Parade (magazine)

Last updated
Parade
Parade magazine cover 9-6-09.jpg
September 6, 2009 issue
EditorAnne Krueger
FrequencyWeekly (Sundays)
Circulation 32 million
Publisher Athlon Media Group
Founder Marshall Field III
Year founded1941
Country United States
Website parade.com
OCLC number 1772138

Parade is an American nationwide Sunday newspaper magazine, distributed in more than 700 newspapers in the United States. [1] It was founded in 1941 and is owned by Athlon Media Group, which purchased it from Advance Publications. The most widely read magazine in the U.S., Parade has a circulation of 32 million and a readership of 54.1 million. [2]  As of 2015, its editor is Anne Krueger. [3]

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

A Sunday magazine is a publication inserted into a Sunday newspaper. It also has been known as a Sunday supplement, Sunday newspaper magazine or Sunday magazine section. Traditionally, the articles in these magazines cover a wide range of subjects, and the content is not as current and timely as the rest of the newspaper.

Athlon Media Group, also known as Athlon Sports or simply Athlon, is a publisher founded in 1967 that is based in Nashville, Tennessee. Nashville's Spencer Hays is its majority stockholder.

Contents

Overview

Parade is printed on newsprint, although usually a higher quality of newsprint than the rest of the newspapers it accompanies but of lesser quality than magazine paper.

Newsprint low-cost non-archival paper consisting mainly of wood pulp and most commonly used to print newspapers

Newsprint is a low-cost, non-archival paper consisting mainly of wood pulp and most commonly used to print newspapers and other publications and advertising material. Invented in 1844 by Charles Fenerty of Nova Scotia, Canada, it usually has an off white cast and distinctive feel. It is designed for use in printing presses that employ a long web of paper rather than individual sheets of paper.

The magazine has one main feature article, often a smaller feature article, and a number of regular columns. There is also a significant amount of advertising for consumer products, some with clipable coupons or tear-off business reply cards.

Publishing history

The magazine was started by Marshall Field III in 1941 as a weekly magazine supplement for his own paper (the Chicago Sun ) and for others in the United States. By 1946, Parade had achieved a circulation of 3.5 million.

Marshall Field III American investment banker, publisher, racehorse owner, and philanthropist

Marshall Field III was an American investment banker, publisher, racehorse owner/breeder, philanthropist, grandson of businessman Marshall Field, heir to the Marshall Field department store fortune, and a leading financial supporter and founding board member of Saul Alinsky's community organizing network Industrial Areas Foundation.

John Hay Whitney, publisher of the New York Herald Tribune , bought Parade in 1958. Booth Newspapers purchased it in 1973. Booth was purchased by Advance Publications in 1976, and Parade became a separate operating unit within Advance. [4]

John Hay "Jock" Whitney was U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom, publisher of the New York Herald Tribune, and president of the Museum of Modern Art. He was a member of the Whitney family.

<i>New York Herald Tribune</i> newspaper

The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper published between 1924 and 1966. It was created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. It was widely regarded as a "writer's newspaper" and competed with The New York Times in the daily morning market. The paper won at least nine Pulitzer Prizes during its lifetime.

Booth Newspapers, or Booth Michigan, was a media company based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Booth owned eight newspapers in the state of Michigan. Founded by George Gough Booth with his two brothers, Booth Newspapers was sold to Advance Publications, which purchased it in 1976 for $305 million, a record at the time.

Parade Digital Partners is a distribution network that includes the web site Parade.com and over 700 of the magazine's partner newspaper web sites. Parade Digital Partners has a reach of more than 30 million monthly unique visitors (comScore Q1 2014).

Throughout 2016, Gannett Company, which had produced USA Weekend , the most direct competitor to Parade until its December 2014 discontinuation, added (or in most cases, re-added) Parade to many of its Sunday newspapers as a replacement.

<i>USA Weekend</i>

USA Weekend is a defunct American weekend newspaper magazine that was owned by the Gannett Company. Structured as a sister publication to Gannett's flagship newspaper USA Today and distributed in the Sunday editions of participating local newspapers, it was the second largest national magazine supplement in the United States, and was distributed to more than 800 newspapers nationwide at its peak.

Features

Marilyn vos Savant US American magazine columnist, author and lecturer

Marilyn vos Savant is an American magazine columnist, author, lecturer, and playwright. She was listed as having the highest recorded intelligence quotient (IQ) in the Guinness Book of Records, a competitive category the publication has since retired. Since 1986, she has written "Ask Marilyn", a Parade magazine Sunday column where she solves puzzles and answers questions on various subjects. Among them was a discussion of the Monty Hall problem, to which she postulated an answer in 1990.

