Dallas Wings

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Dallas Wings
Basketball current event.svg 2019 Dallas Wings season
Dallas Wings logo.svg
Conference Western
Leagues WNBA
Founded1998;21 years ago (1998)
History Detroit Shock
1998–2009
Tulsa Shock
2010–2015
Dallas Wings
2016–present
Arena College Park Center
Location Arlington, Texas
Team colorsNavy, volt green, cyan [1] [2]
            
Main sponsorAmerican Fidelity
PresidentGreg Bibb
Head coach Brian Agler
Assistant(s) Erin Phillips, Crystal Robinson
OwnershipBill Cameron, Chris Christian, Mark Yancey, Greg Bibb, University of Texas at Arlington
Championships3 (2003, 2006, 2008)
Conference titles4 (2003, 2006, 2007, 2008)
Website wings.wnba.com

The Dallas Wings are a professional basketball team based in Arlington, Texas. The Wings play in the Western Conference in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The team is owned by a group which is led by Chairman Bill Cameron. Greg Bibb is President and CEO. Brad Hilsabeck joined the Dallas Wings ownership group in March 2019 with the acquisition of Mark Yancey’s interest in the Wings.

Arlington, Texas City in Texas, United States

Arlington is a city in the U.S. state of Texas, located in Tarrant County. It is part of the Mid-Cities region of the Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington metropolitan area, approximately 12 miles (19 km) east of downtown Fort Worth and 20 miles (32 km) west of downtown Dallas.

The Western Conference of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) is made up of six teams.

Womens National Basketball Association United Stated top womens professional basketball league

The Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) is a professional basketball league in the United States. It is currently composed of twelve teams. The league was founded on April 24, 1996, as the women's counterpart to the National Basketball Association (NBA), and league play started in 1997. The regular season is played from May to September with the All Star game being played midway through the season in July and the WNBA Finals at the end of September until the beginning of October.

Contents

The team was founded in Auburn Hills, Michigan, before the 1998 WNBA season began and moved to Tulsa, Oklahoma, before the 2010 season; on July 20, 2015, Cameron announced that the franchise would move to Arlington [3] for the 2016 WNBA season.

The 1998 WNBA season was the Women's National Basketball Association's second season. The 1998 season saw two expansion teams join the league, the Detroit Shock and Washington Mystics. The expansion teams allowed the defending champions Houston Comets to move to the Western Conference. The regular season was extended from 28 games to 30 games. The season ended with the Comets winning their second WNBA championship.

Tulsa, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Tulsa is the second-largest city in the state of Oklahoma and 45th-most populous city in the United States. As of July 2016, the population was 413,505, an increase of 12,591 over that reported in the 2010 Census. It is the principal municipality of the Tulsa Metropolitan Area, a region with 991,005 residents in the MSA and 1,251,172 in the CSA. The city serves as the county seat of Tulsa County, the most densely populated county in Oklahoma, with urban development extending into Osage, Rogers, and Wagoner counties.

The 2010 WNBA season was the 14th season of the Women's National Basketball Association. The regular season began with a televised (ESPN2) meeting between the defending champion Phoenix Mercury and the Los Angeles Sparks in Phoenix, Arizona on May 15. The Connecticut Sun hosted the 10th Annual All-Star Game which was broadcast live on ESPN on July 10. This year, it was a contest between Geno Auriemma's USA Basketball team and a single team of WNBA All-Stars. The Finals was a series between the Seattle Storm and the Atlanta Dream which Seattle won 3-0.

The franchise has been home to players such as shooting guard Deanna Nolan, one of women's basketball's all-time leading scorers Katie Smith, Hall of Fame NBA player Karl Malone's daughter Cheryl Ford, Skylar Diggins-Smith, Odyssey Sims, and Australian center Liz Cambage.

Deanna Nolan American basketball player

Deanna Nicole "Tweety" Nolan is an American-Russian professional basketball player for UMMC Ekaterinburg of the Russian Premier League as well as the Russia women's national basketball team. Her primary position is shooting guard, but occasionally plays the point guard position. Her original name was Deana, but was legally changed to Deanna in 2000.

