Chicago Sky

Last updated
Chicago Sky
Basketball current event.svg 2023 Chicago Sky season
Chicago Sky logo.svg
Conference Eastern
Leagues WNBA
FoundedFebruary 8, 2005;17 years ago (2005-02-08) [1]
HistoryChicago Sky
2006–present
Arena Wintrust Arena [2] [3]
Location Chicago, Illinois
Team colorsSky blue, radiant yellow, black, white [4] [5] [6]
    
General manager James Wade
Head coach James Wade
Assistant(s) Tonya Edwards
Ann Wauters
Emre Vatansever
Ownership Michael J. Alter
Margaret Stender
Michelle Williams
Mathew Knowles [7]
Championships1 (2021)
Conference titles1 (2014) [note 1]
Website sky.wnba.com
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Heroine
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Kit body basketball.svg
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Explorer
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Rebel

The Chicago Sky are an American professional basketball team based in Chicago. The Sky compete in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) as a member club of the league's Eastern Conference. The franchise was founded prior to the 2006 season. The Sky experienced a period of success from 2013 to 2016, making four playoff appearances and playing in the 2014 WNBA Finals. They experienced a second period of success starting in 2019 and won their first championship in the 2021 WNBA Finals.

Contents

The team is owned by Michael J. Alter (principal owner) and Margaret Stender (minority owner). Unlike many other WNBA teams, it is not affiliated with a National Basketball Association (NBA) counterpart, although the Chicago Bulls play in the same market.

Franchise history

Franchise origin

In February 2005, NBA Commissioner David Stern announced that Chicago had been awarded a new WNBA franchise, temporarily named WNBA Chicago. On May 27, 2005, former NBA player and coach Dave Cowens was announced as the team's first head coach and general manager. The team home would be the UIC Pavilion. On September 20, 2005, the team name and logo formally debuted at an introduction event held at the Adler Planetarium. Team President and CEO Margaret Stender explained the team colors of yellow and blue represent "[a] beautiful day in Chicago between the blue sky and bright sunlight to highlight the spectacular skyline." The event was highlighted by the appearance of several star players, including Diana Taurasi, Temeka Johnson, Sue Bird, and Ruth Riley.[ citation needed ]

In November 2005, the team held an expansion draft to help build its roster of players. Among the notable selections were Brooke Wyckoff from the Connecticut Sun, Bernadette Ngoyisa from the San Antonio Silver Stars, Elaine Powell from the Detroit Shock, and Stacey Dales (who had retired prior to the 2005 season) from the Washington Mystics.

On February 28, 2006, the team announced that two of the minority shareholders of the team are Michelle Williams, from the vocal group Destiny's Child, and Mathew Knowles, father of Destiny's Child lead singer Beyoncé Knowles. [8]

Early years and limited success (2006–2012)

In their first season, the Sky achieved a 5–29 record and finished last in the Eastern Conference. After the season, head coach Dave Cowens resigned to join the coaching staff of the Detroit Pistons. [9] University of Missouri-Kansas City women's head basketball coach Bo Overton was named the Sky's new head coach and general manager on December 12, 2006. [10] The Sky once again recorded a league-worst 5–29 record in 2006. Despite having the highest odds of drawing the first pick in the 2007 WNBA draft lottery, the Sky ended up with the third overall pick, which they used to select Armintie Price. The team was vastly improved in the 2007 season, but still finished with a 14–20 record and were two games behind the final playoff spot in the Eastern Conference. Price was named the 2007 WNBA Rookie of the Year. On March 12, 2008, the Sky announced that Overton had resigned his position of coach/general manager. Assistant coach Steven Key was named head coach/general manager.

Sylvia Fowles Sylvia Fowles WNBA.jpg
Sylvia Fowles

With the second overall pick in the 2008 WNBA draft, the Sky selected Sylvia Fowles. In the 2008 season, the Sky would once again fail to make the playoffs, posting a 12–22 record, finishing 5th in the East. Fowles was injured for most of the season (she was, however, selected to play on the winning U.S. team at the 2008 Summer Olympics, where she average 13.4 points and 8.4 rebounds per game). In the 2009 WNBA draft, the Sky selected point guard Kristi Toliver with the third overall pick. Toliver had recently won the NCAA Women's Basketball Championship with the University of Maryland, where she had shot a game-tying three-point basket to send the game into overtime. In the 2009 season, the Sky contended for a playoff position, but finished with a record of 16-18 and lost a three-team tiebreaker to the Washington Mystics for the final playoff position.