Dave Coverly is the creator of the single-panel comic Speed Bump.

Dan Piraro American cartoonist, painter, writer, and performer

Daniel Charles "Dan" Piraro is a painter, illustrator, and cartoonist best known for his syndicated cartoon panel Bizarro. Piraro's cartoons have been reprinted in 16 book collections. He has also written three books of prose.

Special editions

Publishing lag time

The magazine has a lag time to publication of about ten days, which has caused the magazine to print statements that were out-of-date by the time Parade was publicly available in a weekend newspaper.

The January 6, 2008 edition cover and main article asked whether Benazir Bhutto was "America's best hope against Al-Qaeda," after her December 27, 2007 assassination. [11] In response to reader and media [12] [13] complaints (and besides individual newspapers noting the discrepancy to prevent reader confusion), Parade stated on their website:

"Dear Parade Readers, Parade publishes more than 32 million copies of each issue and distributes them to 415 newspapers across the country. In order to meet our printing, distribution and insertion deadlines, we must send the issue to the printer three weeks before the cover date. Our Benazir Bhutto issue, for example, went to press on Dec. 19. By the time Ms. Bhutto was slain on Dec. 27, this issue of Parade was already printed and shipped to our partner newspapers. Recalling, reprinting and redistributing our January 6 issue was not an option." [14]

A similar incident occurred in the February 11, 2007 issue when Walter Scott's "Personality Parade" reported that Barbaro, an American thoroughbred racehorse and winner of the 2006 Kentucky Derby, was in a stable condition. Barbaro was euthanized thirteen days earlier, on January 29, 2007. [15]

On April 27, 2014, Walter Scott's "Personality Parade" reported that Joby Ogwyn would BASE jump in a wingsuit from the summit of Mount Everest live on the Discovery Channel in May 2014. However, before the edition appeared in print, the government of Nepal closed Mount Everest to climbers because of an avalanche on April 18, 2014 that killed 16 Sherpas, including five Sherpas working for the Discovery Channel in advance of Ogwyn's planned jump, hastening the cancellation of the special.

Related Research Articles

Benazir Bhutto 11th Prime Minister of Pakistan

Benazir Bhutto was a Pakistani politician who served as Prime Minister of Pakistan from 1988 to 1990 and again from 1993 to 1996. She was the first woman to head a democratic government in a Muslim majority nation. Ideologically a liberal and a secularist, she chaired or co-chaired the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) from the early 1980s until her assassination in 2007.

Monty Hall game show host

Monty Hall was a Canadian-American game show host, producer, and philanthropist.

<i>Boys Life</i>

Boys' Life is the monthly magazine of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). Its target readers are between the ages of 6 and 18. The magazine headquarters are in Irving, Texas.

<i>Highlights for Children</i>

Highlights for Children, often referred to simply as Highlights, is an American children's magazine. It began publication in June 1946, started by Garry Cleveland Myers and his wife Caroline Clark Myers in Honesdale, Pennsylvania. They both worked for another children's magazine, Children's Activities, for 12 years before leaving to start Highlights. Since its inception Highlights has carried the slogan "Fun with a Purpose".

<i>The New York Times Magazine</i>

The New York Times Magazine is a Sunday magazine supplement included with the Sunday edition of The New York Times. It is host to feature articles longer than those typically in the newspaper and has attracted many notable contributors. The magazine is also noted for its photography, especially relating to fashion and style.

The Muskegon Chronicle is a daily newspaper in Muskegon, Michigan, owned by Booth newspapers. In May 2007, the paper celebrated 150 years.

GAMES World Of Puzzles is a puzzle magazine formed from the merge of Games and World of Puzzles in October 2014.

St. Nicholas Magazine was a popular monthly American children's magazine, founded by Scribner's in 1873. The first editor was Mary Mapes Dodge, who continued her association with the magazine until her death in 1905. Dodge published work by the country's best writers, including Louisa May Alcott, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Mark Twain, Laura E. Richards and Joel Chandler Harris. Many famous writers were first published in St. Nicholas League, a department that offered awards and cash prizes to the best work submitted by its juvenile readers. Edna St. Vincent Millay, F. Scott Fitzgerald, E. B. White, and Stephen Vincent Benet were all St. Nicholas League winners.

