Tom Webster (politician)

Last updated

Tom Webster
Member of the New South Wales Parliament
for Wakehurst
In office
7 October 1978 5 March 1984
Preceded by Allan Viney
Succeeded by John Booth
Deputy Mayor of Warringah
In office
24 September 1996 23 September 1997
MayorSam Danieli
Preceded bySam Danieli
Succeeded byPeter Moxham
Councillor on Warringah Council
In office
14 September 1991 11 September 1999
Preceded byMark Hummerston
Succeeded byRuth Sutton
ConstituencyB Riding/A Ward
Personal details
Political party Labor
Spouse(s)Maja Gubler
(m. 2 February 1980)
Children1 Son
1 Daughter
Alma mater Sydney Technical College
OccupationProperty valuer

Thomas Stephen Webster, (born 5 July 1950) is a property valuer and former Labor Party local councillor and member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, representing the electorate of Wakehurst from 1978 to 1984. [1]

The Australian Labor Party , also known as NSW Labor and Country Labor in regional areas, is the New South Wales branch of the Australian Labor Party. The parliamentary leader is elected from and by the members of the party caucus, comprising all party members in the Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council. The party factions have a strong influence on the election of the leader. The leader's position is dependent on the continuing support of the caucus and the leader may be deposed by failing to win a vote of confidence of parliamentary members. By convention, the premier sits in the Legislative Assembly, and is the leader of the party controlling a majority in that house. The party leader also typically is a member of the Assembly, though this is not a strict party constitutional requirement. Barrie Unsworth, for example, was elected party leader while a member of the Legislative Council. He then transferred to the Assembly by winning a seat at a by-election.

New South Wales Legislative Assembly one of the two chambers of the Parliament of New South Wales

The New South Wales Legislative Assembly is the lower of the two houses of the Parliament of New South Wales, an Australian state. The upper house is the New South Wales Legislative Council. Both the Assembly and Council sit at Parliament House in the state capital, Sydney. The Assembly is presided over by the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly.

Electoral district of Wakehurst state electoral district of New South Wales, Australia

The Electoral district of Wakehurst is an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales. It covers a significant part of Sydney's Northern Beaches as well as parts of the Forest District. Created in 1962, it has been won by the Liberal Party at all but two elections over the last half-century.

Contents

Early years

Born in 1950, Webster was educated at Rozelle Public School and Drummoyne Boys' High School (closed in 1990). [1] After High school he attended Sydney Technical College and became a property valuer from 1970 for the Valuer-General's Department. As a Fellow of the Australian Property Institute (FAPI), Webster served as a divisional councillor from 2004 to 2009 and as president from 2006 to 2007. [2]

Drummoyne Boys High School

Drummoyne Boys' High School (abbreviation:DBHS) is a former high school in the inner western Sydney suburb of Drummoyne, New South Wales, Australia. It was a boys high school operated by the New South Wales Department of Education and Training with students from years 7 to 12. The school was established in 1940. However, due to declining enrolments the school was declared surplus to the needs of the department in 1989 and was officially closed in 1990. The historic original buildings are now the site of the Wesley Institute.

Sydney Technical College college in Australia

The Sydney Technical College, now known as the TAFE New South Wales Sydney Institute, is a technical school established in 1878, that superseded the Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts. The college is one of Australia's oldest technical education institutions.

The Australian Property Institute (API) is a professional industry body representing residential, commercial and plant and machinery valuers, analysts, fund managers and property lawyers.

Political career

Webster joined the Grafton Branch of the Australian Labor Party in 1971 and joined the Dee Why branch in 1976, becoming President from 1977-1978. [1] At age 28, he was pre-selected as Labor Party candidate for the NSW State seat of Wakehurst in 1978. The 1978 election saw a huge swing towards the Labor Party in NSW and was known as the 'Wranslide', in reference to the state leader, Neville Wran, with first-time seat wins in Wakehurst, Manly, Cronulla and Willoughby. Webster was elected on 7 October 1978, becoming the first Labor member of what was a traditionally safe Liberal seat, defeating the sitting Liberal member and Shadow Minister for Services, Allan Viney, [3] [4] on a swing of over 14 percent.

Grafton, New South Wales City in New South Wales, Australia

Grafton is a city in the Northern Rivers region of the Australian state of New South Wales. It is located on the Clarence River, approximately 500 kilometres (310 mi) north-northeast of the state capital Sydney. The closest major cities, Brisbane and the Gold Coast, are located across the border in South-East Queensland. At June 2018 Grafton had a population of 19,078. The city is the largest settlement and administrative centre of the Clarence Valley Council local government area, which has over 50,000 people in all.

1978 New South Wales state election

A general election was held in the state of New South Wales, Australia, on Saturday 7 October 1978. The result was a landslide victory for the Labor Party under Neville Wran, popularly known as the "Wranslide."

Neville Wran Australian politician and Premier of New South Wales

Neville Kenneth Wran, was an Australian politician who was the Premier of New South Wales from 1976 to 1986. He was the national president of the Australian Labor Party (ALP) from 1980 to 1986 and chairman of both the Lionel Murphy Foundation and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) from 1986 to 1991.