2011 home uniform, manufactured by Adidas Chicago Sky uniform 2011.jpg
2011 home uniform, manufactured by Adidas

Entering the 2010 season, the Sky moved to Allstate Arena in the suburb of Rosemont, Illinois. The team's roster underwent several changes, highlighted by the trading away of Candice Dupree and Kristi Toliver and the acquisition of Shameka Christon and Cathrine Kraayeveld. At one point during the season, they were at .500, just a few games back for the final playoff spot. However, they lost eight of their final ten games and were eliminated from playoff contention, finishing with a 14–20 record. Key resigned as GM and coach, and was replaced on October 28, 2010, by former LSU head coach Pokey Chatman. [11]

In 2011, the Sky were led again by Fowles, who averaged a double-double (20 points and 10.2 rebounds per game). The Sky once again finished the season at 14-20 but were encouraged by going 10-7 at home. [12] The Sky selected Shey Peddy with the 23rd pick and Sydney Carter with the 27th pick in the 2012 WNBA draft. Peddy and Carter were both eventually waived on May 14, 2012. [13] The Sky began the 2012 season 7-1, but finished 14–20 for the third consecutive season. [14] The Sky remained the only WNBA franchise to never make the playoffs.

Playoff runs (2013–2016)

The 2013 season was a turning point for the Sky. In the draft, they selected Elena Delle Donne with the second overall pick. Delle Donne became the first rookie to lead All-Star voting, averaging 18.1 points per game (fourth in the league) and leading the Sky to a 24-10 record and first place in the Eastern Conference. Delle Donne was named Rookie of the Year, Fowles was named Defensive Player of the Year and led the league in rebounds, and teammate Swin Cash received the Kim Perrot Sportsmanship Award. Chatman finished a close second for Coach of the Year, Delle Donne narrowly missed the MVP award, and Fowles and Delle Donne were named to the All-WNBA first and second teams. Reaching the playoffs for the first time, the Sky lost in the conference semifinals to the Indiana Fever.

In the 2014 season, the Sky posted an unimpressive 15-19 regular season record, but qualified for the playoffs as the 4th seed in the Eastern Conference. Guard Allie Quigley, who had grown up in nearby Joliet, Illinois, was named Sixth Woman of the Year. In the playoffs, they won two best-of-three series in the conference semifinals and finals to reach the WNBA Finals for the first time. In the best-of-five series, they were swept by the Phoenix Mercury in three games.

In February 2015, the Sky acquired Chicago native Cappie Pondexter from the New York Liberty in a straight-up trade for Epiphanny Prince. At the end of the 2015 season, they posted a 23-11 record and earned second place in the Eastern Conference. Delle Donne was named the league's Most Valuable Player, point guard Courtney Vandersloot led the league in assists, and Quigley was once again named Sixth Woman of the Year. Despite their improved regular season performance, the Sky fell to the Indiana Fever in the conference semifinals.

In the 2016 season, under the WNBA's new playoff format where teams were seeded regardless of conference, the Sky finished 4th in the league and returned to the playoffs, but lost 3-1 in the semifinals to the Los Angeles Sparks.

Rebuilding (2017–2018)

The Sky hired Amber Stocks as head coach and general manager, replacing Chatman, on December 6, 2016. During the 2016–17 offseason, in what was called one of the biggest trades in league history, the Sky traded Delle Donne to the Washington Mystics, receiving Kahleah Copper, Stefanie Dolson, and the Mystics' second overall pick in the 2017 WNBA draft. [15] In the 2017 season, the Sky posted a 12–22 record and missed the playoffs for the first time in five seasons. In the ensuing 2018 WNBA draft, they selected Diamond DeShields and Gabby Williams in the first round. In the 2018 season, they posted a 13–21 record and missed the playoffs for a second consecutive season. On August 31, 2018, the Sky relieved Stocks as head coach and general manager. [16] During these seasons, Courtney Vandersloot led the league in assists (setting a new assists-per-game record in 2017) and Allie Quigley won back-to-back Three-Point Contests at the All-Star Game.