Katie Smith American basketball player and coach

Katie Smith is an American retired professional basketball player, who played most recently in the WNBA. Her primary position was shooting guard, although she sometimes plays small forward or point guard. She is the all-time leading scorer in women's professional basketball, having notched over 7000 points in both her ABL and WNBA career. In 2016, she was voted one of the WNBA's "Top 20 at 20." She was named head coach of the New York Liberty in October 2017. On March 31, 2018, Smith was named to the 2018 class of inductees for the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

Karl Malone American basketball player

Karl Anthony Malone is an American retired professional basketball player. Nicknamed "The Mailman", Malone played the power forward position and spent his first 18 seasons (1985–2003) in the National Basketball Association (NBA) with the Utah Jazz and formed a formidable duo with his teammate John Stockton. Malone also played one season for the Los Angeles Lakers. Malone was a two-time NBA Most Valuable Player, a 14-time NBA All-Star, and an 11-time member of the All-NBA first team. His 36,928 career points scored rank second all-time in NBA history, and he holds the records for most free throws attempted and made, in addition to co-holding the record for the second-most first team All-NBA selections in history. He is considered one of the greatest power forwards in NBA history.

Franchise history

The Detroit Shock (1998–2009)

The Shock were one of the first WNBA expansion teams and began play in 1998. The Shock quickly brought in a blend of rookies and veterans, but only qualified for the postseason once in its first five years of existence. The Shock went through two coaches (hall of famer Nancy Lieberman and Greg Williams) before hiring former Detroit Pistons legend Bill Laimbeer. There were rumors the Shock would fold after the team's awful 2002 season. Laimbeer convinced the owners to keep the team for another year, certain that he could turn things around. The Shock would finish the next season with a 25–9 record and defeated the two-time defending champion Los Angeles Sparks in the 2003 WNBA Finals. Detroit became the first team in league history to go from last place one season to WNBA champions the next season.

Nancy Lieberman basketball player

Nancy Elizabeth Lieberman, nicknamed "Lady Magic", is a former professional basketball player who played and coached in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) and currently works as a broadcaster for the New Orleans Pelicans of the National Basketball Association (NBA), as well as head coach of the Power in the BIG3, where she led them to the 2018 BIG3 Championship. Lieberman is regarded as one of the greatest figures in American women's basketball.

Greg Williams is a retired American basketball coach, most recently head coach of the women's basketball program at Rice University.

Detroit Pistons Professional basketball team in the National Basketball Association

The Detroit Pistons are an American professional basketball team based in Detroit, Michigan. The Pistons compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the league's Eastern Conference Central Division and plays its home games at Little Caesars Arena. The team was founded in Fort Wayne, Indiana as the Fort Wayne (Zollner) Pistons in 1941, a member of the National Basketball League (NBL) where it won two NBL championships: in 1944 and 1945. The Pistons later joined the Basketball Association of America (BAA) in 1948. The NBL and BAA merged to become the NBA in 1949, and the Pistons became part of the merged league. Since moving to Detroit in 1957, the Pistons have won three NBA championships: in 1989, 1990 and 2004.

After a couple seasons of losing in the first round of the playoffs, the Detroit Shock returned to success and would appear in three straight Finals from 2006 to 2008. They won WNBA championship in 2006 over the Sacramento Monarchs and 2008 over the San Antonio Silver Stars, but lost to the Phoenix Mercury in 2007.

2006 WNBA Finals

The 2006 WNBA Finals was the championship series of the 2006 WNBA season, and the conclusion of the season's playoffs. The Detroit Shock, second-seeded champions of the Eastern Conference, defeated the Sacramento Monarchs, second-seeded champions of the Western Conference, three games to two in a best-of-five series. This was Detroit's second title.

Sacramento Monarchs Womens basketball team

The Sacramento Monarchs were a basketball team based in Sacramento, California. They played in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) from 1997 until folding on November 20, 2009. They played their home games at ARCO Arena.

2008 WNBA Finals

The 2008 WNBA Finals was the championship series of the 2008 WNBA season, and the conclusion of the season's playoffs. The Detroit Shock, top-seeded champions of the Eastern Conference, defeated the San Antonio Silver Stars, top-seeded champions of the Western Conference, three games to none in a best-of-five series. This was Detroit's third title in six years.

