Tooktocaugee, Alabama

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Tooktocaugee, Alabama
Unincorporated community
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Tooktocaugee, Alabama
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Tooktocaugee, Alabama
Coordinates: 33°41′35″N85°41′55″W / 33.69306°N 85.69861°W / 33.69306; -85.69861
Country United States
State Alabama
County Calhoun
Elevation 696 ft (212 m)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
  Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
GNIS feature ID 162881 [1]

Tooktocaugee was an unincorporated community in Calhoun County, Alabama, United States. Tooktocaugee was formerly the site of a Creek Indian village. [2]

Unincorporated area Region of land not governed by own local government

In law, an unincorporated area is a region of land that is not governed by a local municipal corporation; similarly an unincorporated community is a settlement that is not governed by its own local municipal corporation, but rather is administered as part of larger administrative divisions, such as a township, parish, borough, county, city, canton, state, province or country. Occasionally, municipalities dissolve or disincorporate, which may happen if they become fiscally insolvent, and services become the responsibility of a higher administration. Widespread unincorporated communities and areas are a distinguishing feature of the United States and Canada. In most other countries of the world, there are either no unincorporated areas at all, or these are very rare; typically remote, outlying, sparsely populated or uninhabited areas.

Calhoun County, Alabama County in the United States

Calhoun County is a county in the east central part of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 118,572. Its county seat is Anniston. It was named in honor of John C. Calhoun, noted politician and US Senator from South Carolina.

Alabama State of the United States of America

Alabama is a state in the southeastern region of the United States. It is bordered by Tennessee to the north, Georgia to the east, Florida and the Gulf of Mexico to the south, and Mississippi to the west. Alabama is the 30th largest by area and the 24th-most populous of the U.S. states. With a total of 1,500 miles (2,400 km) of inland waterways, Alabama has among the most of any state.

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References

  1. "Tooktocaugee". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey.
  2. "Indian Villages and Forts of the Coosa-Tallapoosa River Region" (PDF). University of Alabama. Retrieved 29 December 2014.