Return to the playoffs and first championship (2019–present)

In November 2018, the Sky hired James Wade as the team's new head coach and general manager. The Sky selected Katie Lou Samuelson in the first round of the 2019 WNBA draft and traded away Alaina Coates. The 2019 season would be a turnaround for the Sky, as they finished with a 20–14 record and entered the playoffs as a fifth seed. Wade received the WNBA Coach of the Year Award for the regular season, and Courtney Vandersloot exceeded her own assists-per-game record for the second straight season. Vandersloot, Allie Quigley, and Diamond DeShields were all named All-Stars, and DeShields won the All-Star Game Skills Challenge. In the playoffs, they defeated the Phoenix Mercury in the first round, but then lost to the Las Vegas Aces on the road on a buzzer-beater in the final seconds.

In the 2020 season, which was shortened and held in a bubble in Bradenton, Florida due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Sky showed promise early in the season but battled injuries and ended the season with a sixth-seeded 12–10 record. They lost a first round single-elimination game to the Phoenix Mercury.

On February 1, 2021, the Sky announced the signing of free agent Candace Parker, a two-time WNBA MVP and WNBA Finals MVP. Parker, who had grown up in Naperville, Illinois and played her first 12 seasons in the league with the Los Angeles Sparks, stated that she wanted to return to her hometown team. [17] The Sky had a volatile 2021 season, including a seven-game losing streak and a seven-game winning streak, which they ended with a 16-16 record. They entered the playoffs as the 6th seed, winning two single-elimination games and a semifinals series against the Connecticut Sun on their way to the Finals. On October 17, 2021, the Sky won their first WNBA Championship after defeating the Phoenix Mercury 3-1 in the 2021 WNBA Finals. Kahleah Copper was named the Finals MVP. A parade and rally to celebrate the team were held on October 19, 2021. [18] Since the new playoff format was adopted, the Sky became the lowest-seeded team and first team without a winning record to win the championship.

Name, logo, and uniforms

Uniforms

Season-by-season records

Table key
AMVP All-Star Game Most Valuable Player
APP Assists Peak Performer
COY Coach of the Year
DPOY Defensive Player of the Year
FMVP Finals Most Valuable Player
MIP Most Improved Player
MVP Most Valuable Player
ROY Rookie of the Year
RPP Rebounding Peak Performer
SIX Sixth Woman of the Year
SPOR Sportsmanship Award
SPP Scoring Peak Performer
WNBA champions Conference championsPlayoff berth
SeasonTeamConference standing (2006-16)

League standing (2016-present)

Regular season Playoff ResultsAwards Head coach
WLPCT
Chicago Sky
2006 2006 East 7th529.147 Dave Cowens
2007 2007 East 6th1420.412 Bo Overton
2008 2008 East 5th1222.353 Steven Key
2009 2009 East 5th1618.471
2010 2010 East 6th1420.412
2011 2011 East 5th1420.412 Sylvia Fowles (DPOY) Pokey Chatman
2012 2012 East 5th1420.412
2013 2013 East 1st2410.706Lost Conference Semifinals (Indiana, 0–2) Elena Delle Donne (ROY)
Sylvia Fowles (DPOY, RPP)
Swin Cash (SPOR)
2014 2014 East 4th1519.441Won Conference Semifinals (Atlanta, 2–1)
Won Conference Finals (Indiana, 2–1)
Lost WNBA Finals (Phoenix, 0–3)
Allie Quigley (SIX)
2015 2015 East 2nd2113.618Lost Conference Semifinals (Indiana, 1–2) Elena Delle Donne (MVP, SPP)
Allie Quigley (SIX)
Courtney Vandersloot (APP)
2016 2016 WNBA [note 2] 4th1816.529Won Second Round (Atlanta, 1–0)
Lost WNBA Semifinals (Los Angeles, 1–3)
2017 2017 WNBA9th1222.353 Courtney Vandersloot (APP) Amber Stocks
2018 2018 WNBA10th1321.382 Courtney Vandersloot (APP)
2019 2019 WNBA5th2014.588Won First Round (Phoenix, 1–0)
Lost Second Round (Las Vegas, 0–1)
James Wade (COY)
Courtney Vandersloot (APP)
James Wade
2020 2020 WNBA6th1210.545Lost First Round (Connecticut, 0–1) Courtney Vandersloot (APP)
2021 2021 WNBA6th1616.500Won First Round (Dallas, 1–0)
Won Second Round (Minnesota, 1–0)
Won Semifinals (Connecticut, 3–1)
Won WNBA Finals (Phoenix, 3–1)
Courtney Vandersloot (APP)
Kahleah Copper (Finals MVP)
2022 2022 WNBA2nd2610.722Won First Round (New York, 2–1)
Lost Semifinals (Connecticut, 2–3)
James Wade (EOY)
Regular season250284.4681 Conference Championships
Playoffs2020.5001 WNBA Championships