The Tulsa Shock (2010–2015)

Tulsa had been mentioned as a possible future city for WNBA expansion, but efforts did not come together until the middle of 2009. An organizing committee with Tulsa businesspeople and politicians began the effort to attract an expansion team. The group was originally given a September 1 deadline, however, WNBA President Donna Orender extended that deadline into October. The investment group hired former University of Arkansas head coach Nolan Richardson as the potential franchise general manager and head coach, and on October 15, 2009, the group made its official request to join the league.

A businessperson is a person involved in the business sector – in particular someone undertaking activities for the purpose of generating cash flow, sales, and revenue utilizing a combination of human, financial, intellectual and physical capital with a view to fuelling economic development and growth. An entrepreneur is a person who sets up a business or businesses. He or she is also referred to as a promoter in the entertainment industry.

Donna Orender American basketball player

Donna Geils Orender is a sports executive and a former collegiate and professional All Star basketball player. She was formerly president of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA), and senior vice president of the PGA. Currently, Donna Orender is the Founder and CEO of Orender Unlimited, a Jacksonville, FL based advisory and consultancy firm. She travels the world as a motivation speaker and advocating for the empowerment of women and young girls through her non-profit organization Generation W.

Arkansas Razorbacks mens basketball

The Arkansas Razorbacks basketball team represents the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States in NCAA Division I men's basketball competition. The school's team currently competes in the Southeastern Conference. The team last played in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament in 2018. They lost in the first round to Butler University.

On October 20, 2009, WNBA President Donna Orender, lead investors Bill Cameron and David Box, Tulsa mayor Kathy Taylor, Oklahoma governor Brad Henry, and head coach Nolan Richardson were present for a press conference announcing that the Detroit Shock would relocate to Tulsa. On January 23, 2010, the franchise announced that the team would remain as the Shock but the colors were changed to black, red, and gold. [4]

On July 20, 2015, majority owner Bill Cameron announced he was moving the team to Dallas-Fort Worth.

Dallas Wings (2016–present)

On July 23, 2015, WNBA League owners unanimously approved the Tulsa Shock's relocation to the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex to play out of the College Park Center at the University of Texas at Arlington. [5] College Park Center is also home to the UT Arlington Mavericks basketball and volleyball teams. At a press conference at College Park Center on November 2, 2015, it was announced that the team was renamed the Dallas Wings. [6]

Uniforms

Uniforms were revealed at the First Annual Wings Draft Party April 14, 2016. The light uniforms were primarily lime green while the dark uniforms were predominantly blue. As a result of a league-wide initiative for its 20th season, all games featured all-color uniform matchups, thus no white uniforms were unveiled for this season.

Season-by-season records

Players

Current roster

Dallas Wings roster
PlayersCoaches
Pos.#Nat.NameHeightWeightDOBFromYrs
G 3 Flag of the United States.svg Davis, Kaela 6' 2" (1.88m)170 lb (77kg)03-15-1995 South Carolina 2
G 4 Flag of the United States.svg Diggins-Smith, Skylar 5' 9" (1.75m)145 lb (66kg)08-02-1990 Notre Dame 6
G 14 Flag of the United States.svg Gray, Allisha 6' 0" (1.83m)167 lb (76kg)01-12-1995 South Carolina 2
F 20 Flag of the United States.svg Harrison, Isabelle 6' 3" (1.91m)183 lb (83kg)09-27-1993 Tennessee 3
G 2 Flag of the United States.svg Hill, Tayler 5' 9" (1.75m)145 lb (66kg)10-23-1990 Ohio State 6
F 25 Flag of the United States.svg Johnson, Glory 6' 3" (1.91m)170 lb (77kg)07-27-1990 Tennessee 6
G 1 Flag of the United States.svg McCarty–Williams, Brooke 5' 4" (1.63m)10-02-1995R
C 34 Flag of the United States.svg McGee-Stafford, Imani 6' 7" (2.01m)215 lb (98kg)10-11-1994 Texas 3
G 24 Flag of the United States.svg Ogunbowale, Arike 5' 8" (1.73m)165 lb (75kg)03-02-1997 Notre Dame R
F 55 Flag of the United States.svg Plaisance, Theresa 6' 5" (1.96m)200 lb (91kg)05-18-1992 LSU 5
F/C 30 Flag of the United States.svg Stevens, Azurá 6' 6" (1.98m)180 lb (82kg)02-01-1996 Connecticut 1
F 6 Flag of the United States.svg Thornton, Kayla 6' 1" (1.85m)190 lb (86kg)10-20-1992 UTEP 3