The Boy or Girl paradox surrounds a set of questions in probability theory which are also known as The Two Child Problem, Mr. Smith's Children and the Mrs. Smith Problem. The initial formulation of the question dates back to at least 1959, when Martin Gardner published one of the earliest variants of the paradox in Scientific American. Titled The Two Children Problem, he phrased the paradox as follows:

BBC MindGames was a British magazine devoted to puzzles, brainteasers and articles concerning the mind. It was published every four weeks. Its name was taken from the BBC Four show, Mind Games.

Monty Hall problem A probability puzzle

The Monty Hall problem is a brain teaser, in the form of a probability puzzle, loosely based on the American television game show Let's Make a Deal and named after its original host, Monty Hall. The problem was originally posed in a letter by Steve Selvin to the American Statistician in 1975, . It became famous as a question from a reader's letter quoted in Marilyn vos Savant's "Ask Marilyn" column in Parade magazine in 1990 :

Suppose you're on a game show, and you're given the choice of three doors: Behind one door is a car; behind the others, goats. You pick a door, say No. 1, and the host, who knows what's behind the doors, opens another door, say No. 3, which has a goat. He then says to you, "Do you want to pick door No. 2?" Is it to your advantage to switch your choice?

<i>New York Graphic</i>

The New York Evening Graphic was a tabloid newspaper published from 1924 to 1932 by Bernarr "Bodylove" Macfadden. Exploitative and mendacious in its short life, the "pornoGraphic" defined tabloid journalism, launching the careers of Walter Winchell, Louis Sobol, and sportswriter-turned-television host Ed Sullivan.

Akins High School

Akins High School is located in South Austin, Texas, United States. It was named after Dr. William Charles Akins, an Austin resident and founded in 2000. It is one of the newest high schools in the Austin Independent School District. Its current attendance exceeds 2,500 students. Akins High School competes on the 6A circuit in all of its UIL competitions.

Hidato logic puzzle

Hidato, also known as "Hidoku", is a logic puzzle game invented by Dr. Gyora M. Benedek, an Israeli mathematician. The goal of Hidato is to fill the grid with consecutive numbers that connect horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. The name Hidato is a registered trademark of Doo-Bee Toys and Games LTD, a company co-founded by Benebek himself. Some publishers use different names for this puzzle such as Number Snake, Snakepit, Jadium or Numbrix.

<i>Chums</i> (paper)

Chums was a boys' weekly newspaper started in 1892 by Cassell & Company and later, from 1927, published by Amalgamated Press. The publisher gathered the weekly paper into monthly and annual editions. The serial ceased publication in 1941.

The Cleveland Jewish News is a weekly Jewish newspaper headquartered in Beachwood, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland. The newspaper contains local, national, and international news of Jewish interest.

"Walter Scott's Personality Parade" is a column in Parade magazine featuring celebrity gossip. As of 2001 Edward Klein is the author of the column, which is in the inside cover of the magazine.

References

  1. "About Us - Parade Magazine". 2013-06-03. Archived from the original on December 12, 2008. Retrieved 2016-08-26.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  2. GfK MRI Fall l2013; comScore, Q1 2014, Parade Media Group [E]: circulation: January 2014 AAM, CAC, VAC & Publishers' Statements 9/30/2013
  3. "Athlon Names New 'Parade' Editor". Nashville Post. Jan 9, 2015. Retrieved 8 June 2015.
  4. Ping Shaw (1999). "Internationalization of the women's magazine industry in Taiwan context, process and influence". Asian Journal of Communication. 9 (2): 17–38. doi:10.1080/01292989909359623.
  5. Clodfelter, Tim (March 15, 2016). "SAM". Winston-Salem Journal . Retrieved April 7, 2016.
  6. Huff, Doug. "EA SPORTS Boys & Girls All-Americans". yahoo.com. Archived from the original on March 15, 2015.
  7. "Felder signs with Lady Bulldogs". Athens Banner-Herald. April 13, 2000. Archived from the original on March 15, 2015.
  8. Cohen, Haskell (January 14, 1979). "Parade's First All-America High School Soccer Team". Parade. p. 20. Retrieved March 15, 2015.
  9. "Named to the PARADE All-American team". milton.edu. June 2003. Archived from the original on May 28, 2010.
  10. Woo, Elaine (2001-05-26). "Lloyd Shearer; Leader of the 'Personality Parade'". Los Angeles Times . Retrieved 4 February 2014.
  11. Archived September 8, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  12. Leventis, Angie. "Featured Articles From The Chicago Tribune". Archives.chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 2013-10-13.
  13. "'Parade' Interview Fails to Note Bhutto's Death". NPR. 2008-01-06. Retrieved 2013-10-13.
  14. Archived January 10, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  15. Archived November 12, 2008, at the Wayback Machine