Players

Current roster

PlayersCoaches
Pos.No.Nat.NameHeightWeightDOBFromYrs
G 20 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Allemand, Julie 5' 8" (1.73m)147 lb (67kg)1996-07-07 Belgium 1
G/F 2 Flag of the United States.svg Copper, Kahleah 6' 1" (1.85m)165 lb (75kg)1994-08-28 Rutgers 6
G 11 Flag of the United States.svg Evans, Dana 5' 6" (1.68m)145 lb (66kg)1998-08-01 Louisville 1
G 35 Flag of the United States.svg Gardner, Rebekah 6' 1" (1.85m)130 lb (59kg)1990-07-09 UCLA R
F 24 Flag of the United States.svg Hebard, Ruthy 6' 4" (1.93m)190 lb (86kg)1998-04-28 Oregon 2
F 33 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Meesseman, Emma 6' 4" (1.93m)191 lb (87kg)1993-05-13 Belgium 7
F/C 3 Flag of the United States.svg Parker, Candace 6' 4" (1.93m)184 lb (83kg)1986-04-19 Tennessee 14
G 14 Flag of Hungary.svg Quigley, Allie 5' 10" (1.78m)142 lb (64kg)1986-06-20 DePaul 13
F/C 30 Flag of the United States.svg Stevens, Azurá 6' 6" (1.98m)180 lb (82kg)1996-02-01 Connecticut 4
G 22 Flag of Hungary.svg Vandersloot, Courtney 5' 8" (1.73m)137 lb (62kg)1989-02-08 Gonzaga 11
C 28 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Yueru, Li 6' 7" (2.01m)200 lb (91kg)1999-03-28 China R
Head coach
Flag of the United States.svg James Wade (Kennesaw State)
Assistant coaches
Flag of the United States.svg Tonya Edwards (Tennessee)
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Ann Wauters
Flag of Turkey.svg Emre Vatansever
Athletic trainer
Flag of the United States.svg Meghan Lockerby
Strength and conditioning coach
Flag of the United States.svg Ann Crosby

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (DP) Unsigned draft pick
  • (FA) Free agent
  • (S) Suspended
  • Cruz Roja.svg Injured

  WNBA roster page
East
ATL
CHI
CON
IND
NY
WAS
West
DAL
LV
LA
MIN
PHO
SEA

Former players

Coaches and staff

Owners

Head coaches

Chicago Sky head coaches
NameStartEndSeasonsRegular seasonPlayoffs
WLPCTGWLPCTG
Dave Cowens May 25, 2005September 12, 20061529.1473400.0000
Bo Overton December 12, 2006March 12, 200811420.4123400.0000
Steven Key March 12, 2008September 10, 201034260.41210200.0000
Pokey Chatman October 29, 2010October 28, 2016610698.520204712.36819
Amber Stocks December 8, 2016August 31, 201822543.3686800.0000
James Wade November 8, 2018present47450.597124138.61921