East : ATLCHICONINDNYWAS | West : DALLVLAMINPHOSEA
Head coach
Flag of the United States.svg Brian Agler (St. Edward's)
Assistant coaches
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Erin Phillips (Australia)
Flag of the United States.svg Crystal Robinson (SE Oklahoma State)
Athletic trainer
Flag of the United States.svg Allison Russell (Tulsa)
Strength and conditioning coach
Flag of England.svg Danny Wardell (University of Huddersfield)

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (DP) Unsigned draft pick
  • (FA) Free agent
  • (S) Suspended
  • Cruz Roja.svg Injured

WNBA roster page

NUMPLAYERPOSHEIGHTWEIGHTDOBEXPFROM
3Kaela DavisF-G6-2170MARCH 15, 19952SOUTH CAROLINA
4Skylar Diggins-SmithG5-9145AUGUST 2, 19906NOTRE DAME/USA
15Allisha GrayG6-0167JANUARY 12, 19952SOUTH CAROLINA
3Megan GustafsonF6-3195DECEMBER 13, 1996R
20Isabelle HarrisonF6-3183SEPTEMBER 27, 19932TENNESSEE
2Tayler HillG5-9145OCTOBER 23, 19906OHIO STATE/USA
3Moriah JeffersonG5-6123MARCH 8, 19943CONNECTICUT
25Glory JohnsonF6-3170JULY 27, 19906TENNESSEE/USA
1Brooke McCarty-WilliamsG5-4OCTOBER 2, 1995RTEXAS
34Imani McGee-StaffordC6-7215OCTOBER 11, 19943TEXAS
24Arike OgunbowaleG5-8165MARCH 2, 1997RNOTRE DAME
55Theresa PlaisanceF-C6-5200MAY 18, 19925LOUISIANA STATE
30Azurá StevensF-C6-6180FEBRUARY 1, 19961CONNECTICUT
6Kayla ThorntonF6-1190OCTOBER 20, 19923TEXAS-EL PA

Former players

Coaches and staff

Owners

Head coaches

Interim head coaches
Dallas Wings head coaches

General managers

Assistant coaches

Hall of Famers

Statistics

Dallas Wings statistics

Media coverage

Previously, while in Tulsa, some Shock games were broadcast on The Cox Channel (COX), which is a local television station for certain areas of the state of Oklahoma. More often than not, NBA TV will pick up the feed from the local broadcast, which is shown nationally. The broadcasters for the Shock games were Mike Wolfe and Shanna Crossley. Following the team's move to Dallas, Fox Sports Southwest broadcasts the majority of the games. The 2016 broadcasts featured sportscaster Ron Thulin and Raegan Pebley, the former WNBA player and current head coach of Texas Christian University's women's basketball team, on the call. [7] All games (excluding blackout games, which are available on ESPN3.com) are broadcast to the WNBA LiveAccess game feeds on the league website. Furthermore, some games are broadcast nationally on ESPN, ESPN2 and ABC.

All-time notes

Regular season attendance

Regular season all-time attendance

Draft picks

Trades

All-Stars

  • 1999: Sandy Brondello
  • 2000: Wendy Palmer
  • 2001: None
  • 2002: None
  • 2003: Swin Cash, Cheryl Ford, Deanna Nolan
  • 2004: Cheryl Ford, Deanna Nolan
  • 2005: Swin Cash, Cheryl Ford, Deanna Nolan, Ruth Riley
  • 2006: Cheryl Ford, Deanna Nolan, Katie Smith
  • 2007: Kara Braxton, Cheryl Ford, Deanna Nolan
  • 2008: No All-Star Game
  • 2009: Katie Smith
  • 2010: None
  • 2011: Liz Cambage
  • 2012: No All-Star Game
  • 2013: Glory Johnson
  • 2014: Skylar Diggins, Glory Johnson
  • 2015: Skylar Diggins, Plenette Pierson, Riquna Williams
  • 2016: No All-Star Game
  • 2017: Skylar Diggins-Smith
  • 2018: Liz Cambage, Skylar Diggins-Smith

