechoslovakia
Bronze—Brazil

1972

1973

1974

1975

Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Japan
Bronze—Czechoslovakia

1976

Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—USA
Bronze—Bulgaria

1977

1978

1979

Gold—USA
Silver—Korea
Bronze—Canada

1980

Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Bulgaria
Bronze—Yugoslavia

1981–1990

1981

1982

Louisiana Tech-1982 National Champions 1982 Louisiana Tech women's basketball team.jpg
Louisiana Tech–1982 National Champions

1983

Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—USA
Bronze—Chile

1984

Gold—USA
Silver—Korea
Bronze—China

1985

1986

Texas, the 1986 National Championship team, in front of the main tower, lit up with #1 1986 natl champ tower s001.jpg
Texas, the 1986 National Championship team, in front of the main tower, lit up with #1
Gold—USA
Silver—Soviet Union
Bronze—Canada

1987

1988

Gold—USA
Silver—Yugoslavia
Bronze—Soviet Union

1989

1990

Stanford Cardinal team with National Championship Trophy Team040490 01JG.jpg
Stanford Cardinal team with National Championship Trophy
Gold—USA
Silver—Yugoslavia
Bronze—Cuba

1991–2000

1991

1992

Gold—Com. of Independent States(CIS)
Silver—China
Bronze—USA

1993

1994

Gold—Brazil
Silver—China
Bronze—Cuba

1995

1996

Gold—USA
Silver—Brazil
Bronze—Australia

1997

Tina Thompson, first player chosen in the WNBA draft Tina Thompson cropped.jpg
Tina Thompson, first player chosen in the WNBA draft

1998

Gold—USA
Silver—Russia
Bronze—Australia

1999

2000

Gold—USA
Silver—Australia
Bronze—Brazil

2001–2010

2001

2002

Gold—USA
Silver—Russia
Bronze—Australia

2003

2004

Gold—USA
Silver—Australia
Bronze—Russia

2005

2006

Australia women's national basketball team, celebrating after being awarded the gold medals for winning the 2006 FIBA World Championship for Women in basketball 2006 World Championship for Women Australia.jpg
Australia women's national basketball team, celebrating after being awarded the gold medals for winning the 2006 FIBA World Championship for Women in basketball
Gold—Australia
Silver—Russia
Bronze—USA

2007

2008

Gold—USA
Silver—Australia
Bronze—Russia

2009

The players, coaches, and other staff of the 2008-2009 UConn Huskies, winners of the 2009 national championship UConn Team At White House 2009.jpg
The players, coaches, and other staff of the 2008–2009 UConn Huskies, winners of the 2009 national championship

2010

Gold—USA
Silver—Czech Republic
Bronze—Spain

2011–2020

2011

2012

Gold—USA
Silver—France
Bronze—Australia

2013

2014

Gold—USA
Silver—Spain
Bronze—Australia
This was the last event known as the "FIBA World Championship for Women". Shortly after the 2014 edition, the competition was renamed the FIBA Women's Basketball World Cup. [114]

2015

2016

Gold—USA
Silver—Spain
Bronze—Serbia

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021–2030

2021

2022

2023

2024

See also

Notes

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  5. 1 2 Porter 2005 , p. 1
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  10. Porter 2005 , p. 20
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  12. Grundy 2005 , p. 19
  13. Miller 2002 , p. 29
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  31. "1957 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012.
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  54. Porter 2006 , p. 13
  55. 1 2 Hult & Trekell 1991 , p. 320
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  68. Pennington 1998 , p. 318
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  71. "1990 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012.
  72. "1992 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012.
  73. "1994 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012.
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