General managers

Assistant coaches

Statistics

Chicago Sky statistics
2000s
SeasonIndividualTeam vs Opponents
PPG RPG APG PPG RPG FG%
2006 C. Dupree (13.7) B. Ngoyisa (5.7) J. Perkins (3.2)68.3 vs 79.030.5 vs 36.4.394 vs .452
2007 C. Dupree (16.7) C. Dupree (7.7) D. Canty (4.1)74.3 vs 76.834.3 vs 36.0.406 vs .429
2008 J. Perkins (17.0) C. Dupree (7.9) D. Canty (4.1)72.7 vs 73.833.1 vs 34.1.428 vs .416
2009 C. Dupree (16.7) C. Dupree (7.9) D. Canty (3.2)75.7 vs 79.231.9 vs 34.0.435 vs .442
2010s
SeasonIndividualTeam vs Opponents
PPG RPG APG PPG RPG FG%
2010 S. Fowles (17.8) S. Fowles (9.9) D. Canty (3.4)76.1 vs 76.831.7 vs 33.4.437 vs .444
2011 S. Fowles (20.0) S. Fowles (10.2) C. Vandersloot (3.7)74.2 vs 75.233.8 vs 32.6.438 vs .418
2012 E. Prince (18.1) S. Fowles (10.4) C. Vandersloot (4.6)75.2 vs 75.534.9 vs 30.1.431 vs .429
2013 E. Delle Donne (18.1) S. Fowles (11.5) C. Vandersloot (5.6)79.4 vs 73.637.1 vs 33.2.420 vs .404
2014 E. Delle Donne (17.9) S. Fowles (10.2) C. Vandersloot (5.6)76.2 vs 78.234.1 vs 35.6.434 vs .420
2015 E. Delle Donne (23.4) E. Delle Donne (8.4) C. Vandersloot (5.8)82.9 vs 78.836.6 vs 33.6.446 vs .425
2016 E. Delle Donne (21.5) E. Delle Donne (7.0) C. Vandersloot (4.7)86.2 vs 85.635.6 vs 32.9.462 vs .436
2017 A. Quigley (16.4) J. Breland (6.3) C. Vandersloot (8.1)82.1 vs 87.233.8 vs 36.5.461 vs .435
2018 A. Quigley (15.4) Ch. Parker (5.8) C. Vandersloot (8.6)83.8 vs 90.133.1 vs 36.5.453 vs .462
2019 D. DeShields (16.2) J. Lavender (6.9) C. Vandersloot (9.1)84.6 vs 83.336.4 vs 35.4.448 vs .418
2020s
SeasonIndividualTeam vs Opponents
PPG RPG APG PPG RPG FG%
2020 A. Quigley (15.4) Ch. Parker (6.4) C. Vandersloot (10.0)86.7 vs 84.133.6 vs 32.2.491 vs .453
2021 K. Copper (14.4) Ca. Parker (8.4) C. Vandersloot (8.6)83.3 vs 81.935.0 vs 35.9.441 vs .433
2022 K. Copper (15.7) Ca. Parker (8.6) C. Vandersloot (6.5)86.3 vs 81.334.8 vs 33.2.481 vs .438

Media coverage

Currently, Sky games are broadcast locally in Chicago on WMEU-CD and WCIU-TV. Select Games are available on Marquee Sports Network. 2022 Marquee TV Schedule Select games are also broadcast in South Bend on WMYS-LD. [20] Select games are broadcast nationally on ESPN or NBA TV. Broadcasters for the Sky games are Lisa Byington and Stephen Bardo.

The Sky was on radio for two seasons on WVON-AM 1690 with Les Grobstein on play-by-play and Tajua Catchings (whose sister Tamika Catchings is a star with the Indiana Fever) handling color. After 2008, WVON did not carry games any longer over a financial disagreement, and the Sky has not been on radio since. Their Home game only were carried on line during the 2008 season, but no Radio type play by play has been on since.

All games (excluding blackout games, which are available on ESPN3.com) are broadcast to the WNBA LiveAccess game feeds on the league website. Furthermore, some Sky games are broadcast nationally on ESPN, ESPN2 and ABC. The WNBA has reached an eight-year agreement with ESPN, which will pay right fees to the Sky, as well as other teams in the league. [21]

All-time notes

Regular season attendance

Regular season all-time attendance
YearAverageHighLowSelloutsTotal for yearWNBA game average
20063,390 (14th)5,2192,570057,6357,476
20073,915 (14th)6,9722,505166,5577,742
20083,656 (13th)6,3042,276062,1467,948
20093,933 (13th)5,8812,396066,8558,039
20104,293 (12th)6,9502,408072,9867,834
20115,536 (11th)13,8382,876094,1167,954
20125,573 (10th)13,1612,884094,7467,452
20136,601 (9th)14,2014,1350112,2127,531
20146,685 (9th)16,4023,9580113,6407,578
20156,960 (7th)16,3044,1410118,3227,184
20167,009 (7th)119,1477,665
20176,853 (9th)14,1024,4980116,5017,716
20186,358 (6th)10,0244,1310108,0916,721
20196,749 (6th)10,1434,2120114,7276,535
2020Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the season was played in Bradenton, Florida without fans. [22] [23]
20213,187 (2nd)8,3311,004047,8052,636
20227,180 (4th)9,3144,9350129,2415,679