During his six years in Parliament, he served on a number of committees including the Public Accounts Committee. He was later appointed as senior policy adviser to the State Premier. He retained his seat at the 1981 election, gaining enough of a swing to technically make Wakehurst a safe Labor seat. However, he lost his seat to Liberal candidate John Booth at the 1984 election. [1] With Booth only winning election on a margin of 1.6%, Wakehurst remained a marginal seat and Webster stood again as the Labor candidate at the 1988 election, but was again unsuccessful on a two-party-preferred result of 57-42% at an election that saw Labor lose power to the Coalition led by Nick Greiner. [5]

1981 New South Wales state election

Elections were held in the state of New South Wales, Australia, on Saturday 19 September 1981. The result was a second "Wranslide": a landslide victory for the Labor Party under Neville Wran. Labor increased its already sizeable majority, winning what is still its biggest-ever share of seats in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly–69 out of 99 seats, 69.7 percent of the chamber.

John David Booth, was a Liberal Party member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, representing the electorate of Wakehurst from 24 March 1984 to 3 May 1991.

1984 New South Wales state election

Elections were held in the state of New South Wales, Australia, on Saturday 24 March 1984. The Labor government led by Neville Wran won a fourth term in office, though with a reduced majority and a 7% swing against it.

Webster was later elected as a Councillor for B Riding (which became A Riding/Ward following the secession of Pittwater Council in 1992) on Warringah Shire Council in September 1991 and later served a single term as Deputy Mayor. He served on the Council until 1999 [6] After leaving he returned to work exclusively for his Valuer Practice, T. S. Webster and Associates, which he had founded in 1988, but remains involved in the Dee Why Branch of the ALP. [2] In the lead-up to the 2011 NSW state election, Webster was made a life member of the ALP and tried to mentor local Labor candidates but lamented to the Manly Daily that: "In my 40-year membership of the party I don’t think we have ever been in such dire straits", a comment that was reflected in the subsequent landslide defeat suffered by the party at that election. [7]

Pittwater Council Local government area in New South Wales, Australia

Pittwater Council was a local government area on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. It covered a region adjacent to the Tasman Sea about 30 kilometres (19 mi) north of the Sydney central business district. The area is named after Pittwater, the body of water adjacent to much of the area governed. On 12 May 2016, the Minister for Local Government announced that Pittwater Council would be subsumed into the newly formed Northern Beaches Council.

Warringah Council Local government area in New South Wales, Australia

Warringah Council was a local government area in the northern beaches region of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. It was proclaimed on 7 March 1906 as the Warringah Shire Council, and became "Warringah Council" in 1993. In 1992, Pittwater Council was formed when the former A Riding of Warringah Shire voted to secede. From this point on until amalgamation, Warringah Council administered 152 square kilometres (59 sq mi) of land, including nine beaches and 14 kilometres (9 mi) of coastline. Prior to its abolition it contained 6,000 hectares of natural bushland and open space, with Narrabeen Lagoon marking Warringah's northern boundary and Manly Lagoon marking the southern boundary.

2011 New South Wales state election

Elections to the 55th Parliament of New South Wales were held on Saturday, 26 March 2011. The 16-year-incumbent Labor Party government led by Premier Kristina Keneally was defeated in a landslide by the Liberal–National Coalition opposition led by Barry O'Farrell. Labor suffered a two-party swing of 16.4 points, the largest against a sitting government at any level in Australia since World War II. From 48 seats at dissolution, Labor was knocked down to 20 seats—the worst defeat of a sitting government in New South Wales history, and one of the worst of a state government in Australia since federation. The Coalition picked up a 34-seat swing to win a strong majority, with 69 seats–the largest majority government, in terms of percentage of seats controlled, in NSW history. It is only the third time since 1941 that a NSW Labor government has been defeated.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Mr Thomas Stephen Webster (1950- )". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  2. 1 2 "Tom Webster, Certified Practicing Valuer". T. S. Webster and Associates. Retrieved 23 September 2012.
  3. Green, Antony. "2007 NSW Election - Wakehurst profile". ABC Elections NSW. ABC. Retrieved 23 May 2009.
  4. "At least 14 new members in the Lower House". The Sydney Morning Herald. 9 October 1978. p. 2.
  5. "Northside election round-up - Wakehurst". The Northern Herald. The Sydney Morning Herald. 10 March 1988. p. 20. Retrieved 2 July 2016.
  6. "Presidents, Mayors, Councillors, Shire Clerks and General Managers of Warringah Council" (PDF). Warringah Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 July 2009. Retrieved 22 May 2009.
  7. Frost, Carleen (25 February 2011). "Ex-peninsula Labor MP laments the state of his 'self-indulgent' party". The Manly Daily. Retrieved 23 September 2012.

 

New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Allan Viney
Member for Wakehurst
1978 1984
Succeeded by
John Booth
Civic offices
Preceded by
Sam Danieli
Deputy Mayor of Warringah
1996 1997
Succeeded by
Peter Moxham