Olympians

  • 2004: Swin Cash, Ruth Riley
  • 2008: Katie Smith
  • 2012: Liz Cambage (AUS)
  • 2016: Erin Phillips (AUS)

Honors and awards

  • 1998All-WNBA Second Team: Cindy Brown
  • 2003Finals MVP: Ruth Riley
  • 2003Rookie of the Year: Cheryl Ford
  • 2003Coach of the Year: Bill Laimbeer
  • 2003All-WNBA Second Team: Swin Cash
  • 2003All-WNBA Second Team: Cheryl Ford
  • 2003All-WNBA Second Team: Deanna Nolan
  • 2004All-WNBA Second Team: Swin Cash
  • 2005All-Defensive Second Team: Deanna Nolan
  • 2006Finals MVP: Deanna Nolan
  • 2006All-WNBA Second Team: Deanna Nolan
  • 2006All-Defensive Second Team: Cheryl Ford
  • 2006All-Defensive Second Team: Deanna Nolan
  • 2007All-Star Game MVP: Cheryl Ford
  • 2007Sixth Woman of the Year: Plenette Pierson
  • 2007All-Defensive First Team: Deanna Nolan
  • 2008Finals MVP: Katie Smith
  • 2008All-WNBA Second Team: Deanna Nolan
  • 2008All-Defensive Second Team: Deanna Nolan
  • 2008All-Defensive Second Team: Katie Smith
  • 2009All-WNBA Second Team: Deanna Nolan
  • 2009All-Defensive Second Team: Deanna Nolan
  • 2009All-Rookie Team: Shavonte Zellous
  • 2011All-Rookie Team: Liz Cambage
  • 2012All-Rookie Team: Glory Johnson
  • 2012All-Rookie Team: Riquna Williams
  • 2013Sixth Woman of the Year: Riquna Williams
  • 2013All-Defensive Second Team: Glory Johnson
  • 2013All-Rookie Team: Skylar Diggins
  • 2014Most Improved Player: Skylar Diggins
  • 2014Peak Performer (Rebounds): Courtney Paris
  • 2014All-WNBA First Team: Skylar Diggins
  • 2014All-Rookie Team: Odyssey Sims
  • 2015Peak Performer (Rebounds): Courtney Paris
  • 2016All-Rookie Team: Aerial Powers
  • 2017Rookie of the Year: Allisha Gray
  • 2017All-Rookie Team: Kayla Davis
  • 2018All-WNBA First Team: Liz Cambage
  • 2018All-WNBA Second Team: Skylar Diggins-Smith
  • 2018Peak Performer (Points): Liz Cambage

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References

  1. "Dallas Wings Quick Facts" (PDF). 2017 Dallas Wings Media Guide. WNBA Enterprises, LLC. July 8, 2017. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  2. "Dallas Wings Reproduction Guideline Sheet". WNBA Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved August 10, 2016.
  3. "WNBA Approves Relocation of Shock from Tulsa to Dallas-Fort Worth - WNBA.com - Official Site of the WNBA". July 23, 2015
  4. "NBA.com". Wnba.com. Retrieved March 22, 2013.
  5. Evans, Jayda (July 23, 2015). "WNBA owners unanimously approved relocation of Tulsa Shock to Dallas-Fort Worth area". Seattle Times. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  6. WNBA’s Dallas Wings Introduced in DFW Metroplex, WNBA.com, November 2, 2015
  7. "Dallas Wings on Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Los Angeles Sparks
WNBA Champions
2003 (First title)
Succeeded by
Seattle Storm
Preceded by
New York Liberty
WNBA Eastern Conference Champions
2003 (First title)
Succeeded by
Connecticut Sun
Preceded by
Sacramento Monarchs
WNBA Champions
2006 (Second title)
Succeeded by
Phoenix Mercury
Preceded by
Phoenix Mercury
WNBA Champions
2008 (Third title)
Succeeded by
Phoenix Mercury
Preceded by
Connecticut Sun
WNBA Eastern Conference Champions
2006 (Second title)
2007 (Third title)
2008 (Fourth title)
Succeeded by
Indiana Fever