Draft picks

Trades

All-Stars

Olympians

Honors and awards

  • 2006All-Rookie Team: Candice Dupree
  • 2007All-Rookie Team: Armintie Price
  • 2008All-Defensive Second Team: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2008All-Rookie Team: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2010All-WNBA First Team: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2010All-Defensive First Team: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2010All-Rookie Team: Epiphanny Prince
  • 2010Stars at the Sun Game MVP: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2011All-WNBA Second Team: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2011Defensive Player of the Year: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2011All-Defensive First Team: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2011All-Rookie Team: Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2012All-WNBA Second Team: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2012All-Defensive First Team: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2013Rookie of the Year: Elena Delle Donne
  • 2013Defensive Player of the Year: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2013All-Rookie Team: Elena Delle Donne
  • 2013All-Defensive First Team: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2013Peak Performer (Rebounding): Sylvia Fowles
  • 2014WNBA Sixth Woman of the Year: Allie Quigley
  • 2014All-Defensive Second Team: Sylvia Fowles
  • 2015WNBA MVP: Elena Delle Donne
  • 2015WNBA Sixth Woman of the Year: Allie Quigley
  • 2015Peak Performer (Scoring): Elena Delle Donne
  • 2015Peak Performer (Assists): Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2015All-WNBA First Team: Elena Delle Donne
  • 2015All-WNBA Second Team: Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2016All-Rookie Team: Imani Boyette
  • 2017Peak Performer (Assists): Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2018All-WNBA Second Team: Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2018All-Rookie Team: Diamond DeShields
  • 2018Peak Performer (Assists): Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2019Peak Performer (Assists): Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2019Coach of the Year: James Wade
  • 2019All-WNBA First Team: Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2019All-WNBA Second Team: Diamond DeShields
  • 2020Peak Performer (Assists): Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2020All-WNBA First Team: Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2021All-WNBA Second Team: Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2021Finals MVP: Kahleah Copper
  • 2022Basketball Executive of the Year: James Wade
  • 2022All-WNBA First Team: Candace Parker
  • 2022All-Rookie Team: Rebekah Gardner

Arenas

Notes

  1. In the 2016 season, the WNBA changed its playoff format such that teams were seeded for the playoffs regardless of conference.
  2. In the 2016 season, the WNBA changed its playoff format such that teams were seeded for the playoffs regardless of conference.

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The 2017 WNBA season for the Washington Mystics of the Women's National Basketball Association is scheduled to begin May 13, 2017. The Mystics got off to a strong start, posting a 10–5 record in May and June. After a 4–4 July, the Mystics struggled to finish out the season. A 4–6 finish saw them place third in the Eastern Conference, and earn the 6th overall seed in the playoffs. Strong performances from star players allowed the Mystics to win in the First Round over the Dallas Wings and in the Second Round over the New York Liberty. In the Semifinals, the Mystics were swept by the Minnesota Lynx 0–3.

The 2017 Chicago Sky season was the franchise's 12th season in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The Sky started the season slowly, posting a 1–5 record in May. This slow start continued into June where the team only won 2 of 9 games. The team showed improvement in July and August, posting a combined record of 9–8 in those months. An 0–2 September saw the Sky finish with an overall record of 12–22. The Sky finished in 4th place in the Eastern Conference, ahead of the Atlanta Dream via tiebreaker. The team did not qualify for the playoffs.

The 2018 WNBA season of the Minnesota Lynx was their 20th season in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The Lynx finished the 2017 season with a record of 27–7, finishing first in the Western Conference and qualifying for the playoffs, before ultimately beating Los Angeles in the WNBA Finals to win their league-tying best fourth championship.

The 2018 Chicago Sky season is the franchise's 13th season in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The regular season tipped off on May 6, and concludes on August 19.

The 2019 Chicago Sky season was the franchise's 14th season in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The regular season tipped off on May 25 and concluded on September 8. On August 22, the team clinched a playoff berth for the first time in three seasons.

The 2020 Chicago Sky season was the franchise's 15th season in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). This was the second season under head coach James Wade. The Sky did not improve on their previous season's record of 20–14, but entered the playoffs for the second consecutive season.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2021 WNBA Finals</span> Championship series of the 2021 WNBA season

The 2021 WNBA Finals, officially the WNBA Finals 2021 presented by YouTube TV for sponsorship reasons, was the best-of-five championship series for the 2021 season of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The finals featured the fifth-seeded Phoenix Mercury facing off against the sixth-seeded Chicago Sky, a rematch of the 2014 Finals. The Sky defeated the Mercury in 4 games, winning their first WNBA Championship, as well as Chicago's first professional basketball championship since 1998.

The 2022 Chicago Sky season was the franchise's 17th season in the Women's National Basketball Association, and their fourth season under head coach James Wade. They were the defending league champions after defeating the Phoenix Mercury in the 2021 WNBA Finals.

The 2022 Washington Mystics season is the franchise's 25th season in the Women's National Basketball Association. The regular season will tip off versus the Indiana Fever on May 6, 2022.

The 2022 WNBA season was the 26th season of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The Chicago Sky were the defending champions.

The 2022 WNBA All-Star Game was an exhibition basketball game that was played on July 10, 2022 at Wintrust Arena. The Chicago Sky hosted the game and related events for the first time.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2022 WNBA Playoffs</span> Womens basketball league

The 2022 WNBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the WNBA's 2022 season. This postseason ended with the Las Vegas Aces winning their first championship.

References

  1. "Sky Timeline". Sky.WNBA.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. Archived from the original on November 28, 2018. Retrieved November 28, 2018.
  2. 1 2 "Mayor Emanuel Joins Chicago Sky to Announce Team's Move to Wintrust Arena". Sky.WNBA.com (Press release). NBA Media Ventures, LLC. February 2, 2018. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  3. Ecker, Danny (October 22, 2017). "Chicago Sky moving to new McCormick Place arena". Crain's Chicago Business. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  4. "Chicago Sky Unveil New Logo". Sky.WNBA.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. November 7, 2018. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  5. "Sky Logistics" (PDF). 2017 Chicago Sky Media Guide. WNBA Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  6. "Chicago Sky Reproduction Guideline Sheet". WNBA Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  7. "Staff Directory". ChicagoSky.net. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. Retrieved September 5, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. "Chicago Sky announces Michelle Williams as minority owner". OurSports Central. 2006-02-20. Retrieved 2021-10-19.
  9. "Hall of Famer Cowens leaves Sky, joins Pistons staff". ESPN.com. 2006-09-12. Retrieved 2021-10-19.
  10. "Bo Overton moves to Chicago Sky as coach". UPI. 2006-12-12. Archived from the original on 2021-10-29. Retrieved 2021-10-19.
  11. "Sky hire controversial coach". Articles.chicagotribune.com. 2010-10-29. Retrieved 2013-03-22.
  12. "SKY: Sky History - 2011". Wnba.com. Retrieved 2013-03-22.
  13. "SKY: Chicago Sky Waive Shey Peddy and Sydney Carter in 2012". Wnba.com. Retrieved 2013-03-22.
  14. "SKY: Sky Schedule 2013". Wnba.com. Retrieved 2013-03-22.
  15. "Chicago trades Elena Delle Donne for No. 2 overall pick, 2 players". ESPN.com . February 2, 2017. Retrieved February 2, 2017.
  16. "Chicago Sky Announce Change in Coaching Staff". OurSportsCentral.com. August 31, 2018.
  17. Collier, Jamal (February 1, 2021). "Candace Parker officially signs with the Chicago Sky — making them an instant favorite for the WNBA title: 'Nobody has ever signed a free agent like this'". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on 2021-02-01. Retrieved 2021-03-20.
  18. Kenney, Madeline (2021-10-19). "Chicago celebrates Sky's WNBA championship". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved 2021-10-19.
  19. "Chicago Sky Unveil New Nike Uniform for 2018 Season". Sky.WNBA.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. April 26, 2018. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  20. "Chicago Sky Announce TV Schedule for 2021 Season". Chicago Sky. May 10, 2021. Retrieved 2022-03-22.
  21. "WNBA Extends TV Rights Deal with ESPN and ABC". Sports Business. June 18, 2007. Archived from the original on 2009-11-10. Retrieved 2009-08-04.
  22. "WNBA Announces Plan To Tip Off 2020 Season". WNBA. 2020-06-15. Retrieved 2020-06-17.
  23. "WNBA announces plans for 2020 season to start late July in Florida". NBC Sports Washington. 2020-06-15. Retrieved 2020-06-15.

Sources

Sporting positions
Preceded by WNBA Champions
2021 (first title)
Succeeded by
Preceded by WNBA Eastern Conference Champions
2014 (First title)
Succeeded by